Lockout Training

Lockout Tagout Training Online

Before servicing or maintaining high energy equipment, the machinery must always undergo a lockout procedure and a tagout. This prevents dangerous energy levels from being inadvertently released and resulting in serious injury or even fatalities. Our lockout tagout training online provides all the necessary information for improved safety standards on the job.

  • Pricing

  • 1-10 units: $32.95
  • 11-25 units: $30.95
  • 26-50 units: $27.95
  • 51-100 units: $25.95
  • 101-500 units: $22.95
Buy Lockout Tagout Training

Our online lockout training software provides valuable information regarding hazardous energy, de-energizing procedures, electrical lockout procedures, and tagout labelling for added security and safety. Employees will be guided through a 45 minute learning program that reduces on-site hazards and ensures everyone complies with lockout tagout regulations. The course content includes:

  • Lockout and Definitions
  • Hazardous Energy Control Program
  • Lockout Devices and Steps to Lockout
  • Lockout Processes
  • Alternate Hazardous Energy Control Methods

Who Needs Lockout Tagout Training?

The lockout procedure is very important for employers, managers, supervisors, maintenance professionals, and other workers who work with and around high voltage machinery. Proper lockout procedure, group lockout processes, use of tags, and energy control will help to reduce the likelihood of serious electrical injuries occurring on the job. Individuals who complete this 45 minute course will receive a 2-Year Lockout Certificate that shows they understand the content.

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Lockout and Definitions

  • Control of hazardous energy – electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, thermal, gravitational, radiation, kinetic and potential energy sources
  • Concept of authorized employee, duties and responsibilities

Hazardous Energy Control Program

  • Lockout devices, machine specific procedures, Tagout
  • Construction & installation, cleaning, un-jamming
  • Written procedures, energy isolation

Lockout Devices and Steps to Lockout

  • Employer responsibilities, identification of lockout equipment, plug locks, valve covers, breaker cleats, hasps, tags, keys
  • Lockout procedures, verification of de-energization

Lockout Processes

  • Individual versus group lockout, shift changes, lockbox, lock removal form, lock cutoff

Alternate Hazardous Energy Control Methods

  • Risk and hazard assessment, engineering safeguards, warning and alerting, communication
  • Administrative controls, barriers, attendants, placards, audible, visual signs
  • Communication, training and documentation
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All our online training meets provincial and federal regulations. For specific outlines please select your province below.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following is © 1995 – 2010 Government of Alberta.

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE 2009

Part 15 Managing the Control of Hazardous Energy

Isolation

212(1) If machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment is to be serviced, repaired, tested, adjusted or inspected, an employer must ensure that no worker
performs such work on the machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment until it has come to a complete stop and
(a) all hazardous energy at the location at which the work is to be carried out is isolated by activation of an energy isolating device and the
energy–isolating device is secured in accordance with section 214, 215, or 215.1 as designated by the employer, or
(b) the machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment is otherwise
rendered inoperative in a manner that prevents its accidental activation and provides equal or greater protection than the
protection afforded under (a).

212(2) An employer must develop and implement procedures and controls that ensure the machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment is serviced,
repaired, tested, adjusted or inspected safely if
(a) the manufacturer’s specifications require the machinery, equipment
or powered mobile equipment to remain operative while it is being serviced, repaired, tested, adjusted, or inspected, or
(b) there are no manufacturer’s specifications and it is not reasonably
practicable to stop or render the machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment inoperative.

212(3) If piping, a pipeline or a process system containing a harmful substance
under pressure is to be serviced, repaired, tested, adjusted or inspected, an employer must ensure that no worker performs such work on the piping,
pipeline or process system until flow in the piping, pipeline or process system has been stopped or regulated to a safe level, and the location at which the work
is to be carried out is isolated and secured in accordance with section 215.4.

Verifying isolation

213 A worker must not perform work on machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment to be serviced, repaired, tested, adjusted or inspected until
(a) the actions required by subsection 212(1) are completed,
(b) the machinery, equipment, or powered mobile equipment is tested to verify that it is inoperative, and
(c) the worker is satisfied that it is inoperative.

Securing Isolation

Securing by individual workers

214(1) Once all energy isolating devices have been activated to control hazardous energy in accordance with section 212(1), an employer must ensure
that a worker involved in work at each location requiring control of hazardous energy secures each energy isolating device with a personal lock.

214(2) Once each energy isolating device is secured as required by subsection
(1), the worker must verify that the hazardous energy source has been effectively isolated.

214(3) If more than one worker is working at each location requiring hazardous energy to be controlled,
(a) each worker must attach a personal lock to each energy-isolating device, and
(b) the first worker applying a lock must verify that the hazardous energy source has been effectively isolated.

214(4) If a worker who has placed a personal lock is reassigned before the work is completed, or the work is extended from one shift to another, an employer must ensure that
(a) another worker, authorized by the employer to do so, attaches a personal lock to the energy-isolating device prior to removal of the reassigned or departing worker’s lock, or
(b) there is an effective and orderly transfer of control of the reassigned or departing worker’s lock.

214(5) An employer must ensure that each personal lock used has a unique mark or identification tag on it to identify it as belonging to the worker to whom it is assigned.

214(6) An employer must ensure that the name of the worker to whom a personal lock or identification tag is assigned is readily available during the time a hazardous energy source is isolated.

214(7) Upon completing the work requiring isolation of hazardous energy, an employer must ensure that the machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment is returned to operation in accordance with section 215.3.

Securing by a group

215(1) If a large number of workers is working on machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment, or a number of energy isolating devices must be secured, an employer may use a group procedure in accordance with subsections (2) through (6).

215(2) An employer must ensure that the group procedure referred to in subsection (1) is readily available to workers at the work site where the group procedure is used.

215(3) Once all required energy isolating devices have been activated in accordance with section 212(1) by a worker designated by the employer, an employer must ensure that a designated worker has
(a) secured all energy isolating devices,
(b) secured any keys for the devices used under clause (a) to a key securing system such as a lock box,
(c) completed, signed and posted a checklist that identifies the machinery or equipment covered by the hazardous energy control procedure, and
(d) verified and documented that all sources of hazardous energy are effectively isolated.

215(4) Each worker working at each location requiring control of hazardous energy must apply a personal lock to the key securing system referred to in subsection (3)(b) before working on the machinery, equipment or powered mobile equipment.

215(5) If a worker who has placed a personal lock is reassigned before the work is completed, or the work is extended from one shift to another, an employer must ensure that there is an effective and orderly transfer of control of the reassigned or departing worker’s personal lock.

215(6) Upon completing the work requiring isolation of hazardous energy, a worker referred to in subsection (4) must remove his or her personal lock from the key securing system.

215(7) Upon completing the work requiring isolation of hazardous energy, an employer must ensure that the machinery, equipment, or powered mobile equipment is returned to operation in accordance with section 215.3.

Securing by complex group control

215.1(1) If it is not reasonably practicable to secure energy isolating devices in accordance with sections 214 or 215 because of
(a) the physical size and extent of the machinery, equipment, piping, pipeline, or process system,
(b) the relative inaccessibility of the energy isolating devices,
(c) the number of workers involved in the work requiring hazardous energy control,
(d) the number of energy isolating devices involved,
(e) the extended length of time of the required isolation, or
(f) the interdependence and interrelationship of the components in the system or between different systems, an employer may use a complex group control process approved by a Director of Inspection.

215.1(2) Prior to initiating a complex group control process, an employer must complete a hazard assessment to identify the type and location of hazardous energy sources.

215.1(3) If using a complex group control process, an employer must ensure that
(a) procedures are implemented to ensure continuous safe performance of the work requiring isolation of hazardous energy,
(b) a work permit or master tag procedure is implemented so that
(i) each involved worker personally signs on the job before commencing the work and signs off the job upon completing the work, or
(ii) a crew leader signs on and off the job for a crew or team of workers,
(c) a worker designated by the employer
(i) has activated all required energy-isolating devices to control hazardous energy in accordance with section 212(1), and
(ii) has secured the energy-isolating devices, and
(d) another worker designated by the employer has verified that all sources of hazardous energy are effectively isolated.

215.1(4) If a complex group control process is being used and provided that the isolation point is reasonably accessible and isolation is required for the work being undertaken by the worker, each involved worker may place personal locks on the energy isolating devices and verify effective isolation.

215.1(5) Upon completing the work requiring isolation of hazardous energy, an employer must ensure that the machinery, equipment, piping, pipeline or process system is returned to operation in accordance with section 215.3

Securing remotely controlled systems

215.2(1) If securing an energy isolating device as required by section 212(1) is not reasonably practicable on a system that remotely controls the operation of machinery, equipment, piping, a pipeline or a process system, an employer must ensure that control system isolating devices and the procedures for applying and securing them provide equal or greater protection than the protection afforded under section 212(1)(a).

215.2(2) Upon completing the work requiring isolation of hazardous energy, an employer must ensure that the system is returned to operation in accordance with section 215.3.

Returning to operation

215.3(1) A person must not remove a personal lock or other securing device unless
(a) the person is the worker who installed it,
(b) the person is the designated worker under section 215(3) or section

215.1(3)(c), or (c) the person is acting in accordance with the procedures required under section 215.2

215.3(2) Despite subsection (1), in an emergency or if the worker who installed a lock or other securing device is not available, a worker designated by the employer may remove the lock or other securing device in accordance with a procedure that includes verifying that no worker will be in danger due to the removal.

215.3(3) An employer must ensure that securing devices are not removed until
(a) each involved worker is accounted for,
(b) any personal locks placed by workers under sections 214, 215(4) or
215.1(4) are removed,
(c) procedures are implemented to verify that no worker is in danger
before a worker under section 214(1), designated under section 215(3),
designated under section 215.1(3)(c), or in accordance with
procedures under section 215.2 removes the securing devices and the
machinery, equipment, powered mobile equipment, piping, pipeline
or process system is returned to operation.

215.3(4) An employer must ensure that each involved worker follows the
procedures under subsection (3)(c).

Piping and Pigging

Isolating piping

215.4(1) To isolate piping or a pipeline containing harmful substances under pressure, an employer may use
(a) a system of blanking or blinding, or
(b) a double block and bleed isolation system providing
(i) two blocking seals on either side of the isolation point, and
(ii) an operable bleed off between the two seals.

215.4(2) An employer must ensure that piping that is blanked or blinded is clearly marked to indicate that a blank or blind is installed.

215.4(3) An employer must ensure that, if valves or similar blocking seals with a Bleed off valve between them are used to isolate piping, the bleed off valve is secured in the “OPEN” position and the valves or similar blocking seals in the flow lines are functional and secured in the “CLOSED” position.

215.4(4) An employer must ensure that the device used to secure the valves or seals described in subsection (3) is
(a) a positive mechanical means of keeping the valves or seals in the required position, and
(b) strong enough and designed to withstand inadvertent opening without the use of excessive force, unusual measures or destructive techniques.

215.4(5) If it is not reasonably practicable to provide blanking, blinding or double block and bleed isolation, an employer must ensure that an alternate means of isolation that provides adequate protection to workers, certified as appropriate and safe by a professional engineer, is implemented.

Part 22 Safeguards

Safeguards

310(2) An employer must provide safeguards if a worker may accidentally, or through the work process, come into contact with
(a) moving parts of machinery or equipment,
(b) points of machinery or equipment at which material is cut, shaped or bored,
(c) surfaces with temperatures that may cause skin to freeze, burn or blister,
(d) energized electrical cables,
(e) debris, material or objects thrown from machinery or equipment,
(f) material being fed into or removed from process machinery or equipment,
(g) machinery or equipment that may be hazardous due to its operation, or
(h) any other hazard.

310(2.1) Repealed

310(3) Subsection (2) does not apply to machinery that already has a safeguard that
(a) automatically stops the machinery if a worker comes into contact with a moving part or a point at which material is cut, shaped or bored,
(b) prevents a worker from coming into contact with a hazard referred to in subsection (2), or
(c) eliminates the hazards referred to in subsection (2) before a worker can be injured.

310(4) If an employer determines that an effective safeguard cannot be provided in the circumstances, the employer must ensure that an alternative mechanism or system or a change in work procedure is put into place to protect workers from being exposed to hazards that exist if there is no safeguard.

310(5) An alternative mechanism or system or a change in work procedure put into place under subsection (4) must offer protection to workers that is equal to or greater than the protection from a safeguard referred to in subsection (3). Occupational Health and Safety Code 2009 Part 22 22-2

310(6) An employer must place warning signs on machinery that starts automatically
(a) on a clearly visible location at a point of access to the machinery, and
(b) that give clear instructions to workers on the nature of the hazard.

Tampering with safeguards

311(1) A person must not remove a safeguard from a machine that is operating if the safeguard is not designed to be removed when the machine is operating.
311(2) A person must not remove a safeguard or make it ineffective unless removing it or making it ineffective is necessary to perform maintenance, tests, repairs, adjustments or other tasks on equipment.
311(3) If a worker removes a safeguard or makes it ineffective, the worker must ensure that
(a) alternative protective measures are in place until the safeguard is replaced,
(b) the safeguard is replaced immediately after the task is completed, and
(c) the safeguard functions properly once replaced.

311(4) If a safeguard for machinery is removed or made ineffective and the machinery cannot be directly controlled by a worker, the worker who removes the safeguard or makes it ineffective must lock out or lock out and tag the machinery or render it inoperative.

No safeguards

312(1) Despite other sections in this Part, an employer may allow the machinery to be operated without the safeguards if
(a) safeguards are normally required by this Code for machinery, and
(b) the machinery cannot accommodate or operate with these safeguards.

312(2) If machinery in subsection (1) is operated without safeguards, the employer must ensure workers operating or in the vicinity of the machine wear personal protective equipment that
(a) is appropriate to the hazard, and
(b) offers protection equal to or greater than that offered by the
safeguards.

Part 18 Personal Protective Equipment

Duty to use personal protective equipment

228(1) If the hazard assessment indicates the need for personal protective equipment, an employer must ensure that
(a) workers wear personal protective equipment that is correct for the hazard and protects workers,
(b) workers properly use and wear the personal protective equipment,
(c) the personal protective equipment is in a condition to perform the function for which it was designed, and
(d) workers are trained in the correct use, care, limitations and assigned maintenance of the personal protective equipment.

228(2) A worker must
(a) use and wear properly the appropriate personal protective equipment specified in this Code in accordance with the training and instruction received,
(b) inspect the personal protective equipment before using it, and
(c) not use personal protective equipment that is unable to perform the function for which it is designed.

228(3) An employer must ensure that the use of personal protective equipment does not itself endanger the worker.

Eye Protection

Compliance with standards

229(1) If a worker’s eyes may be injured or irritated at a work site, an employer must ensure that the worker wears properly fitting eye protection equipment that
(a) is approved to
(i) CSA Standard Z94.3 07, Eye and Face Protectors,
(ii) CSA Standard Z94.3 02, Eye and Face Protectors, or
(iii) CSA Standard Z94.3 99, Industrial Eye and Face Protectors, and
(b) is appropriate to the work being done and the hazard involved.

229(2) Prescription eyewear may be worn if it
(a) is safety eyewear,
(b) meets the requirements of
(i) CSA Standard Z94.3 07, Eye and Face Protectors,
(ii) CSA Standard Z94.3 02, Eye and Face Protectors, or Occupational Health and Safety Code 2009 Part 18 18-2
(iii) CSA Standard Z94.3 99, Industrial Eye and Face Protectors, and
(c) is appropriate to the work and the hazard involved.

229(2.1) Prescription safety eyewear having glass lenses must not be used if there is danger of impact unless it is worn behind equipment meeting the requirements of subsection (1).

229(2.2) If the use of plastic prescription lenses is impracticable, and there is no danger of impact, a worker may use lenses made of treated safety glass meeting the requirements of
(a) ANSI Standard Z87.1 2003, Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protection Devices, or
(b) ANSI Standard Z87.1 1989, Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection.

229(2.3) Despite subsection (2), prescription safety eyewear may consist of frames that meet the requirements of ANSI Standard Z87.1 2003, Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protection Devices provided the lenses meet the requirements of CSA Standard Z94.3 07, Eye and Face Protectors.

229(3) If a worker must wear a full face piece respirator and the face piece is intended to prevent materials striking the eyes, an employer must ensure that the face piece
(a) meets the requirements of
(i) CSA Standard Z94.3 07, Eye and Face Protectors, or
(ii) CSA Standard Z94.3 02, Eye and Face Protectors, or
(b) meets the impact and penetration test requirements of section 9 of
(i) ANSI Standard Z87.1 2003, Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protection Devices, or
(ii) ANSI Standard Z87.1 1989, Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection.

Contact lenses

230 An employer must ensure that, if wearing contact lenses poses a hazard to the worker’s eyes during work, the worker is advised of the hazards and the alternatives to wearing contact lenses.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following is © 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 Copyright Workers’ Compensation Board of British Columbia
Richmond, B.C., Canada. All rights reserved.

Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Regulation

De-energization and Lockout

10.1 Definitions
In this Part “control system isolating device” means a device that physically prevents activation of a system used for controlling the operation of machinery or equipment;
“energy isolating device” means a device that physically prevents the transmission or release of an energy source to machinery or equipment;
“energy source” means any electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, thermal, or other source of energy of potential harm to workers;
“key securing system” means a system which physically prevents access to keys when locks or positive sealing devices are applied in a group lockout procedure;
“lockout” means the use of a lock or locks to render machinery or equipment inoperable or to isolate an energy source in accordance with a written procedure;
“maintenance” means work performed to keep machinery or equipment in a safe operating condition, including installing, repairing, cleaning, lubricating and the clearing of obstructions to the normal flow of material;
“normal production” means work that is routine, repetitive, and integral to the normal use of machinery or equipment for production;
“personal lock” means a lock provided by the employer for use by a worker to ensure personal lockout protection such that each lock when applied is operable only by a key in the worker’s possession, and by a key under the control of the supervisor or manager in charge.

10.2 General requirement
If the unexpected energization or startup of machinery or equipment or the unexpected release of an energy source could cause injury, the energy source must be isolated and effectively controlled.

10.3 When lockout required
(1) If machinery or equipment is shut down for maintenance, no work may be done until
(a) all parts and attachments have been secured against inadvertent movement,
(b) where the work will expose workers to energy sources, the hazard has been effectively controlled, and
(c) the energy isolating devices have been locked out as required by this Part.
(2) If machinery or equipment is in use for normal production work, subsection (1) applies if a work activity creates a risk of injury to workers from the movement of the machinery or equipment, or exposure to an energy source, and the machinery or equipment is not effectively safeguarded to protect the workers from the risk.

10.4 Lockout procedures
(1) When lockout of energy isolating devices is required, the devices must be secured in the safe position using locks in accordance with procedures that are made available to all workers who are required to work on the machinery or equipment.
(2) The employer must ensure that each worker required to lock out has ready access to sufficient personal locks to implement the required lockout procedure.
(3) Combination locks must not be used for lockout.
(4) Each personal lock must be marked or tagged to identify the person applying it.
(5) Procedures must be implemented for shift or personnel changes, including the orderly transfer of control of locked out energy isolating devices between outgoing and incoming workers.
(6) If the use of a personal lock is not practicable for lockout, another effective means, if approved by the Board, may be used in place of a personal lock to secure an energy isolating device in the safe position.

10.5 Access to energy isolating devices
When an energy isolating device is locked out, the lock must not prevent access to other energy isolating devices supplying machinery or equipment that could cause injury to workers.

10.6 Checking locked out equipment
(1) Effective means of verifying lockout must be provided and used.
(2) Before commencing work, a worker must verify that all energy sources have been effectively locked out.

10.7 Worker responsibilities
Each worker who works on machinery or equipment requiring lockout is responsible for
(a) locking out the energy isolating devices before starting work, except as provided by section 10.9,
(b) removing personal locks on the completion of his or her work, and
(c) maintaining immediate control of the key(s) to personal locks throughout the duration of the work.

10.8 Removal of locks
(1) A personal lock must only be removed by the worker who installed it, or if this is not possible, the matter must be referred to the supervisor or manager in charge, who will be responsible for its removal.
(2) The supervisor or manager in charge must
(a) make every reasonable effort to contact the worker who installed the lock, and
(b) ensure that the machinery or equipment can be operated safely before removing the lock.
(3) A worker must be notified at the start of his or her next shift if the worker’s personal lock(s) have been removed since the worker’s previous shift.

10.9 Group lockout procedure
(1) If a large number of workers are working on machinery or equipment or a large number of energy isolating devices must be locked out, a group lockout procedure that meets the requirements of subsections (2) to (7) may be used.
(2) In a group lockout procedure 2 qualified workers must be responsible for
(a) independently locking out the energy isolating devices,
(b) securing the keys for the locks used under paragraph (a) with personal locks or other positive sealing devices acceptable to the Board, and
(c) completing, signing and posting a checklist that identifies the machinery or equipment components covered by the lockout.
(3) Before commencing work each worker working on the locked out components must apply a personal lock to the key securing system used in subsection
(2)(b).
(4) Workers may lock out a secondary key securing system if 2 qualified workers lock out the primary key securing system and place their keys in the secondary system.
(5) On completion of his or her work, each worker referred to in subsections (3) and (4) must remove his or her personal lock from the key securing system.
(6) When the requirements of subsection (5) have been met and it has been determined that it is safe to end the group lockout, 2 qualified workers must be responsible for removing their personal locks or the positive sealing device(s) from the key securing system or systems containing the keys for the locks used under subsection (2)(a), and once those keys are released, the system is no longer considered to be locked out.
(7) The written group lockout procedure must be conspicuously posted at the place where the system is in use.

10.10 Alternative procedures
(1) If lockout of energy isolating devices as required by section 10.3 is not practicable,
(a) in the case of a power system as defined in Part 19 (Electrical Safety), the requirements of that Part must be followed,
(b) in the case of mobile equipment as defined in Part 16 (Mobile Equipment), the requirements of that Part must be followed,
(c) in the case of machinery or equipment designed and equipped with effective control system isolating devices, the devices must be locked out as required by sections 10.4 to 10.9, and 10.10(2), and
(d) in an emergency, the energy isolating devices or control system devices must be effectively controlled to prevent inadvertent start up or hazardous energy release.
(2) Control system isolating devices and the procedures for using them must be approved in writing by the Board, and must be used by workers qualified and authorized to carry out the work.

10.11 Locks not required
The application of a lock is not required under section 10.3 or 10.10 if
(a) the energy isolating device is under the exclusive and immediate control of the worker at all times while working on the machinery or equipment, or
(b) a tool, machine or piece of equipment which receives power through a readily disconnected supply, such as an electrical cord or quick release air or hydraulic line, is disconnected from its power supply and its connection point is kept under the immediate control of the worker at all times while work is being done.

10.12 Work on energized equipment
If it is not practicable to shut down machinery or equipment for maintenance, only the parts which are vital to the process may remain energized and the work must be performed by workers who
(a) are qualified to do the work,
(b) have been authorized by the employer to do the work, and
(c) have been provided with and follow written safe work procedures.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The permission to reproduce this material is provided by the Queens Printer for Manitoba. The Queens Printer does not warrant the accuracy or currency of the reproduction of this information.

“lockout” means the disconnection, blocking or bleeding of all sources of energy that may create a motion or action by any part of a machine and its auxiliary equipment.

“tag-out” means the placement of a tag on a machine, tool or piece of equipment that states that workers are not to start or operate the machine, tool or piece of equipment.

PART 16 MACHINES, TOOLS AND ROBOTS DIVISION 1

Application

16.1 This Division applies to every workplace where a machine or tool is used.

Safe work procedures

16.2(1) An employer must (a) develop and implement safe work procedures respecting all machines and tools used in the workplace; (b) train workers in the safe work procedures; and (c) ensure that workers comply with the safe work procedures.

16.2(2) The safe work procedures must include practices and procedures dealing with the lockout of machines used in the workplace.

Duty to inform workers 16.3 An employer must ensure that a worker is (a) informed of any risks associated with a machine or tool used in the workplace; and (b) provided with information, instruction and training in the safe use and operation of the machine or tool.

LOCKOUT

Locking out – safety precautions 16.14(1) Subject to subsections (3) and (4), when a machine is serviced, repaired,
tested, cleaned, maintained or adjusted, an employer must ensure that no worker performs work on the machine until it has come to a complete stop and the worker performing work on the machine has (a) locked out the machine and removed and rendered safe any hazardous condition; or (b) otherwise rendered the machine inoperative in a manner that prevents reactivation and provides protection that is equal to, or greater than, the protection provided by clause (a).

16.14(2) An employer must ensure that a worker does not perform work on a machine that is to be serviced, repaired, tested, cleaned, maintained or adjusted until (a) the machine is tested to ensure that it is inoperative; and (b) the worker is assured that it is inoperative.

16.14(3) An employer must develop and implement safe work procedures for the service, repair, testing, cleaning, maintenance or adjustment of a machine when (a) the manufacturer’s specifications require the machine to remain operative when it is serviced, repaired, tested, cleaned, maintained or adjusted; or (b) there are no manufacturer’s specifications and it is not reasonably practicable to lockout the machinery when it is serviced, repaired, tested, cleaned, maintained or adjusted.

16.14(4) When it is not reasonably practicable to lockout the machinery when it is serviced, repaired, tested, cleaned, maintained or adjusted, an employer must ensure that the safe work procedures developed in subsection (3) offer protection to a worker that is equal to or greater than the protection provided by a lockout procedure.

Removing a lock 16.15(1) No person may remove a lock from locked out machinery unless the person is the worker who
installed the lock.

16.15(2) Despite subsection (1), a competent person designated by the employer may remove the lock in an emergency or when the worker who installed the lock is not available.

16.15(3) An employer must ensure that no worker returns a machine to operation after it has been locked out or rendered inoperable until the worker determines that no other person may be endangered by the operation of the machine.

Lock and key process 16.16(1) When the lockout procedure uses a lock and key, an employer must (a) issue to each
worker who is required or permitted to work on a machine a lock that is operable only by that worker’s key or a duplicate key; (b) designate a worker to keep the duplicate key; (c) ensure that the duplicate key is accessible only to the designated worker; (d) ensure that the lock used has a unique mark or identification tag on it that identifies the worker to whom the lock is assigned; and (e) ensure that a logbook is kept to record the use of the duplicate key.

16.16(2) Where it is not reasonably practicable to use a worker’s key to remove a lock, the employer may permit the designated worker to remove the lock if the designated worker has determined that (a) the key used to lock the lock is not available; and (b) it is safe to remove the lock and activate the machine.

16.16(3) When the lock has been removed, an employer must ensure that the worker who locked out the machine is informed of the removal of the lock.

Control of more than one machine 16.17 When a central automated system controls more than one machine, an employer
must ensure that any machine to be serviced, repaired, tested, cleaned, maintained or adjusted is isolated from the central system before the lockout procedures are implemented.

Transitional: continued use of tag-out system 16.18 Despite the requirements of this Part, an employer may continue to
use a tag-out system at a workplace for no more than one year after this regulation comes into force if a tag-out system was in use at the workplace when this regulation comes into force.

ADDITIONAL SAFEGUARDS FOR CONVEYORS

Emergency stopping system for conveyor 16.19(1) An employer must ensure that a conveyor has an emergency stopping
system that is readily accessible to workers working at the conveyor unless worker access to the conveyor is prevented by guarding or other means.

16.19(2) An employer must ensure that a conveyor emergency stopping system is designed and installed so that manual resetting is
required before the conveyor can be restarted after an emergency stop.

16.19(3) An employer must ensure that a conveyor cannot be restarted after an emergency stop until an inspection has determined that
the conveyor can be operated safely.

Emergency pull-cords 16.20 When the emergency stopping system uses emergency stop pull-cords, an employer must ensure that (a) the pull-cords are clearly visible and readily accessible at the operator’s normal control station and at other appropriate points; and (b) the system is activated when (i) the pull-cord is pulled in any direction, (ii) the pull-cord breaks, or (iii) the failure of a single spring in the pull-cord assembly occurs.

Elevated conveyors 16.21 If an elevated conveyor crosses over a place where a worker may pass or work, an employer
must ensure that a suitable guarding system is provided to prevent materials on the conveyor from falling on the worker.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following is © QUEEN’S PRINTER FOR NEW BRUNSWICK. All rights reserved.

NEW BRUNSWICK REGULATION 91-191

under the OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT (O.C. 91-1035)

Lockout

239(1) An employer shall ensure that in addition to the normal control start and stop mechanism, a machine has a means of isolating the energy source to the machine that is
(a) lockable,
(b) in a location familiar to all employees, and
(c) properly identified.

239(2) An employer shall provide a safety lock and key to an employee who may have to lock out a machine.

239(3) An employer shall establish a written lock out procedure for a machine and ensure that an employee who may have to lock out a machine has been adequately trained to lock out the machine.

239(4) Subject to section 240, where a machine is to be cleaned, maintained, adjusted or repaired, an employer shall ensure that no employee works on the machine until (a) a competent person puts the machine in a zero energy state,
(b) each employee who will be working on the machine
(i) verifies that all potential energy sources have been made inoperative,
(ii) locks out the machine using the safety lock and key provided by the employer, and
(iii) puts on the safety lock a tag that does not conduct electricity and that contains
(A) words directing persons not to start or operate the machine,
(B) the employee’s printed name and signature, and
(C) the date and time when the tag was put on the machine.

239(5) No employee shall clean, maintain, adjust or repair a machine until the employee verifies that paragraphs 4(a) and (b) have been complied with and verifies by testing that the machine is inoperative. 2001-33 239(6) No person shall remove a lock out device or tag on a machine except
(a) the person who installed it, or
(b) in an emergency or where attempts made to contact the person referred to in paragraph (a) indicate the person is not available, a competent employee designated by the employer.

240 Where the lock out procedure referred to in section 239 is inappropriate for the cleaning, maintenance, adjustments or repairs to be performed or is inadequate for the protection of an employee, an employer shall
(a) establish a code of practice in consultation with the joint health and safety committee or health and safety representative, if any, specifying personnel responsibilities, personnel training and details of procedure for the neutralization, clearance, release and start up of the machine, and
(b) comply with and enforce the code of practice. 2001-33

Contact with Machines

241(1) An employer shall ensure that sufficient space is provided around a machine in order to ensure the safety of employees while the machine is being operated or while cleaning, maintenance, adjustments or repairs to the machine are being carried out.

241(2) Where an employee or the employee’s clothing may come into contact with moving parts of a machine or a moving machine, the employee shall
(a) wear close fitting clothing,
(b) confine or cut head and facial hair, and
(c) not wear jewellery, rings, dangling neckwear or similar items.

Safeguards

242(1) Where an employee may come into contact with moving drive or idler belts, rollers, gears, driveshafts, keyways, pulleys, sprockets, chains, ropes, spindles, drums, counterweights, flywheels, couplings, pinchpoints, cutting edges or other moving parts on a machine that may be hazardous to the employee, an employer shall provide adequate safeguards to prevent such contact.

242(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to a machine that is equipped with a device that stops the machine automatically before an employee comes into contact with the parts mentioned in subsection (1).

242(3) Where there is a possibility of a failure of a machine that may result in an injury to an employee from a flying object, an employer shall install a safeguard strong enough to contain or deflect any flying object.

242(4) No employer or employee shall alter the design of a machine where it has been designed with a safeguard that interlocks with the machinery control so as to prevent the operation of the machine unless the safeguard is in its proper place.

242(5) Where an employer has determined that an adequate safeguard for a machine cannot be provided, the employer shall ensure that a physical modification of the machine is carried out or a change in work procedure is put into place to protect employees from being exposed to the hazards associated with the lack of an adequate safeguard.

243(1) No person shall remove or render ineffective a safeguard for a machine unless the removal or rendering ineffective is necessary to enable the cleaning, maintenance, adjustment or repair of the machine.

243(2) Where a person removes or renders ineffective a safeguard for a machine, the person shall ensure that the safeguard is replaced and is functioning properly before leaving the machine or that the machine is in a zero energy state.

243(3) Where a safeguard for a machine is to be removed or rendered ineffective and the machine cannot be directly controlled by the person who removes or renders ineffective the safeguard, the person shall put the machine in a zero energy state and lock out the machine in accordance with section 239 or follow the code of practice in section 240 before removing or rendering ineffective the safeguard.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

Copyright © 2009: Queen’s Printer, St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, 2009

under the Occupational Health and Safety Act (O.C. 2009-233)

PART IX
DE-ENERGIZATION AND LOCKOUT

Definitions

127. In this Part
(a) “control system isolating device” means a device that physically
prevents activation of a system used for controlling the operation of machinery or equipment;
(b) “energy isolating device” means a device that physically prevents the transmission or release of an energy source to machinery or equipment;
(c) “energy source” means an electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, thermal or other source of energy of potential harm to workers;
(d) “key securing system” means a system which physically prevents access to keys when locks or positive sealing devices are applied in a group lockout procedure;
(e) “lockout” means the use of a lock to render machinery or equipment inoperable or to isolate an energy source in accordance with written procedure;
(f) “maintenance” means work performed to keep machinery or equipment in a safe operating condition, including installation, repair, cleaning, lubrication and the clearing of obstructions; (g) “normal production” means work that is routine, repetitive, and integral to the normal use of machinery or equipment for production; and
(h) “personal lock” means a lock provided by the employer for use by a worker to ensure personal lockout protection such that each lock, when applied, is operable only by a key in the worker’s possession, and by a key under the control of the supervisor or manager in charge.

General requirement

128. Where the unexpected energization or startup of machinery or equipment or the unexpected release of an energy source could cause injury, the energy source shall be isolated and effectively controlled.

When lockout required

129. (1) Where machinery or equipment is shut down for maintenance, no work may be done until
(a) all parts and attachments have been secured against inadvertent movement;
(b) where the work would expose workers to energy sources, the hazard has been effectively controlled; and
(c) the energy isolating devices have been locked out as required by this Part.

(2) Where machinery or equipment is in use for normal production work, subsection (1) applies where a work activity creates a risk of injury to workers from the movement of the machinery or equipment, or exposure to an energy source, and the machinery or equipment is not effectively safeguarded to protect the workers from the risk.

Lockout procedures

130. (1) Where lockout of energy isolating devices is required, the devices shall be secured in the safe position using locks in accordance with procedures that are made available to all workers who are required to work on the machinery or equipment.

(2) An employer shall ensure that each worker required to lock out has ready access to sufficient personal locks to implement the required lockout procedure.

(3) Combination locks shall not be used for lockout.

(4) A personal lock shall be marked or tagged to identify the person applying it, the equipment being locked out and the date the lock was applied.

(5) Procedures shall be implemented for shift or personnel changes, including the orderly transfer of control of locked-out energy isolating devices between outgoing and incoming workers.

(6) Where the use of a personal lock is not practicable for lockout, other effective means approved by the minister may be used in place of a personal lock to secure an energy isolating device in the safe position.

(7) Where an energy isolating device is locked out, the lock shall not prevent access to other energy isolating devices supplying machinery or equipment that could cause injury to workers.

Checking locked out equipment

131. (1) Effective means of verifying lockout shall be provided and used.

(2) Before commencing work, a worker shall verify that all energy sources have been effectively locked out.

Worker responsibilities

132. A worker who works on machinery or equipment requiring lockout is responsible for
(a) locking out the energy isolating devices before starting work except as provided by section 134;
(b) removing personal locks on the completion of his or her work; and
(c) maintaining immediate control of the key to personal locks throughout the duration of the work.

Removal of locks

133. (1) A personal lock shall only be removed by the worker who installed it, or where
this is not possible, the matter shall be referred to the supervisor who shall be responsible for its removal.

(2) A supervisor shall
(a) make every reasonable effort to contact the worker who installed the lock;
(b) ensure that the machinery or equipment can be operated safely before removing the lock; and
(c) ensure that locks that are not in active use are removed from machinery or equipment.

(3) A worker shall be notified at the start of his or her next shift where the worker’s personal lock has been removed since the worker’s previous shift.

Group lockout procedure

134. (1) Where a large number of workers are working on machinery or equipment or a large number of energy isolating devices are to be locked out, a group lockout procedure that meets the requirements of this section may be used.

(2) In a group lockout procedure, 2 qualified workers shall be responsible for
(a) independently locking out the energy isolating devices;
(b) securing the keys for the locks used under paragraph (a) with personal locks or other positive sealing devices acceptable to the minister; and
(c) completing, signing and posting a checklist that identifies the machinery or equipment components covered by the lockout.

(3) Before commencing work, a worker working on the locked out components shall apply a personal lock to the key securing system referred to in paragraph (2)(b).

(4) Workers may lock out a secondary key securing system where 2 qualified workers lock out the primary key securing system and place their keys in the secondary system.

(5) On completion of his or her work, a worker referred to in subsections (3) and (4) shall remove his or her personal lock from the key securing system.

(6) Where the requirements of subsection (5) have been met and it has been determined that it is safe to end the group lockout, 2 qualified workers shall be responsible for removing their personal locks or the positive sealing device from the key securing system containing the locks referred to in paragraph (2)(a), and when those keys are released, the system is no longer considered to be locked out.

(7) The written group lockout procedure shall be conspicuously posted at the place where the system is in use.

Alternative procedures

135. (1) Where lockout of energy isolating devices as required by section 129 is not practicable,
(a) in the case of a power system as defined in Part XXVI, the requirements of that Part shall be followed;
(b) in the case of mobile equipment as defined in Part XII, the requirements of that Part shall be followed;
(c) in the case of machinery equipment designed and equipped with effective control system isolating devices, the devices shall be locked out as required by sections 130 to 134 and subsection (2); and
(d) in an emergency, the energy isolating devices or control system devices shall be effectively controlled to prevent inadvertent start-up or hazardous energy release.

(2) Control system isolating devices and the procedures for their use shall be approved in writing by the minister and shall be used by a qualified worker authorized to carry out the work.

Where locks not required

136. The application of a lock is not required under section 129 or 135 where
(a) the energy isolating device is under the exclusive and immediate control of the worker at all times while working on the machinery or equipment; or
(b) a tool, machine or piece of equipment that receives power through a readily disconnected supply, including an electrical cord or quick release air or hydraulic line, is disconnected from its power supply and its connection point is kept under the immediate control of the worker at all times while the work is being done.

Work on energized equipment

137. Where it is not practicable to shut down machinery or equipment for maintenance, only the parts which are vital to the process may remain energized and the work shall be performed by a qualified worker who has been authorized by the employer to do the work and provided with and follows written safe work procedures.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following is copyright © 2009, Province of Nova Scotia

Occupational Health and Safety Act S.N.S. 1996, c. 7

Part 6 – Lock-out

Interpretation, application, control and energizing

51 (1) In this Part,
(a) “equipment” includes
(i) pipes for transporting a material, and
(ii) hydraulic or pneumatic lines;
(b) “lock-out device” means the device that secures the isolation of the energy source of a locked out machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation;
(c) “lock-out location” means the location of a lock-out device;
(d) “lock-out tag” means a tag that
(i) is installed at a lock-out location,
(ii) has words directing a person not to start or operate the machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation,
(iii) identifies the person who has performed a lock-out, and
(iv) does not readily conduct electricity; and
(e) “zero energy state” means a condition in which a machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation is rendered incapable of spontaneous or unexpected action or otherwise releasing kinetic or potential energy.

(2) This Part applies to a machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation that is erected, installed, assembled, started, operated, handled, stored, stopped, inspected, serviced, tested, cleaned, adjusted, maintained, repaired or dismantled .

(3) An employer shall ensure that, in addition to any normal start and stop control mechanism, a machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation has a means of isolating all sources of energy to the machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation that is
(a) accessible when needed by an employee; and
(b) readily identifiable.

(4) An employer shall ensure that where a person may be exposed to a hazard by the energizing of a machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation, or any part of it, a de- energized machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation, or any part of it, is energized
(a) only in accordance with an applicable written procedure established by the employer; and
(b) only after all persons are clear of the hazardous area and have been instructed to remain clear.
[Note: Section 51 effective November 1, 2000.]

Lock-out procedure

52 (1) Where work is performed on a machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation, and the work is hazardous to a person in the workplace if the machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation is or becomes energized, an employer shall ensure that

(a) the work is done in accordance with a written lock-out procedure established by the employer;
(b) no person works on the machine,
equipment, tool or electrical installation until the machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation (i) is put in and maintained at a zero
energy state,

Subclause 52(1)(b)
(i) amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(ii) is locked out, and
(iii) has a lock-out tag at each lock-out location; and
(c) a competent person verifies that the requirements of clauses (a) and (b) have been complied with and tests to determine that the machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation is in a zero energy state.

(1A) No employee shall perform work on a machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation in the circumstances described in subsection (1) unless the requirements of clause 52(1)(b) are met.
Subsection 52(1A) added: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.

(2) The written lock-out procedure referred to in subsection (1) shall include
(a) provision for complying with the requirements of subsection (1);
(b) the method of notifying a person in the work area of safe conditions for work after a lock- out has been completed;
(c) the method of determining that all persons near the locked out machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation are clear of the hazardous area and have been instructed to remain clear before the machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation, or any part of it, is energized; and
(d) the method of energizing the machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation.
[Note: Section 52 and amendments to it made by O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000 effective November 1, 2000.]

53 (1) No person other than the person who installed it shall remove a lock-out device or a lock-out tag on a machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation.

(2) Despite subsection (1), where
reasonable attempts have been made to contact the person who locked out the machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation and that person is not
available,
(a) in a serious emergency, a person who has determined that it is safe to energize the equipment may remove a lock-out device or a
lock-out tag; or
(b) a competent person who
(i) is designated in the written lock-out procedure, and
(ii) has determined that it is
safe to energize the equipment, may remove a lock-out device or a lock-out tag.
[Note: Section 53 effective November 1, 2000.]

54 Despite subsection 51(4) or Section 52, where work is performed on a machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation, and the work is hazardous to a
person in the workplace if the machine, equipment, tool or electrical installation is or becomes energized, and the requirements of subsection 51(4) or
Section 52 are
(a) inappropriate for the work to be performed or inadequate for the protection of persons at the workplace; or
(b) not reasonably practicable where the electrical installation is used for the generation or transmission of electricity, an employer may substitute for
the requirements of those provisions an alternative adequate written procedure that specifies personnel responsibilities, training and equipment
requirements and the details for carrying out the work in a manner that will ensure the safety of all person who

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following is © Queen’s Printer for Ontario, 2009 – 2009

Occupational Health and Safety Act – R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 851

42. (1) The power supply to electrical installations, equipment or conductors shall be disconnected, locked out of service and tagged before any work is done, and while it is being done, on or near live exposed parts of the installations, equipment or conductors.

(2) Before beginning the work, each worker shall determine if the requirements of subsection (1) have been complied with.

(3) Locking out is not required,
(a) if the conductors are adequately grounded with a visible grounding mechanism; or
(b) if the voltage is less than 300 volts and there is no locking device for the circuit breakers or fuses and procedures are in place adequate to ensure that the circuit is not inadvertently energized.

(4) If locking out is not required for the reason set out in clause (3)(b), the employer shall ensure that the procedures required by that clause are carried out.

(5) If more than one worker is involved in the work referred to in subsection (1), the worker who disconnected and locked out the power supply shall communicate the purpose and status of the disconnecting and locking out.

(6) If a tag is used as a means of communication, the tag,
(a) shall be made of non-conducting material;
(b) shall be secured to prevent its inadvertent removal;
(c) shall be placed in a conspicuous location;
(d) shall state the reason the switch is disconnected and locked out;
(e) shall show the name of the worker who disconnected and locked out the switch; and
(f) shall show the date on which the switch was disconnected and locked out.

(7) The employer shall establish and implement written procedures for compliance with this section. O. Reg. 630/94, s. 1.

42.1 (1) This section applies and section 42 does not apply if it is not practical to disconnect electrical installations, equipment or conductors from the power supply before working on, or near, live exposed parts of the installations, equipment or conductors.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following material is © Government of Prince Edward Island

Cap. O-1.01 Occupational Health and Safety Act

MECHANICAL SAFETY

30.1 In this regulation
(a) “safeguard” means a guard shield, guardrail, fence, gate, barrier, wire mesh or other protective enclosure, safety net, handrail or other similar equipment designed to protect the safety of employees, but does not include personal protective equipment;
(b) “push block” means a block of wood long enough to protect employees from the danger area and provided with a handle similar to that of a hand plane and having a shoulder at the rear;
(c) “push stick” means a narrow strip of wood or other soft material with a notch cut into one end. (EC180/87)

30.2 The employer shall ensure that all moving parts of machinery, equipment and tools shall be effectively safeguarded unless
(a) they are so constructed or located as to prevent a person or object from coming in contact with them; or
(b) the guarding would unreasonably interfere with the operation of the machinery, equipment or tool. (EC180/87)

30.3 (1) The employer shall ensure that machinery is erected, installed, assembled, started, operated, used, handled, stored, stopped, serviced, tested, adjusted, maintained, repaired and dismantled in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications.

(2) The employer shall ensure that the manufacturer’s rated capacity or other limitations on the operation of the machinery or any part of it, as set out in the manufacturer’s specifications or in any relevant specifications certified by an engineer are not exceeded and are clearly marked on the machinery in a location clearly visible to the operator.

(3) An operator of machinery shall not exceed the limitations described in subsection (2).

(4) The employer shall ensure that machinery is regularly inspected for defects and machinery which could cause injury to employees is removed from service until repaired. (EC180/87)

30.4 (1) The employer shall ensure that operational controls on machinery are
(a) located and protected in such a manner as to prevent unintentional activation;
(b) suitably identified so as to indicate the nature of each control mechanism.

(2) Where a pedal is used to operate a clutch or belt shifter, the employer shall ensure that it is so guarded that it cannot be struck accidentally so as to activate the machine.

(3) The employer shall ensure that each pair of active and idler pulleys is equipped with a permanent belt shifter provided with a mechanical means of preventing the belt from creeping from the idler to the active pulley.

(4) The employer shall ensure that (a) where moving machine parts may endanger employees when the machine is started and there is not a clear view of the machine or
push stick
Guarding moving parts
General provisions respecting machinery
Specifications
Idem
Inspection
Starting machinery
Pedals
Pulleys
Alarm system

parts from the control panel or operator’s station, an alarm system is installed; and
(b) the alarm system gives an effective warning before start up of the machine so that employees are made aware of the imminent start-up.

(5) Before starting machinery, an employee shall ensure that neither he nor any other employee is endangered by its starting.

(6) While operating machinery, an employee shall ensure that neither he nor any other employee is endangered by its operation. (EC180/87)

30.5 (1) The employer shall ensure that the operator of any machine has unimpeded access in the immediate area of the employees work area to the means of stopping that machine.

(2) The employer shall ensure that every power driven machine not driven by an individual motor or prime mover is equipped with a clutch, idler pulley or other means of quickly disengaging the power sources. (EC180/87)

30.6 (1) The employer shall ensure that in addition to the normal control start and stop switch, all electrically driven machinery and equipment has installed in the power supply circuit a disconnecting means which is (a) of a lockable type; (b) in a location familiar to all; and (c) properly identified.

(2) The employer shall provide a safety lock and key for use on disconnecting means described in subsection (1) to all machinery and equipment operators and all maintenance personnel.

(3) The employer shall ensure that an employee has been adequately trained in lockout procedures for the particular situation.

(4) The employer shall ensure that machinery is not lubricated, cleaned, serviced or repaired while in motion unless a means is available which does not expose the employee to risk of injury. (EC180/87)

30.7 (1) Where machinery or equipment is shut down for cleaning, maintenance or repairs, the employer shall ensure that no employee carries out work on the machinery or equipment until that employee has
(a) locked out the source of energy using the safety lock and key that the employer must provide under section 30.6; and
(b) put the machine in a zero energy state by ensuring that all
(i) power sources,
(ii) pressurized fluids and air,
(iii) potential mechanical energy,
Starting
Operation
Stopping machinery
Idem
Lock-out
Idem
Training
Shut-down
Servicing

(iv) accumulators and air surge tanks,
(v) kinetic energy of machine members,
(vi) loose or freely movable machine members, and
(vii) material or workpieces supported, retained or controlled by the machine which can move or cause movement, are
(A) locked out,
(B) vented to the atmosphere,
(C) reduced to atmospheric pressure, or
(D) otherwise acted upon to render the machinery incapable of spontaneous or unexpected action;
(c) put on the control device of the machinery a tag which does not conduct electricity and which contains
(i) words directing persons not to start or operate the machinery,
(ii) the employee’s printed name and signature, and
(iii) the date when the tag was put on the machinery.

(2) No employee shall carry out work on machinery or equipment shut down for cleaning, maintenance or repairs until he has complied with subsection (1) and has double checked to ensure that the machinery is inoperative.

(3) No person shall remove a lock-out device or tag except
(a) the employee who installed it; or
(b) in an emergency or where attempts made to contact the employee indicate he is not available, a competent employee designated by the employer, who has first ensured that no person will be endangered by the removal.

(4) On completion of servicing or repairs, the employee shall, before the operation of the machine is resumed, ensure that putting the machinery in motion will not endanger any person. (EC180/87)

30.8 (1) The employer shall ensure that sufficient space is provided around individual machines or process units in order to ensure the safety of employees while operations, adjustments or repairs are being carried out.

(2) Where an employee or the employee’s clothing might come into contact with moving parts of machinery, the employee shall
(a) wear close fitting clothing;
(b) confine head or facial hair; and
(c) avoid wearing dangling neckwear, jewellery, rings or similar items. * * The wearing of medic-alert bracelets is permitted when such bracelets are used with transparent rubber bands that fit snugly over the bracelets. (EC180/87)
Idem
Removal of lockout device
Activation
Contact with machinery
Clothing

30.9 (1) Subject to this section, an employer shall provide effective safeguards where an employee may come into contact with moving belts, rollers, gears, drive-shafts, keyways, pulleys, sprockets, chains, ropes, spindles, drums, counterweights, flywheels or couplings on machinery, pinchpoints and cutting edges.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to machinery that is equipped with an effective device which stops the machinery automatically when an employee comes into contact with the parts of it mentioned in subsection (1) or prevents an employee from coming in contact with parts mentioned in subsection (1).

(3) Where there is a possibility of machine failure that may result in an injury to an employee from flying objects, the employer shall install safeguards strong enough to contain or deflect the broken parts or particles of the machinery and flying particles of any product.

(4) The employer and employee shall not alter the design where machines are designed with guards that interlock with the machinery control so as to prevent operation of the machine unless the guard is in its proper place.

(5) Where it has been determined that an effective safeguard cannot be provided, the employer shall ensure that an alternative mechanism, system or change in work procedure, approved by an officer, is put into place to protect employees from being exposed to the hazards associated with the lack of the safeguard. (EC180/87)

30.10 (1) A person shall not remove or render ineffective a safeguard, other than a removable guardrail or gate, that is required by these regulations unless the removal or rendering ineffective is necessary to enable the effecting of maintenance or adjustments.

(2) Where a person has removed or rendered ineffective a safeguard, he shall ensure that
(a) the safeguard is replaced before he leaves the unguarded area; and
(b) the safeguard will function properly.

(3) Where a safeguard for machinery has been removed or rendered ineffective and the machinery cannot be directly controlled by the employee, the employee who removes or renders ineffective the safeguard shall lock-out and tag the machine according to section 30.7. (EC180/87)

30.11 (1) An employer shall ensure that
Safeguards
Idem
Screening employees
Alteration
Alternative
protection
Removing and rendering ineffective safeguards
Idem
Lock-out
Abrasive and grinding wheels

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following is © Gouvernement du Québec, 2009
c. S-2.1, r.19.01

Regulation respecting occupational health and safety
An Act respecting occupational health and safety

R.S.Q., c. S-2.1, s. 223. 1st par. subpar. (1), (3), (4), (7) to (16), (18) to (21.1), (41) and (42), 2nd par. and 3rd par

DIVISION I
INTERPRETATION AND SCOPE

1. Definitions: In this regulation, the following words and expressions mean:

“protective device”: set of devices which when used alone or with a protector on machinery, eliminates dangers or reduces risks for the health, safety and physical well-being of workers ;

DIVISION II
GENERAL PROVISIONS

3. Purpose: The purpose of this Regulation is to establish standards pertaining in particular to the quality of air, temperature, humidity, heat stress, lighting, noise and other contaminants, sanitary facilities, ventilation, hygiene, sanitation and cleanliness in establishments, area conditions, storage and handling of dangerous substances, machine and tool safety, certain high risk tasks, individual protective equipment and the transportation of workers to ensure the quality of the work environment, to safeguard the health of workers and to ensure their safety and physical well-being.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 3.

4. Employer’s obligations: The employer shall comply with the standards set hereunder, with the exception of those of section 339.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 4.

5. Operational status of equipment: Any equipment used or installed in an establishment for purposes of preventing the emission of gases, dusts, fumes and vapours, to ensure proper conditions for lighting, ventilation, temperature, salubrity and hygiene prescribed hereunder or to ensure that noise or heat stress conditions comply with the requirements hereunder, shall always be in operational condition and shall give optimal performance during the establishment’s business hours in such manner as to provide the performance for which it was designed.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 5.

DIVISION XXI
MACHINES

1. Protectors and protective devices

172. In this division as well as in section 323, «danger zone» means any zone situated inside or around a machine and which poses a risk for the health, safety or physical well-being of workers.

In this division as well as in sections 239 and 267, «protector» means the part of a machine used specifically to isolate a machine’s danger zone by means of a material barrier, such as a housing, a cover, a screen, a door or a cabinet.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 172.

173. Applicable provisions: Subsections 1 to 3 apply, with necessary adaptations, to all types of machines, subject to the provisions of subsections 4 to 9.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 173.

174. Permanent protector: A permanent protector is one that can only be removed with the assistance of a tool or is set in place permanently, for instance, by being welded.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 174.

175. Interlocking protector: A protector equipped with an interlocking device shall have the following features:

(1) it causes the stoppage of the machine or of the operation of its dangerous parts when it is moved ;

(2) it makes it impossible to start the machine or to operate its dangerous parts for as long as it is being moved ;

(3) it does not cause the machine or its dangerous parts to be restarted once it is restored to its place.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 175.

176. Interlocked protector : An interlocked protector equipped with an interlocking device shall have the following characteristics :

(1) it remains in place and is interlocked as long as the machine or its dangerous parts remain in operation ;

(2) it makes it impossible to start the machine or to operate its dangerous parts for as long as it has not been restored to its place and reactivated ;

(3) it does not cause the machine or its dangerous parts to be restarted once it is restored to its place and reactivated.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 176.

177. An automatic closing protector : An automatic closing protector is one that returns to its place automatically to isolate the worker completely from the danger zone, once the material that triggered its movement is removed from the machine.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 177.

178. Adjustable protector : An adjustable protector is one that shall be adjusted to the material in order to isolate the worker from the danger zone completely and at all times.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 178.

179. Sensor device: A sensor device is one that reacts by causing the elimination of risks associated with the danger zone, as soon as a worker approaches within a given distance of this zone.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 179.

180. Two-hand control: Any two-hand control shall have the following characteristics:

(1) it operates in such a manner that the worker shall use both hands to start the machine;

(2) it is designed and located to prevent involuntary or accidental operations;

(3) it is kept at a safe distance from the danger zone.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 180.

181. Multiple two-hand control: If one of the machine’s functions is started by more than one two-hand control, these controls shall be designed in such a manner that none of them can start the machine unless all the other controls are also activated and held in this same position.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 181.

182. Controlling the danger zone: Subject to section 183, a machine shall be designed and built so as to make its danger zone inaccessible, failing which it shall be equipped with at least one of the following protectors or protective devices:

(1) in the case where no one will have access to the machine’s danger zone while it is in operation:

(a) a permanent protector ;

(b) a protector fitted with an interlocking device ;

(c) an interlocked protector fitted with an interlocking device ;

(d) a sensor device ;

(2) in the case where at least one person will have access to the machine’s danger zone while it is in operation :

(a) a protector fitted with an interlocking device ;

(b) an interlocked protector fitted with an interlocking device ;

(c) an automatic closing protector ;

(d) an adjustable protector ;

(e) a sensor device ;

(f) a two-hand control.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 182.

183. Equivalent safety precautions: Section 182 does not apply when it is foreseeable that the effects of installing a protector or a protective device on a machine will make the operations for which it was designed reasonably impractical, notably a snow blower, a railway switch or a medical appliance intended to act directly on a patient.

In this case, the employer shall take precautions that ensure the equivalent safety of workers, namely with respect to the organization of the work, worker training, the machine’s operating conditions and operating modes, and individual protective means and equipment that take into account the absence of a protector or of a protective device.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 183.

184. Installation: Subject to section 186, before operating a machine, the protectors shall be installed or the protective devices shall be operational.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 184.

185. Making secure: Subject to the provisions of section 186, before undertaking any maintenance, repair or unjamming work in a machine’s danger zone, the following safety precautions shall be taken:

(1) turn the machine’s power supply switch to the off position;

(2) bring the machine to a complete stop;

(3) each person exposed to danger locks off all the machine’s sources of energy in order to avoid any accidental start-up of the machine for the duration of the work.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 185.

186. Adjustment, repair, unjamming, maintenance and apprenticeship: When a worker must access a machine’s danger zone for adjustment, unjamming, maintenance, apprenticeship or repair purposes, including for detecting abnormal operations, and to do so, he must move or remove a protector, or neutralize a protective device, the machine shall only be restarted by means of a manual control or in compliance with a safety procedure specifically provided for allowing such access. This manual control or this procedure shall have the following characteristics:

(1) it causes any other control mode or any other procedure, as the case may be, to become inoperative;

(2) it only allows the operating of the dangerous parts of the machine by a control device requiring continuous action or a two-hand control device;

(3) it only allows the operation of these dangerous parts under enhanced security conditions, for instance, at low speed, under reduced tension, step-by-step or by separate steps.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 186.

187. Characteristics of a protector: A protector or a protective device shall not:

(1) cause additional risks for workers;

(2) be in itself a source of danger, for instance due to the presence of cutting edges, irregularities or burrs.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 187.

188. Spare part: When a protector or a protective device is replaced, the spare protector or protective device shall offer safety features at least equivalent to those of the original part.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 188.

2. Control devices or switches

189. Control devices and switches: Control devices and switches shall be designed, installed and maintained so as to avoid the accidental start-up or shut-down of a machine.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 189.

190. Start and stop switches: Each machine shall be equipped with a control device or switch making it possible to start and stop the machine under safe conditions.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 190.

191. Warning device: When the starting up of a machine constitutes a danger for anyone near the machine, a warning device or any other effective means of communication shall announce the starting up of the machine.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 191.

192. Emergency stop: Subject to section 270, any machine whose operation requires the presence of at least one worker, shall be equipped with an emergency stopping device or switch.

This device or switch stops the machine, considering the machine’s design, in the shortest possible time. In addition, it has the following characteristics:

(1) it is easily visible and within reach of the worker;

(2) one single action activates it;

(3) it is clearly identified.

The resetting of the emergency stopping device after it is used, shall not by itself cause the machine to start up.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 192.

193. Groups of machines: Any stopping device or switch for a machine belonging to a group of machines that are wired to operate in series, including an emergency shut-off switch, shall in addition be designed to stop serial upstream and downstream machines if their operations constitute a danger for worker safety.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 193.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be use for any other purpose.

The following is Copyright©2009 The Queen’s Printer, Saskatchewan

The Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, 1996
PART X

Machine Safety
Operation by workers

134(1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that:
(a) machines are operated only by a competent worker; and
(b) workers are informed of any risk associated with, and trained in the safe use of, the machines.

(2) Before starting a machine, an operator shall ensure that neither the operator nor any other worker will be endangered by starting the machine.

(3) Where a worker or a worker’s clothing may contact a moving part of a machine, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the worker:
(a) wears close-fitting clothing;
(b) confines or cuts short any head and facial hair; and
(c) does not wear dangling neckwear or jewellery, rings or other similar items.
4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s134.

Operating controls

135(1) Where reasonably practicable, an employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that operating controls on machines:
(a) are located within easy reach of the operator; and
(b) cannot be activated by accidental contact.

(2) Where reasonably practicable, an employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that stopping devices on machines are:
(a) located in the direct view and within easy reach of the operator; and
(b) readily identifiable.

(3) Where a worker is required to feed material into a material-forming press, punch, shear or similar machine, an employer, contractor or supplier shall:
(a) where practicable, install a positive means to prevent the activation of the machine while any part of the worker’s body could be injured by moving parts of the machine; or
(b) where it is not practicable to comply with clause (a), install safeguards to prevent the worker from contacting a moving part of the machine.
4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s135.

Unattended and suspended machines
136(1) An employer or contractor shall not require or permit a worker to leave unattended or in a suspended position any machine or any part of a machine unless the machine or part has been:
(a) immobilized and secured against accidental movement; or
(b) enclosed by a safeguard to prevent access by any other worker to the machine or part.

(2) A worker shall not leave unattended or in a suspended position any machine or any part of a machine unless the machine or part has been:
(a) immobilized and secured against accidental movement; or (b) enclosed by a safeguard to prevent access by any other worker to the machine or part.
4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s136.

Safeguards

137(1) Except where otherwise provided by these regulations, an employer or contractor shall provide an effective safeguard where a worker may contact:
(a) a dangerous moving part of a machine;
(b) a pinch point, cutting edge or point of a machine at which material is cut, shaped, bored or formed;
(c) an open flame;
(d) a steam pipe or other surface with a temperature that exceeds or may exceed 80° Celsius; or
(e) a cooled surface that is or may be less than minus 80° Celsius.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a safeguard required by subsection (1) remains in place at all times.

(3) Subsection (1) does not apply to:
(a) a machine that is equipped with an effective safety device that stops the machine automatically before any part of a worker’s body comes into contact with a hazard mentioned in clause (1)(a) or (b); or
(b) a belt, rope or chain that is operated from a cathead or capstan.

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a safeguard that is removed from a machine or made ineffective to permit maintenance, testing, repair or adjustment of a machine is replaced or made effective before a worker is required or permitted to use the machine.

(5) Where there is a possibility of machine failure and of injury to a worker resulting from the failure, an employer or contractor shall install safeguards that are strong enough to withstand the impact of debris from the machine failure and to contain any debris resulting from the failure.
4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s137.

Warning systems

138(1) Where the circumstances described in subsection

(2) exist, an employer or contractor shall install:
(a) an audible alarm system that provides a warning of sufficient volume and for a sufficient period before start-up of the machine to give workers timely notice of the imminent start-up; or
(b) a distinctive and conspicuous visual warning system to alert workers of the imminent start-up of the machine.

(2) Subsection (1) applies where:
(a) a worker may be endangered by moving machine parts when a machine is started; and
(b) the operator of the machine does not have a clear view from the operating position of all parts of the machine and of the surrounding area in which there is a potential danger.

(3) An employer or contractor shall place adequate, appropriate and clearly visible warning signs at each point of access to a machine that starts automatically.
4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s138.

Locking out

139(1) Subject to section 140, before a worker undertakes the maintenance, repair, test or adjustment of a machine other than a power tool, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the machine is locked out and remains locked out during that activity if not doing so would put the worker at risk.

(2) Before a worker undertakes the maintenance, repair, test or adjustment of a power tool, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the energy source has been isolated from the power tool, any residual energy in the power tool has been dissipated and the energy source remains isolated during that activity.

(3) An employer or contractor shall:
(a) provide a written lock-out process to each worker who is required to work on a machine to which subsection (1) applies; and
(b) where the lockout process uses a lock and key, issue to that worker a lock that is operable only by that worker’s key and a duplicate key.

(4) Where the lockout process does not use a lock and key, an employer or contractor shall designate a person to co-ordinate and control the lockout process.

(5) Where the lockout process uses a lock and key, an employer or contractor shall designate a person to keep the duplicate key mentioned in clause (3)(b) and ensure that:
(a) the duplicate key is accessible only to the designated person; and
(b) a log book is kept to record the use of the duplicate key and the reasons for that use.

(6) Where it is not practicable to use a worker’s key to remove a lock, an employer or contractor may permit the person designated pursuant to subsection (5) to remove the lock if the designated person:
(a) has determined the reason that the worker’s key is not available;
(b) has determined that it is safe to remove the lock and activate the machine; and
(c) if a committee or representative is in place, has informed the co-chairpersons or the representative of the proposed use of the duplicate key before it is used.

(7) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a designated person who is permitted to use a duplicate key pursuant to subsection (6):
(a) records in the log book the use of the duplicate key, the reason for its use and the date of its use; and
(b) signs the log book each time that the duplicate key is used.

(8) Where a central automated system controls more than one machine, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the machine to be maintained, repaired, tested or adjusted is isolated from the central system before the lock-out procedures required by subsection (3) are implemented.

(9) Before undertaking any maintenance, repairs, tests or adjustments to a machine to which subsection (1) applies, a worker shall lock out the machine following the process mentioned in clause (3)(a).

(10) After a lock-out device has been installed or a lockout process has been initiated, the worker who installed the first lock or initiated the process shall check the machine to ensure that the machine is inoperative.

(11) No person shall deactivate a lockout process that does not use a lock and key except the person designated pursuant to subsection (4).

(12) No person shall remove a lock-out device except the worker who installed the lock-out device or the designated person acting in accordance with subsection (6).
4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s139.

Cleaning, etc., of machine or other equipment in motion

140(1) This section applies where any of the following requires cleaning, lubrication or adjustment while all or any part of a machine or other piece of equipment is in motion or under power:
(a) the machine or other piece of equipment;
(b) a part of the machine or of the piece of other equipment; or
(c) any material on the machine or on the piece of equipment.

(2) In the circumstances mentioned in subsection (1), an employer or contractor shall:
(a) develop and implement written work practices and procedures that ensure that the cleaning, lubrication or adjustment is carried out in a safe manner;
(b) ensure that workers who are required to perform the cleaning, lubrication or adjustment are trained in the written work practices and procedures mentioned in clause (a); and
(c) ensure that a copy of the written work practices and procedures mentioned in clause (a) is readily available for reference by workers.
10 Aug 2007 SR 67/2007 s14.

Belts

141(1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a permanent belt shifter is:
(a) provided for all loose pulleys on any machine; and
(b) constructed so that the belt cannot creep back on to the tight pulley.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker does not shift a belt on a machine by hand while the belt is in motion.
4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s141.

Air-actuated fastening tools

142 An employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker does not hold the trigger of an air-actuated fastening tool mechanically in the operating position unless the tool is specifically designed to be used in that manner.
4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s142.

Explosive-actuated fastening tools

143(1) In this section, “explosive-actuated fastening tool” means a machine that propels or discharges, by means of an explosive force, a fastening device to attach the fastening device on, affix the fastening device to or cause the fastening device to penetrate another object or material.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker who operates explosive- actuated fastening tool systems is trained in and uses safe work procedures for any explosive-actuated fastening tool that the worker may operate, including: (a) the selection of the appropriate tool, accessories, fastener and power load for each application; (b) the limitations of each type of tool, fastener and power load; and (c) the maintenance, inspection and use of the tool.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker who operates an explosive-actuated fastening tool:
(a) does not leave the tool or explosive charges unattended;
(b) stores the tool and explosive charges in a locked container when not in use; and
(c) uses an industrial eye or face protector that meets the requirements of Part VII.
4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s143.

Airless spray units

144 Where a worker is required or permitted to use an airless spray unit that is capable of operating at a pressure greater than seven megapascals, an employer or contractor shall ensure that:
(a) the gun, the reservoir and the pump are bonded to ground with a single continuous approved bonding conductor; and
(b) the gun is fitted with suitable tip and trigger guards.
4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s144.

Grinding machines

145(1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that:
(a) no abrasive wheel is operated:
(i) unless it is equipped with blotters installed according to the manufacturer’s recommendations and a safeguard; or
(ii) at a speed in excess of the manufacturer’s recommendations;
(b) the maximum speed of each grinder shaft in revolutions per minute is permanently marked on the grinder; and
(c) the mounting flanges for an abrasive wheel have an equal and correct diameter for the wheel.

(2) Where a tool rest is installed on a fixed grinder, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the tool rest is:
(a) installed in a manner that is compatible with the work process;
(b) securely attached to the grinder; and
(c) set not more than three millimetres from the face of the wheel or below the horizontal centre line of the wheel.

(3) An employer or contractor shall not require or permit a worker to use the sides of an abrasive wheel for grinding unless the abrasive wheel is designed for that use.

(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker who operates a grinder:
(a) is provided with and uses the following personal protective equipment that meets the requirements of Part VII:
(i) an industrial eye or face protector;
(ii) hand or arm protection; and
(b) is instructed in the potential hazards and safe use of the grinder.
4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s145.

Chain saws

146(1) An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that a chain saw is:
(a) equipped with an effective chain brake or a chain and bar that is designed to minimize the possibility of a kickback; and
(b) designed and constructed so that the chain stops when the engine is at idle.

(2) Where a chain saw is to be used by a worker operating from an elevated cage or basket, the width of which is less than twice the length of the chain saw, an employer or contractor shall ensure that a secondary platform is installed outside the cage or basket and is used to store the chain saw and to start the chain saw engine.

(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker who operates a chain saw:
(a) stops the chain while the worker is walking with the saw;
(b) does not operate the saw at a height that is higher than the worker’s shoulder level;
(c) holds the saw firmly in both hands while operating the saw; and (d) maintains the chain saw, cutting chain and safeguards in safe operating condition.

(4) A worker who operates a chain saw:
(a) shall stop the chain while the worker is walking with the saw;
(b) shall not operate the saw at a height that is higher than the worker’s shoulder level;
(c) shall hold the saw firmly in both hands while operating the saw;
(d) shall maintain the chain saw, cutting chain and safeguards in safe operating condition; and
(e) shall maintain the chain saw so that the chain stops when the engine is at idle.
4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s146.

Circular saws

147(1) Subject to subsection (2), where a circular saw blade develops a crack in the outside diameter of the saw blade, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the blade is discarded unless:
(a) the blade is effectively repaired by a competent person; and
(b) the original blade tension is restored.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a circular saw blade that develops a crack from the eye or the collar is discarded.

(3) An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that a portable hand-operated circular saw is equipped with a safeguard that will automatically cover the exposed part of the blade during use and the entire blade when the saw is not in use.
4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s147.

Power-fed circular saws

148(1) An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that a power-fed circular rip saw with horizontal, power-driven feed rolls is equipped with a sectional nonkickback device located in front of the saw blade and across the full width of the rolls.

(2) An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that a power-fed circular rip saw:
(a) is equipped with a splitter that extends to the height of the top of the saw blade; and
(b) has a saw blade that is equipped with a safeguard or located so that a worker cannot reach it.
4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s148.

Band-saws

149(1) Where a band-saw blade develops a crack the depth of which is more than 5% of the width of the saw blade, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the blade is discarded unless:
(a) the width of the blade is reduced so as to eliminate the crack; or
(b) the cracked section is repaired by a competent person.

(2) An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that a band-saw has an automatic tension control device.
4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s149.

Cut-off saws

150 An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that:
(a) a hand-operated, sliding or swing cut-off saw is equipped with a device that will return the saw automatically to the back of the table when the saw is released at any point in the saw’s travel; and
(b) a limit device is installed on a swing or sliding cut-off saw to prevent the saw from travelling beyond the outside edge of the cutting table.
4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s150.

Pushblocks and pushsticks

151(1) In this section:
(a) “pushblock” means a short block of wood with a shoulder at the rear that is provided with a suitable handle that will engage with the shoulder;
(b) “pushstick” means a narrow strip of wood or other suitable material with a notch cut into one end.

(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker uses a pushstick or pushblock to feed wood or other material into any machine that is used for cutting or shaping the wood or other material.
4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s151.

Hand-fed planers and joiners

152(1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a hand-fed planer or joiner is operated at a height that is suitable for the worker who operates it.

(2) An employer, contractor or supplier shall ensure that a hand-fed planer or joiner with a horizontal cutting head has an automatic safeguard that will cover all sections of the head on the working side of the safeguard when material is not being cut.
4 Oct 96 cO-1.1 Reg 1 s152.

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