Fall protection training

Fall Protection Training Online

20% of injuries in the workplace can be attributed to falls. With Fall Protection and Fall Arrest training, your employees will be safer, your business will be more efficient, and your liability and risk will decrease. The right Fall Arrest/Protection training can make a huge difference.

  • Pricing

  • 1-10 units: $32.95
  • 11-25 units: $30.95
  • 26-50 units: $27.95
  • 51-100 units: $25.95
  • 101-500 units: $22.95
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Our Fall Protection Training online provides better cost savings and more flexibility than in-class training. This course is designed to provide a foundation for learning employee responsibility and caution when working from heights is required. If fall hazards exist in your workplace, this course will help employees protect their own safety using Travel Restraint Systems, roof fall protection, safety nets, a fall protection harness, and much more. Both Fall Arrest and Fall Protection programs are covered.

  • Fall Protection and Fall Arrest Systems
  • General Responsibilities
  • Fall Arrest Systems
  • Fall Hazards and Controls
  • Inspection of Equipment
  • Donning a Harness

Who Needs Fall Protection Training?

Do your employees work in areas where fall hazards exist? Are you unfamiliar with both local and federal Fall Protection programs? Do you have the required safety nets, lifelines, and anchors for your employees? Are you experience time loss due to poor fall protection? You and your employees can benefit from our Fall Protection and Fall Arrest online training modules. A single course provides both comprehensive education and a 2-Year Fall Protection certificate.

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Fall Protection and Fall Arrest Systems

  • Lost time injuries & statistics
  • Fall Prevention versus Fall Arrest
  • Travel restraints
  • Fall arrest systems

General Responsibilities

  • Employers & Supervisors Workers General precautions & safe working procedures

Fall Arrest Systems

  • Anchorage or tie-off points, D plate body harness, CSA standards, D ring connecting devices, lifelines, shock absorbing lanyards, horizontal & vertical lifelines

Fall Hazards and Controls

  • Hazards due to pendulum swings
  • Planning guidelines, anchor points
  • Rescue plans

Inspection of Equipment

  • Harness, buckles, nylon straps, webbing, friction buckles, self retracting devices

Donning a Harness

  • Step by step instructions
  • Care, cleaning, life expectancy
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All our online training meets provincial and federal regulations. For specific outlines please select your province below.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following is © 1995 – 2010 Government of Alberta.

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE 2009

Definitions:
“fall protection system” means

a personal fall arrest system,
a travel restraint system,
fabric or netting panels intended for leading edge protection,
a safety net,
a control zone,
use of procedures in place of fall protection equipment, or
another system approved by a Director of Inspection;
“fall restrict equipment” means a component of a fall restrict system that, when combined with other subcomponents and elements, allows the climber of a wood pole to remain at his or her work position with both hands free, and that performs a limited fall arrest function when the climber loses contact between his or her spurs and the pole;

“fall restrict system” means a combination of a work positioning system and fall restrict equipment;

“horizontal lifeline system” means a system composed of a synthetic or wire rope, secured horizontally between 2 or more anchor points, to which a worker attaches a personal fall arrest system or travel restraint system;

“total fall distance” means the vertical distance from the point at which a worker falls to the point where the fall stops after all personal fall arrest system components have extended;

“work positioning system” means a system of components attached to a vertical safety line and including a full body harness, descent controllers and positioning lanyards used to support or suspend a worker in tension at a work position;

Part 9 Fall Protection

Rescue personnel exemption
138 rescue personnel involved in training or in providing emergency rescue services may use equipment and practices other than those specified in this part.

General protection
139(1) Subject to subsections (3) through (8), an employer must ensure that a worker is protected from falling at a temporary or permanent work area if a worker may fall
(a) a vertical distance of 3 metres or more,
(b) a vertical distance of less than 3 metres if there is an unusual possibility of injury, or
(c) into or onto a hazardous substance or object, or through an opening in a work surface.
139(2) For the purposes of this section, there is an unusual possibility of injury if the injury may be worse than an injury from landing on a solid, flat surface.
139(3) To meet the requirement under subsection (1), an employer must install an engineering control such as a guardrail.
139(4) Despite subsection (3), an employer must ensure that a worker at a permanent work area is protected from falling by a guardrail if the worker may fall a vertical distance of more than 1.2 metres and less than 3 metres.
139(5) Despite subsections (3) and (4), if the use of a guardrail is not reasonably practicable, an employer must ensure that a worker uses a travel restraint system that meets the requirements of this Part.
139(6) Despite subsection (5), if the use of a travel restraint system is not reasonably practicable, an employer must ensure that a worker uses a personal fall arrest system that meets the requirements of this Part.
139(7) Despite subsection (6), if the use of a personal fall arrest system is not reasonably practicable, an employer must ensure that a worker uses an equally effective fall protection system that meets the requirements of this Part.
139(8) A worker must use or wear the fall protection system the employer requires the worker to use or wear in compliance with this Code.

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Fall protection plan
140(1) An employer must develop procedures that comply with this Part in a fall protection plan for a work site if a worker at the work site may fall 3 metres or more and the worker is not protected by guardrails.
140(2) A fall protection plan must specify
(a) the fall hazards at the work site,
(b) the fall protection system to be used at the work site,
(c) the anchors to be used during the work,
(d) that clearance distances below the work area, if applicable, have been confirmed as sufficient to prevent a worker from striking the ground or an object or level below the work area,
(e) the procedures used to assemble, maintain, inspect, use and disassemble the fall protection system, where applicable, and
(f) the rescue procedures to be used if a worker falls and is suspended by a personal fall arrest system or safety net and needs to be rescued.
140(3) The employer must ensure that the fall protection plan is available at the work site and is reviewed with workers before work with a risk of falling begins.
140(4) The employer must ensure that the plan is updated when conditions affecting fall protection change.

Instruction of workers
141(1) An employer must ensure that a worker is trained in the safe use of the fall protection system before allowing the worker to work in an area where a fall protection system must be used.
141(2) The training referred to in subsection (1) must include the following:
(a) a review of current Alberta legislation pertaining to fall protection;
(b) an understanding of what a fall protection plan is;
(c) fall protection methods a worker is required to use at a work site;
(d) identification of fall hazards;
(e) assessment and selection of specific anchors that the worker may use;
(f) instructions for the correct use of connecting hardware;
(g) information about the effect of a fall on the human body, including
(i) maximum arresting force,
(ii) the purpose of shock and energy absorbers,
(iii) swing fall,
(iv) free fall;
(h) pre use inspection;

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(i) emergency response procedures to be used at the work site, if necessary; and
(j) practice in
(i) inspecting, fitting, adjusting and connecting fall protection systems and components, and
(ii) emergency response procedures.
141(3) In addition to the training described in subsection (2), an employer must ensure that a worker is made aware of the fall hazards particular to that work site and the steps being taken to eliminate or control those hazards.

Full body harness
142(1) An employer must ensure that
(a) a full body harness manufactured on or after July1, 2009 is approved to
(i) CSA Standard CAN/CSA Z259.10 06, Full Body Harnesses,
(ii) ANSI/ASSE Standard Z359.1 2007, Safety requirements for personal fall arrest systems, subsystems and components, or
(iii) CEN Standard EN 361: 2007, Personal protective equipment against falls from a height — Full body harnesses, and
(b) a worker using a personal fall arrest system wears and uses a full body harness.
142(2) A worker using a personal fall arrest system must wear and use a full body harness.

Body belt
142.1 An employer must ensure that
(a) a body belt manufactured on or after July1, 2009 is approved to
(i) CSA Standard Z259.1 05, Body belts and saddles for work positioning and travel restraint,
(ii) ANSI/ASSE Standard A10.32 2004, Fall Protection Systems – American National Standard for Construction and Demolition Operations, or
(iii) CEN Standard EN 358: 2000, Personal protective equipment for work positioning and prevention of falls from a height — Belts for work positioning and restraint and work positioning lanyards, and
(b) a worker uses a body belt only as part of a travel restraint system or as part of a fall restrict system.

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Lanyard
142.2(1) An employer must ensure that a lanyard manufactured on or after July1,
2009 is approved to
(a) CSA Standard Z259.11 05, Energy absorbers and lanyards,
(b) ANSI/ASSE Standard Z359.1 2007, Safety requirements for personal fall arrest systems, subsystems and components, or
(c) CEN Standard EN 354: 2002, Personal protective equipment against falls from a height — Lanyards.
142.2(2) An employer must ensure that a lanyard used by a worker is made of wire rope or other material appropriate to the hazard if a tool or corrosive agent that could sever, abrade or burn a lanyard is used in the work area.
142.2(3) Despite subsection (2), if a worker works near an energized conductor or in a work area where a lanyard made of conductive material cannot be used safely, the employer must ensure that the worker uses another effective means of fall protection.

Shock absorber
142.3(1) An employer must ensure that if a shock absorber or shock absorbing lanyard is used as part of a personal fall arrest system, it is approved to one of the following standards if manufactured on or after July1, 2009:
(a) CSA Standard Z259.11 05, Energy absorbers and lanyards;
(b) ANSI/ASSE Standard Z359.1 2007, Safety requirements for personal fall arrest systems, subsystems and components; or
(c) CEN Standard EN 355: 2002, Personal protective equipment against falls from a height – Energy absorbers.
142.3(2) An employer must ensure that a personal fall arrest system consists of a full body harness and a lanyard equipped with a shock absorber or similar device.
142.3(3) Despite subsection (2), a shock absorber or similar device is not required if the personal fall arrest system is used in accordance with section 151.
142.3(4) Despite subsection (2), a shock absorber is required with a fixed ladder fall arrest system only if it is required by the manufacturer of the system.

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Connectors, carabiners and snap hooks
143(1) An employer must ensure that connecting components of a fall arrest system consisting of carabiners, D rings, O rings, oval rings, self locking connectors and snap hooks manufactured on or after July1, 2009 are approved, as applicable, to
(a) CSA Standard Z259.12 01 (R2006), Connecting Components for Personal Fall Arrest Systems (PFAS),
(b) ANSI/ASSE Standard Z359.1 2007, Safety requirements for personal fall arrest systems, subsystems and components,
(c) CEN Standard EN 362: 2004, Personal protective equipment against falls from a height – Connectors, or
(d) CEN Standard 12275: 1998, Mountaineering equipment – Connectors –

Safety requirements and test methods.
143(2) An employer must ensure that a carabiner or snap hook
(a) is self closing and self locking,
(b) may only be opened by at least two consecutive deliberate manual actions, and
(c) is marked with
(i) its breaking strength in the major axis, and
(ii) the name or trademark of the manufacturer.

Fall arresters
144 An employer must ensure that a fall arrestor manufactured on or after July1, 2009 is approved to
(a) CSA Standard Z259.2.1 98 (R2004), Fall Arresters, Vertical Lifelines, and Rails,
(b) ANSI/ASSE Standard Z359.1 2007, Safety requirements for personal fall arrest systems, subsystems and components, or
(c) CEN Standard EN 353 2: 2002, Personal protective equipment against falls from a height – Part 2: Guided type fall arrestors including a flexible anchor line.

Self retracting device
145 An employer must ensure that a self retracting device manufactured on or after July1, 2009 and used with a personal fall arrest system is
(a) approved to CSA Standard Z259.2.2 98 (R2004), Self Retracting Devices for Personal Fall Arrest Systems,
(b) anchored above the worker’s head unless the manufacturer’s specifications allow the use of a different anchor location, and

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(c) used in a manner that minimizes the hazards of swinging and limits the swing drop distance to 1.2 metres if a worker falls.

Descent control device
146 An employer must ensure that an automatic or manual descent control device manufactured on or after July1, 2009 and used with a personal fall arrest system is approved to
(a) CSA Standard Z259.2.3 99 (R2004), Descent Control Devices,
(b) CEN Standard EN 341: 1997, Personal protective equipment against falls from a height – Descender devices, or
(c) NFPA Standard 1983, Standard on Life Safety Rope and Equipment for Emergency Services, 2006 edition, classified as general or light duty.

Life safety rope
147(1) An employer must ensure that a life safety rope manufactured on or after July1, 2009 and used in a fall protection system
(a) is approved to
(i) NFPA Standard 1983, Standard on Life Safety Rope and Equipment for Emergency Services, 2006 Edition, as light use or general use life safety rope,
(ii) CEN Standard EN 1891: 1998, Personal protective equipment for the prevention of falls from a height — Low stretch kernmantle ropes, as Type A rope, or
(b) meets the requirements of
(i) CSA Standard CAN/CSA Z259.2.1 98 (R2004), Fall Arresters, Vertical Lifelines, and Rails, or
(ii) ANSI/ASSE Standard Z359.1 2007, Safety requirements for personal fall arrest systems, subsystems and components.
147(2) An employer must ensure that a life safety rope used in a fall protection system
(a) extends downward to within 1.2 metres of ground level or another safe lower surface,
(b) is free of knots or splices throughout the travel portion except for a stopper knot at its lower end,
(c) is effectively protected to prevent abrasion by sharp or rough edges,
(d) is made of material appropriate to the hazard and able to withstand adverse effects, and
(e) is installed and used in a manner that minimizes the hazards of swinging and limits the swing drop distance to 1.2 metres if a worker falls.

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147(3) A worker must use a vertical life safety rope in a manner that minimizes the hazards of swinging and limits the swing drop distance to 1.2 metres if a worker falls.
147(4) An employer must ensure that only one worker is attached to a life safety rope at any one time unless the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer allow for the attachment of more than one worker.

Adjustable lanyard for work positioning
148 An employer must ensure that an adjustable lanyard manufactured on or after July1, 2009 and used by a worker as part of a work positioning system is approved to
(a) CSA Standard Z259.11 05, Energy absorbers and lanyards, as a Class F adjustable positioning lanyard, or
(b) CEN Standard EN 358: 2000, Personal protective equipment for work positioning and prevention of falls from a height — Belts for work positioning and restraint and work positioning lanyards.

Rope adjustment device for work positioning
148.1 An employer must ensure that a rope adjustment device manufactured on or after July1, 2009 and used by a worker as part of a work positioning system is approved to
(a) CSA Standard Z259.2.3 99 (R2004), Descent Control Devices,
(b) CEN Standard EN 341: 1997, Personal protective equipment against falls from a height – Descender devices, or
(c) NFPA Standard 1983, Standard on Life Safety Rope and Equipment for Emergency Services, 2006 Edition, classified as general or light duty.

Wood pole climbing
149(1) An employer must ensure that a worker working on or from a wood pole uses fall restrict equipment that is approved to CSA Standard Z259.14 01, Fall Restrict Equipment for Wood Pole Climbing, in combination with
(a) a lineman’s body belt that
(i) is approved to CSA Standard Z259.3‐M1978 (R2003), Lineman’s Body Belt and Lineman’s Safety Strap, or
(ii) complies with section 142.1, or
(b) a full body harness that complies with subsection 142(1).

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149(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to fall restrict equipment or a lineman’s body belt in use before April 30, 2004.

Equipment compatibility
150 An employer must ensure that all components of a fall protection system are compatible with one another and with the environment in which they are used.

Inspection and maintenance
150.1 An employer must ensure that the equipment used as part of a fall protection system is
(a) inspected by the worker as required by the manufacturer before it is used on each work shift,
(b) kept free from substances and conditions that could contribute to deterioration of the equipment, and
(c) re certified as specified by the manufacturer.

Removal from service
150.2(1) An employer must ensure that equipment used as part of a fall protection system is removed from service and either returned to the manufacturer or destroyed if
(a) it is defective, or
(b) it has come into contact with excessive heat, a chemical, or any other substance that may corrode or otherwise damage the fall protection system.
150.2(2) An employer must ensure that after a personal fall arrest system has stopped a fall, the system is removed from service.
150.2(3) An employer must ensure that a personal fall arrest system that is removed from service is not returned to service unless a professional engineer or the manufacturer certifies that the system is safe to use.

Prusik and similar knots
150.3 An employer must ensure that a Prusik or similar sliding hitch knot is used in place of a fall arrester only during emergency situations or during training for emergency situations and only by a competent worker.

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Clearance, maximum arresting force and swing
151(1) An employer must ensure that a personal fall arrest system is arranged so that a worker cannot hit the ground, an object which poses an unusual possibility of injury, or a level below the work area.
151(2) An employer must ensure that a personal fall arrest system without a shock absorber limits a worker’s free fall distance to 1.2 metres.
151(3) An employer must ensure that a personal fall arrest system limits the maximum arresting force on a worker to 6 kilonewtons, unless the worker is using an E6 type shock absorber in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, in which case the maximum arresting force must not exceed 8 kilonewtons.
151(4) A worker must limit the vertical distance of a fall by
(a) selecting the shortest length lanyard that will still permit unimpeded performance of the worker’s duties, and
(b) securing the lanyard to an anchor no lower than the worker’s shoulder height.
151(5) If the shoulder height anchor required by subsection 4(b) is not available, a worker must secure the lanyard to an anchor that is located as high as is reasonably practicable.
151(6) If it is not reasonably practicable to attach to an anchor above the level of a worker’s feet, the worker must ensure that the clearance and maximum arresting force requirements of subsections (1) and (3) are met.

Anchors

Anchor strength — permanent
152(1) An employer must ensure that a permanent anchor is capable of safely withstanding the impact forces applied to it and has a minimum breaking strength per attached worker of 16 kilonewtons or two times the maximum arresting force in any direction in which the load may be applied.
152(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to anchors installed before July1, 2009.
152(3) Subsection (1) does not apply to the anchors of flexible horizontal lifeline systems that must meet the requirements of subsection 153(1).

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152(4) The employer must ensure that an anchor rated at two times the maximum arresting force is designed, installed and used in accordance with
(a) the manufacturer’s specifications, or
(b) specifications certified by a professional engineer.

Anchor strength — temporary
152.1(1) An employer must ensure that a temporary anchor used in a travel restraint system
(a) has a minimum breaking strength in any direction in which the load may be applied of at least 3.5 kilonewtons per worker attached,
(b) is installed, used and removed according to the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer,
(c) is permanently marked as being for travel restraint only, and
(d) is removed from use on the earliest of
(i) the date on which the work project for which it is intended is completed, or
(ii) the time specified by the manufacturer or professional engineer.
152.1(2) An employer must ensure that a temporary anchor used in a personal fall arrest system
(a) has a minimum breaking strength in any direction in which the load may be applied of at least 16 kilonewtons or two times the maximum arresting force per worker attached,
(b) is installed, used and removed according to the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, and,
(c) is removed from use on the earliest of
(i) the date on which the work project for which it is intended is completed, or
(ii) the time specified by the manufacturer or professional engineer.

Duty to use anchors
152.2(1) If a worker uses a personal fall arrest system or a travel restraint system, the worker must ensure that it is safely secured to an anchor that meets the requirements of this Part.
152.2(2) An employer must ensure that a worker visually inspects the anchor prior to attaching a fall protection system.

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152.2(3) An employer must ensure that a worker does not use a damaged anchor until the anchor is repaired, replaced or re certified by the manufacturer or a professional engineer.
152.2(4) An employer must ensure that a worker uses an anchor connector appropriate to the work.
152.2(5) A worker must use an anchor connector appropriate to the work, Independence of anchors
152.3 An employer must ensure that an anchor to which a personal fall arrest system is attached is not part of an anchor used to support or suspend a platform.

Wire rope sling as anchor
152.4 An employer must ensure that a wire rope sling used as an anchor is terminated at both ends with a Flemish eye splice rated to at least 90 percent of the wire rope’s minimum breaking strength.

Flexible and rigid horizontal lifeline systems
153(1) An employer must ensure that a flexible horizontal lifeline system manufactured on or after July1, 2009 meets the requirements of
(a) CSA Standard Z259.13 04, Flexible Horizontal Lifeline Systems, or
(b) the applicable requirements of CSA Standard Z259.16 04, Design of Active Fall Protection Systems.
153(2) An employer must ensure that a rigid horizontal fall protection system is designed, installed and used in accordance with
(a) the manufacturer’s specifications, or
(b) specifications certified by a professional engineer.

Installation of horizontal lifeline systems
153.1 An employer must ensure that before a horizontal lifeline system is used, a professional engineer, a competent person authorized by the professional engineer, the manufacturer, or a competent person authorized by the manufacturer certifies that the system has been properly installed according to the manufacturer’s specifications or to specifications certified by a professional engineer.

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Fixed ladders and climbable structures
154(1) An employer must ensure that if a worker is working from or on a fixed ladder or climbable structure at a height of 3 metres or more and is not protected by a guardrail, continuous protection from falling is provided by
(a) equipping the fixed ladder or climbable structure with an integral fall protection system that meets the requirements of
(i) CSA Standard Z259.2.1 98 (R2004), Fall Arresters, Vertical Lifelines, and Rails, or
(ii) ANSI/ASSE Standard Z359.1 2007, Safety requirements for personal fall arrest systems, subsystems and components, or
(b) an alternate fall protection system.
154(2) Subsection (1) applies to fixed ladders and climbable structures constructed and installed after July1, 2009.

Fall protection on vehicles and loads
155(1) If a worker may have to climb onto a vehicle or its load at any location where it is not reasonably practicable to provide a fall protection system for the worker, an employer must
(a) take steps to eliminate or reduce the need for the worker to climb onto the vehicle or its load, and
(b) ensure that the requirements of subsection 159(2) are met.
155(2) In addition to the requirements of subsection (1), an employer must ensure that if a load is not secured against movement, a worker does not climb onto the load.
155(3) A worker must not climb onto a load if the load is not secured against movement.

Boom-supported work platforms and aerial devices
156(1) An employer must ensure that a worker on a boom supported elevating work platform, boom supported aerial device, or forklift truck work platform uses a personal fall arrest system
(a) connected to
(i) an anchor specified by the manufacturer of the work platform, aerial device or forklift truck, or
(ii) if no anchor is specified by the manufacturer, an anchor point certified by a professional engineer that meets the requirements of CSA Standard Z259.16 04, Design of Active Fall Protection Systems, and

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(b) when connected to the anchor, the lanyard, if reasonably practicable, is short enough to prevent the worker from being ejected from the work platform or aerial device but is long enough to allow the worker to perform his or her work.
156(2) An employer must ensure that a worker on a scissor lift or on an elevating work platform with similar characteristics uses a travel restraint system consisting of a full body harness and lanyard
(a) connected to an anchor specified by the manufacturer of the scissor lift or elevating work platform, and
(b) when connected to the anchor, the lanyard, if reasonably practicable, is short enough to prevent the worker from falling out of the scissor lift or elevating work platform but is long enough to allow the worker to perform his or her work.
156(3) Subsection (2) does not apply if
(a) the manufacturer’s specifications allow a worker to work from the scissor lift or elevating work platform with similar characteristics using only its guardrails for fall protection, and
(b) the scissor lift or elevating work platform is operating on a firm, substantially level surface.
156(4) Despite subsection (2), if a worker’s movement cannot be adequately restricted in all directions by the travel restraint system, the employer must ensure that the worker uses a personal fall arrest system.

Water danger
157 An employer must ensure that a worker uses an appropriate fall protection system in combination with a life jacket or personal flotation device if the worker
(a) may fall into water that exposes the worker to the hazard of drowning, or
(b) could drown from falling into the water, from other than a boat.

Leading edge fall protection system
158 An employer using a leading edge fall protection system consisting of fabric or netting panels must ensure that
(a) the system is used only to provide leading edge fall protection,
(b) the system is used and installed according to the manufacturer’s specifications,

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(c) a copy of the manufacturer’s specifications for the system is available to workers at the work site at which the system is being used,
(d) the fabric or netting is
(i) drop tested at the work site in accordance with the requirements of 29 CFR Section 1926.502(C)4(i) published by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or
(ii) certified as safe for use by a professional engineer, and
(e) all workers using the system are trained in its use and limitations.

Procedures in place of fall protection equipment
159(1) An employer may develop and use procedures in place of fall protection equipment in accordance with subsection (2), if
(a) it is not reasonably practicable to use one of the fall protection systems described in this Part, and
(b) use of procedures in place of fall protection equipment is restricted to the following situations:
(i) the installation or removal of fall protection equipment;
(ii) roof inspection;
(iii) emergency repairs;
(iv) at height transfers between equipment and structures if allowed by the manufacturer’s specifications; and
(v) situations in which a worker must work on top of a vehicle or load and the requirements of section 155 have been met.
159(2) An employer using procedures in place of fall protection equipment must ensure that
(a) a hazard assessment in accordance with the requirements of Part 2 is completed before work at height begins,
(b) the procedures to be followed while performing the work must be in writing and available to workers before the work begins,
(c) the work is carried out in such a way that minimizes the number of workers exposed to a fall hazard while work is performed,
(d) the work is limited to light duty tasks of limited duration,
(e) the worker performing the work is competent to do it,
(f) when used for inspection, investigation or assessment activities, these activities take place prior to the actual start of work or after work has been completed, and
(g) the procedures do not expose a worker to additional hazards.

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Work positioning
160(1) An employer must ensure that if a worker uses a work positioning system, the worker’s vertical free fall distance in the event of a fall is restricted by the work positioning system to 600 millimetres or less.
160(2) If the centre of gravity of a worker using a work positioning system extends beyond an edge from which the worker could fall or if the work surface presents a slipping or tripping hazard because of its state or condition, an employer must ensure that the worker uses a back‐up personal fall arrest system in combination with the work positioning system.
160(3) A worker must use a back‐up personal fall arrest system in combination with the work positioning system if the worker’s centre of gravity extends beyond an edge from which the worker could fall or if the work surface presents a slipping or tripping hazard because of its state or condition.

Control zones
161(1) If a control zone is used, an employer must ensure that it
(a) is only used if a worker can fall from a surface that has a slope of no more than 4 degrees toward an unguarded edge or that slopes inwardly away from an unguarded edge, and
(b) is not less than 2 metres wide when measured from the unguarded edge.
161(2) An employer must not use a control zone to protect workers from falling from a skeletal structure that is a work area.
161(3) If a worker will at all times remain further from the unguarded edge than the width of the control zone, no other fall protection system need be used.
161(4) Despite section 139, a worker is not required to use a fall protection system when crossing the control zone to enter or leave the work area.
161(5) When crossing a control zone referred to in subsections (3) and (4), to get to or from the unguarded edge, a worker must follow the most direct route.
161(6) An employer must ensure that a control zone is clearly marked with an effective raised warning line or another equally effective method if a worker is working within 2 metres of the control zone.

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161(7) An employer must ensure that a worker who must work within a control zone uses
(a) a travel restraint system, or
(b) an equally effective means of preventing the worker from getting to the unguarded edge.
161(8) A person who is not directly required for the work at hand must not be inside a control zone.

Fall Protection – Protection contre les chutes

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.
The following is © 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 Copyright Workers’ Compensation Board of British Columbia Richmond, B.C., Canada. All rights reserved.

Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Regulation

11.2 Obligation to use fall protection
(1) Unless elsewhere provided for in this Regulation, an employer must ensure that a fall protection system is used when work is being done at a place
(a) from which a fall of 3 m (10 ft) or more may occur, or
(b) where a fall from a height of less than 3 m involves a risk of injury greater than the risk of injury from the impact on a flat surface.
(2) The employer must ensure that guardrails meeting the requirements of Part 4 (General Conditions) or other similar means of fall restraint are used when practicable.
(3) If subsection (2) is not practicable, the employer must ensure that another fall restraint system is used.
(4) If subsection (3) is not practicable, the employer must ensure that a fall arrest system is used.
(5) If the use of a fall arrest system is not practicable, or will result in a hazard greater than if the system was not used, the employer must ensure that work procedures are followed that are acceptable to the Board and minimize the risk of injury to a worker from a fall.
(6) Before a worker is allowed into an area where a risk of falling exists, the employer must ensure that the worker is instructed in the fall protection system for the area and the procedures to be followed.
(7) A worker must use the fall protection system provided by the employer.
[Amended by B.C. Reg. 420/2004, effective January 1, 2005.]

11.3 Fall protection plan
(1) The employer must have a written fall protection plan for a workplace if
(a) work is being done at a location where workers are not protected by permanent guardrails, and from which a fall of 7.5 m (25 ft) or more may occur, or
(b) section 11.2(5) applies.
(c) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 420/2004, effective January 1, 2005.] (2) The fall protection plan must be available at the workplace before work with a risk of falling begins.
(3) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 420/2004, effective January 1, 2005.] [Amended by B.C. Reg. 420/2004, effective January 1, 2005.]

11.4 Selection of harness or belt
(1) A worker must wear a full body harness or other harness acceptable to the Board when using a personal fall protection system for fall arrest.
(2) A worker must wear a safety belt, a full body harness or other harness acceptable to the Board when using a personal fall protection system for fall restraint.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 420/2004, effective January 1, 2005.]

11.5 Equipment standards
Equipment used for a fall protection system must
(a) consist of compatible and suitable components,
(b) be sufficient to support the fall restraint or arrest forces, and
(c) meet, and be used in accordance with, an applicable CSA or ANSI standard in effect when the equipment was manufactured, subject to any modification or upgrading considered necessary by the Board.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 420/2004, effective January 1, 2005.]

11.6 Anchors
(1) In a temporary fall restraint system, an anchor for a personal fall protection system must have an ultimate load capacity in any direction in which a load may be applied of at least
(a) 3.5 kN (800 lbs), or
(b) four times the weight of the worker to be connected to the system.
(2) Each personal fall protection system that is connected to an anchor must be secured to an independent point of anchorage.
(3) In a temporary fall arrest system, an anchor for a personal fall protection system must have an ultimate load capacity in any direction required to resist a fall of at least
(a) 22 kN (5 000 lbs), or
(b) two times the maximum arrest force.
(4) A permanent anchor for a personal fall protection system must have an ultimate load capacity in any direction required to resist a fall of at least 22 kN (5 000 lbs).
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 420/2004, effective January 1, 2005.] [Amended by B.C. Reg. 19/2006, effective May 17, 2006.]

11.7 Temporary horizontal lifelines
A temporary horizontal lifeline system may be used if the system is
(a) manufactured for commercial distribution and installed and used in accordance with the written instructions from the manufacturer or authorized agent, and the instructions are readily available in the workplace,
(b) installed and used in accordance with written instructions certified by a professional engineer, and the instructions are readily available in the workplace, or
(c) designed, installed and used in a manner acceptable to the Board.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 420/2004, effective January 1, 2005.] [Amended by B.C. Reg. 19/2006, effective May 17, 2006.]

11.8 Certification by engineer
The following types of equipment and systems, and their installation, must be certified by a professional engineer:
(a) permanent anchors,
(b) anchors with multiple attachment points,
(c) permanent horizontal lifeline systems, and
(d) support structures for safety nets.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 420/2004, effective January 1, 2005.]

11.9 Inspection and maintenance
Equipment used in a fall protection system must be
(a) inspected by a qualified person before use on each workshift,
(b) kept free from substances and conditions that could contribute to its deterioration, and
(c) maintained in good working order.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 420/2004, effective January 1, 2005.]

11.10 Removal from service
(1) After a fall protection system has arrested the fall of a worker, it must
(a) be removed from service, and
(b) not be returned to service until it has been inspected and recertified as safe for use by the manufacturer or its authorized agent, or by a professional engineer.
(2) Subject to subsection (3), subsection (1) (b) does not apply to a personal fall protection system designed and intended for reuse by a performer in the entertainment industry for conducting a planned fall sequence.
(3) The following conditions must be met before a personal fall protection system described in subsection (2) will be exempt from subsection (1) (b):
(a) the system must be designed and used in accordance with a standard acceptable to the Board;
(b) each use of the system must be carried out in accordance with the plan for the conduct of the fall;
(c) the peak arrest forces generated in the system during each use must be at or below both the planned limits and the maximum forces allowed for the system;
(d) after each use of the system no part of the system, including the anchorage, may be reused until a qualified person has inspected it and determined it is in serviceable condition and safe for reuse.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.
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PART 1
DEFINITIONS AND GENERAL MATTERS
Definitions
1.1 The following definitions apply in this regulation.

“fall arrest system” means a fall protection system that is designed to stop a worker’s fall before the worker hits the surface below.

“fall protection system” means a fall protection system set out in section 14.6.

“full body harness” means a device consisting of connected straps designed to contain the torso and pelvic area of a worker with provision for attaching a lanyard, lifeline or other component

“lanyard” means a flexible line of webbing, synthetic fibre or wire rope that is used to secure a full body harness to a lifeline or anchor.

“travel restraint system” means a fall protection system that is designed to prevent a worker from travelling to a location where there is a risk of falling.

PART 14
FALL PROTECTION
Application
14.1(1) This Part applies to every workplace where there is a risk of a worker falling
(a) a vertical distance of 3 m or more;
(b) a vertical distance of less than 3 m where there is an increased risk of injury due to the surface or item on which the worker might land;
(c) into operating machinery or moving parts of the machinery;
(d) into water or another liquid;
(e) into or onto a hazardous substance or object;
(f) through an opening on a work surface; or
(g) a vertical distance of more than 1.2 m from an area used as a path for a wheelbarrow or similar equipment.
14.1(2) This Part does not apply to a workplace that is subject to Division 2 of Part 31

ROOF WORK

Safe work procedures
14.2(1) An employer must
(a) develop and implement safe work procedures to prevent falls at the workplace;
(b) train workers in the safe work procedures; and
(c) ensure that workers comply with the safe work procedures.

14.2(2) The safe work procedures must identify the fall hazards at the workplace and set out the measures that will be used to prevent falls at the workplace.

14.2(3) When this Part requires the use of a guardrail system or fall protection system at a workplace, the safe work procedures must address the following issues:
(a) the location of each guardrail system or fall protection system to be used at the workplace;
(b) the procedures used to assemble, maintain, inspect, use and disassemble a fall protection system;
(c) where applicable, the rescue procedures to be used for rescuing a worker after a fall has been arrested.

GUARDRAIL SYSTEMS

Guardrail system requirements
14.3 Subject to section 14.6, an employer must ensure that a guardrail system is used where there is a risk of a worker falling in any of the circumstances set out in subsection 14.1(1).

Guardrail requirements
14.4(1) An employer must ensure that a guardrail
(a) is at least 900 mm high and not more than 1,060 mm above the working surface, with an intermediate rail at between 450 and 530 mm above the working surface; and
(b) is constructed and secured to resist a static load of 900 N in any direction in which the load may be applied at any point on the top rail and on any intermediate rail.
14.4(2) A guardrail must have a toe board securely fastened to the posts and extending from the surface of the working area to a height of at least 125 mm when there is a risk of falling objects.

14.4(3) If a guardrail is made from wood, it must
(a) be free from splinters and protruding nails; and
(b) have a top and mid rail of at least 38 mm H 89 mm securely supported on posts of at least 38 mm H 89 mm and spaced at not more than 2.4 m.

Temporary guardrail removal
14.5 An employer may temporarily remove a guardrail when it is necessary to do so to facilitate work in the immediate area. The employer must ensure that any worker in the area uses a fall protection system while the guardrail is removed.

FALL PROTECTION SYSTEMS

Fall protection systems
14.6 When the use of a guardrail system is not reasonably practicable or would not be effective, an employer must ensure that the worker is protected by at least one of the following fall protection systems:
(a) a travel restraint system;
(b) a fall arrest system;
(c) a safety net;
(d) another fall protection system approved by the director.

Requirements for fall protection systems
14.7(1) An employer must ensure that a fall protection system
(a) is designed, installed, tested, used and maintained in accordance with the applicable requirements of the following standards:
(i) CSA Standard Z259.1-05, Body Belts and Saddles for Work Positioning and Travel Restraint,
(ii) CAN/CSA Standard Z259.2.1-98 (R2004), Fall Arresters, Vertical Lifelines, and Rails,
(iii) CAN/CSA Standard Z259.2.2-98 (R2004), Self-Retracting Devices for Personal Fall-Arrest Systems,
(iv) CSA Standard Z259.2.3-99 (R2004), Descent Control Devices,
(v) CSA Standard Z259.10-06, Full Body Harnesses,
(vi) CSA Standard Z259.11-05, Energy Absorbers and Lanyards,
(vii) CAN/CSA Standard Z259.12-01 (R2006), Connecting Components for Personal Fall Arrest Systems (PFAS),
(viii) CSA Standard Z259.16-04, Design of Active Fall-Protection Systems,
(ix) CSA Standard Z259.13-04, Flexible Horizontal Lifeline Systems,
(x) ANSI Standard 10.11-1989 (R1998), Personnel & Debris Nets for Construction & Demolition Operations – Safety Requirements for Personnel and Debris Nets – American National Standard for Construction and Demolition Operations;
(b) designed and certified as safe by a professional engineer and installed, tested, used and maintained in accordance with the specifications certified by the
professional engineer.
14.7(2) Despite the reference to safety belts in CSA Standard Z259.1-05, Body Belts and Saddles for Work Positioning and Travel Restraint, an employer must ensure that a safety belt is not used as part of a fall protection system at the workplace.

Inspection and maintenance
14.8(1) An employer must ensure that the equipment used as part of a fall protection system is
(a) inspected before use on each work shift by
(i) subject to subsection (2), the worker who uses the fall protection system, or
(ii) a competent person other than the worker using the system;
(b) kept free from any substance or condition that could contribute to deterioration of the equipment; and
(c) maintained in good working order and in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications.
14.8(2) When a safety net is used, the net must be inspected by a competent person before each work shift.

Inspection after fall arrest
14.9 After a fall protection system has arrested the fall of a worker, an employer must ensure that the system is not returned to service until it has been inspected and certified as safe by the manufacturer or a professional engineer.

Defective components
14.10 When a component of a fall protection system is defective in condition or function, an employer must not use the component and must immediately remove it from service and either return it to the manufacturer to be repaired or replaced or destroy it.

Training
14.11 An employer must ensure that a worker using a fall protection system is trained in its use, care and inspection by a competent person.

Travel restraint systems
14.12 When a travel restraint system is used, an employer must ensure that
(a) the travel restraint system consists of a full body harness with adequate attachment points;
(b) the full body harness is attached by a lifeline or lanyard to a fixed support that meets the requirements of section 14.14 (fixed support system requirements); and
(c) the length of the lifeline or the lanyard is selected so that the worker can only proceed to within one metre of an opening or edge.

Fall arrest systems
14.13(1) When a fall arrest system is used, an employer must ensure that the system
(a) consists of a full body harness with adequate attachment points;
(b) is attached by a lifeline or lanyard to an independent fixed support that meets the requirements of subsection 14.14(1);
(c) is designed in accordance with CSA Standard Z259.16-04, Design of Active Fall-Protection Systems and CSA Standard Z259.13-04, Flexible Horizontal Lifeline Systems;
(d) is manufactured so that a worker’s free fall distance does not exceed 1.2 m excluding the increase in the total fall distance resulting from the use of shock absorbers; and
(e) is arranged so that a worker cannot
(i) hit the ground or an object or level below the work, or
(ii) swing in a manner that poses a risk to the safety or health of a worker.
14.13(2) When a lanyard referred to in clause (1)(b) is equipped with a shock absorber or other similar device, the shock absorber or device must comply with CSA Standard Z259.11-05, Energy Absorbers and Lanyards.
14.13(3) An employer must ensure that a fall arrest system does not include a shock absorber if wearing or using one could cause a worker to hit the ground or an object or level below the work.
14.13(4) An employer must ensure that the fall arrest system does not subject a worker who falls to a peak dynamic fall arrest force greater than 8 kN.

Fixed support system requirements
14.14(1) The owner of a building or structure must ensure that a permanent anchorage system used as the fixed support in a travel restraint system or fall arrest system for that building meets the following requirements:
(a) the anchor has an ultimate capacity of at least 22.2 kN in any direction in which the load may be applied for each worker attached;
(b) the anchorage system is certified by a professional engineer as having the required load capacity;
(c) where the anchorage system is used in conjunction with a suspended work platform, the system is designed, constructed and used in accordance with CAN/CSA Standard-Z91-02, Health and Safety Code for Suspended Equipment Operations and CAN/CSA-Z271-98 (R2004), Safety Code for Suspended Elevating Platforms.
14.14(2) When a permanent anchorage system cannot be used at a workplace, an employer must ensure that the temporary fixed support in a travel restraint system or fall arrest system meets the following requirements:
(a) when a fall arrest system without a shock absorber is used, a support used in a fall arrest system must be capable of supporting a static force of at least 8 kN without exceeding the allowable unit stress for each material used in the fabrication of the anchor point;
(b) when a shock absorber is used in a fall arrest system, the support must be capable of supporting a static force of at least 6 kN without exceeding the allowable unit stress for each material used in the fabrication of the anchor point;
(c) a support used in a travel restraint system must be capable of supporting a static force of at least 2 kN without exceeding the allowable unit stress for each material used in the fabrication of the anchor point.

No sharp edges
14.15 An employer must ensure that no component of a travel restraint system or a fall arrest system comes into contact with a sharp edge that could cut, chafe or abrade any component of the system.

Fall arrest systems and powered mobile equipment
14.16 When a fall arrest system is used on powered mobile equipment, an employer must ensure that the system is attached to an anchor in accordance with the specifications of the manufacturer of the powered mobile equipment.

Fall protection on vehicles
14.17 When a worker may have to climb on a vehicle or its load at any location other than a garage, warehouse or other permanent facility and it is not reasonably practicable to provide a fall protection system for the worker, an employer must
(a) take steps to eliminate or reduce the need for a worker to climb onto the vehicle or its load; and
(b) provide information, instruction and training to a worker on safe work procedures for climbing or working on the vehicle or its load.

Full body harness
14.18 When a worker uses a full body harness, an employer must ensure that
(a) the full-body harness and connecting linkage are used, maintained, adjusted and stored in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications; and
(b) the full-body harness is properly fitted to the worker.

Lanyards
14.19 When a worker uses a lanyard, an employer must ensure that the lanyard is
(a) as short as work conditions permit;
(b) equipped with suitable snap hooks;
(c) free of imperfections, knots and splices, other than end terminations;
(d) protected by padding where it passes over sharp edges;
(e) protected from heat, flame, abrasive or corrosive materials during use;
(f) used, maintained, adjusted and stored in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications; and
(g) used by only one worker at a time.

Lifeline requirements
14.20 When a worker uses a lifeline, an employer must ensure that the lifeline is
(a) suitable for the conditions in which the lifeline is to be used, having regard to factors including strength, abrasion resistance, extensibility and chemical stability;
(b) free of imperfections, knots and splices, other than end terminations;
(c) protected by padding where the lifeline passes over sharp edges;
(d) protected from heat, flame, abrasive or corrosive materials during use;
(e) fastened to a secure anchor point or anchor points as required under this Part; and
(f) installed, used and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer.

Vertical lifelines
14.21 When a worker uses a vertical lifeline, an employer must ensure that
(a) the lower end of the vertical lifeline extends to the ground or to a safe landing; and
(b) the vertical lifeline is protected at the lower end to ensure that the line cannot be fouled by equipment.

Horizontal lifelines
14.22(1) When a worker uses a horizontal lifeline system, an employer must ensure that the specifications for the system are kept at the worksite and are readily accessible by a worker.
14.22(2) The specifications for a horizontal lifeline system must address the following issues:
(a) the arrangement of the system, including the anchorage or fixed support system;
(b) the components used;
(c) the number of workers that can safely be attached to it;
(d) the instructions for installation or erection;
(e) the maximum load capacity of the system.
14.22(3) When a permanent horizontal lifeline system from a manufacturer is installed at a workplace, an employer must ensure that, before the system is put into use, the system is certified as being properly installed according to the manufacturer’s specifications by one of the following:
(a) the manufacturer;
(b) a person authorized by the manufacturer;
(c) a professional engineer.
14.22(4) When a permanent horizontal lifeline system designed by a professional engineer is installed at a workplace, the employer must ensure that, before the system is put into use, the system is certified as being properly installed according to the engineer’s specifications by a professional engineer.

Inspection and testing of safety nets
14.23(1) When a safety net is used, an employer must ensure that a professional engineer or a competent person under a professional engineer’s supervision inspects and tests the installation of the safety net before it is put in service.

14.23(2) An employer must ensure that the safety net
(a) is installed not more than 7.70 m below the work area; and
(b) extends at least 2.5 m on all sides beyond the work area.

RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION

Erection of second floor exterior wall
14.24(1) When a worker is required to erect a second floor exterior wall on a residential construction project in circumstances where it is not reasonably practicable to provide a fall protection system for the worker, an employer must ensure that an alternate safe work procedure is implemented to protect the safety and health of the worker.
14.24(2) A safe work procedure implemented under subsection (1) must offer protection to the worker that is equal or greater to the protection provided by a fall protection system that meets the requirements of this Part.

Installation of wood trusses
14.25(1) When a worker is required to install wood trusses on a residential construction project in circumstances where it is not reasonably practicable to provide a
fall protection system for the worker before the installation of roof sheeting, an employer must ensure that an alternate safe work procedure is implemented to protect the safety and health of the worker.
14.25(2) A safe work procedure implemented under subsection (1) must
(a) ensure that no work is performed by a worker while standing on the top plate of the exterior walls of the structure; and
(b) offer protection to the worker that is equal or greater to the protection provided by a fall protection system that meets the requirements of this Part.

Training and compliance
14.26 When an employer implements an alternate safe work procedure under section 14.24 or 14.25, the employer must
(a) provide information, instruction and training on the safe work procedures to workers; and
(b) ensure that workers comply with the safe work procedures.

BUILDING REQUIREMENTS

Required roof protection
14.27(1) The owner of a building that is more than five storeys tall or 15 m in height that is constructed after the coming into force of this regulation must either
(a) provide a permanent perimeter guardrail system that meets the requirements of this Part; or
(b) provide roof-level protection consisting of
(i) a continuous parapet or fencing not less than 900 mm in height, or
(ii) a system of lifeline anchors with one anchor set back a minimum of 3 m from the edge of the roof for every six linear metres of unprotected roof edge.
14.27(2) When roof-level protection on a building consists of a system of lifeline anchors, the owner of the building must ensure that
(a) each lifeline anchor is
(i) capable of resisting a force of 22.2 kN in any direction in which the load may be applied for each worker attached, and
(ii) made of stainless steel or other material resistant to corrosion;
(b) the anchorage system is certified by a professional engineer as having the required load capacity; and
(c) where an eyebolt is used as an anchor, that the interior opening of the eye measures at least 38 mm.

Steel frame building requirements
14.28 During the construction of a steel frame building, the owner of the building and the prime contractor responsible for the construction of the building must ensure that the structural components of the building designed to accommodate a fall protection system
(a) are designed, approved and certified as safe by a professional engineer; and
(b) include
(i) double connections at each column and at beam webs over a column,
(ii) at least four anchor bolts per column, and
(iii) perimeter columns that extend at least one metre above the finished floor to permit the installation of perimeter safety cables.

Definition: “anchor”
14.29 In this Part, “anchor” means a secure point of attachment for a lifeline or lanyard.

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Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, 2009 under the
Occupational Health and Safety Act (O.C. 2009-233)

PART X
FALL PROTECTION

Definitions
138. In this Part
(a) “anchorage point” means a secure point of attachment for a lifeline or lanyard;
(b) “arborist” means a worker trained and employed, in whole or in part, to climb trees for an economic or scientific purpose, including
(i) detection and treatment of disease, infections or infestations,
(ii) pruning, spraying or trimming,
(iii) repairing damaged trees,
(iv) assessing growth or harvesting potential, or
(v) scientific research;
(c) “body belt” means a belt worn by a worker as a means of fall restraint;
(d) “debris net” means a net that is used to catch material and debris that can drop from work areas;
(e) “fall arrest system” means a system of physical components attached to a worker that stops a worker during a fall;
(f) “full body harness” means a harness consisting of leg and shoulder straps and an upper back suspension unit that distributes and reduces the impact force of a fall;
(g) “guardrail” means a system of vertical and horizontal members that warns of a fall hazard and reduces the risk of a fall;
(h) “lanyard” means a flexible line used to secure a worker to a lifeline, a static line or a fixed anchor point;
(i) “lifeline” means a vertical line attached to a fixed anchor point or a static line and to which a lanyard and a rope grab may be attached;
(j) “means of fall protection” means a fall protection system and includes a harness, net, rope, body belt, structure or other equipment or device or means of
(i) restraining a worker who is at risk of falling, or
(ii) stopping a worker who has fallen;
(k) “personnel safety net” means a net that is used to catch a worker during a fall;
(l) “ropegrab” means a mechanical fall-arrest device that
(i) is attached to a lifeline and a lanyard, and
(ii) locks itself immediately on the lifeline in the event of a fall;
(m) “safe surface” means a surface at a workplace that
(i) has sufficient size and strength to adequately support a worker who falls on to the surface, and
(ii) is sufficiently horizontal to prevent a further fall from the surface by a worker who has fallen on to the surface;
(n) “softener” means padding or hoses that are used with a lifeline or static line to prevent a rope from being cut or chafed; and
(o) “static line” or “horizontal life line” means a rope
(i) that is attached horizontally to 2 or more fixed anchor points, and
(ii) to which a fall arrest system is attached.

Training requirement
139. A worker shall not use fall protection equipment after January 1, 2012 unless he or she has completed a training program on fall protection prescribed by the commission.

Fall protection systems
140. Where an employer determines it is impractical to provide adequate work platforms or staging, the employer shall ensure that fall protection systems are used by all workers who are exposed to the hazard of falling, as required in section 141.

General requirements
141. Where a worker is exposed to the hazard of falling from a work area that is
(a) 3 metres or more above the nearest safe surface or water;
(b) above a surface or thing that could cause injury to the worker if the worker were to fall on the surface or thing; or
(c) above an open tank, pit or vat containing hazardous material, the employer shall ensure that
(d) the worker is provided with a fall arrest system that meets the requirements of section 142;
(e) a guardrail that meets the requirements of section 28 is constructed or installed at the work area;
(f) a personnel safety net that meets the requirements of section 143 is installed at the work area;
(g) temporary flooring that meets the requirements of section 146 is constructed or installed at the work area; or
(h) the worker is provided with another means of fall protection that provides a level of safety equal to or greater than a fall arrest system that meets the requirements of section 142.

Fall arrest system
142. (1) A fall arrest system that is provided in accordance with section 141 shall
(a) be adequately secured to
(i) an anchorage point, or
(ii) a lifeline that is
(A) securely fastened to anchor points, or
(B) attached to a static line that is securely fastened to anchorage points and that is capable of withstanding either the maximum load likely to be imposed on the anchorage point or a load of 22.2 kilonewtons, whichever is the greater;
(b) include a lanyard
(i) that is attached to an anchorage point or lifeline, where practicable, above the shoulder of the worker, and
(ii) that complies with CSA Standard Z259.11 “Energy Absorbers and Lanyards”;
(c) prevent a free fall greater than 1.22 metres where
(i) the fall arrest system is not equipped with a shock absorption system that complies with CSA Standard Z259.11 “Energy Absorbers and Lanyards” and that reduces the shock level of a fall to less than 4 kilonewtons, or
(ii) the combined free fall and shock absorbed deceleration distance exceeds the distance between the work area and a safe surface; and
(d) include a full body harness that
(i) is attached to a lanyard,
(ii) is adjusted to fit the user of the harness, and
(iii) complies with CSA Standard Z259.10 “Full Body Harnesses”.
(2) Where a fall arrest system includes a lifeline, the lifeline shall
(a) comply with CSA Standard Z259.2.1 “Fall Arresters, Vertical Lifelines and Rails”;
(b) extend to a safe surface below the work area and be securely attached to an anchorage point;
(c) be secured at the bottom of the lifeline to prevent tangling or disturbance of the line and be free of knots, lubricants and imperfections;
(d) be free of splices, except where they are necessary to connect the lifeline to an anchorage point;
(e) be provided with softeners at all sharp edges or corners to protect against cuts or chafing; and
(f) be clearly identified as a lifeline by colour or by another means that provides an equivalent level of safety.
(3) No worker shall
(a) use a lifeline in a fall arrest system while that fall arrest system is being used by another worker; or
(b) provide a rope for use, or permit a rope to be used, as a lifeline in a fall arrest system where the rope has been used for another purpose.
(4) Where a fall arrest system provided to a worker includes a ropegrab, the ropegrab used shall comply with CSA Standard Z259.2.1 “Fall Arresters, Vertical Lifelines and Rails”.
(5) An employer who provides a worker with a fall arrest system shall ensure the fall arrest system is inspected by a qualified person before each work shift undertaken by the worker.
(6) A qualified person who carries out an inspection of a fall arrest system shall advise the employer where a component of the system is defective in condition or function and the employer shall ensure that the system is not used until the defective component is replaced or repaired.
(7) Where a fall arrest system has arrested the fall of a worker at a work area, the employer shall ensure that the fall arrest system
(a) is removed from service and inspected by a qualified person; and
(b) is repaired, before it is reused, to the original manufacturer’s specifications, where an inspection under paragraph (a) reveals that a component of the system is defective.
(8) Where a fall arrest system includes a static line, the static line shall
(a) have a nominal diameter of at least 12.7 millimetres and be made of improved plow wire rope;
(b) be equipped with vertical supports at least every 9 metres and have a maximum deflection, when taut, of no greater than 381 millimetres for a 9 metre span;
(c) be equipped with turnbuckles or other comparable tightening devices that provide an equivalent level of protection, at the ends of the static line;
(d) be equipped with softeners at all sharp edges or corners to protect against cuts or chafing;
(e) be made only of components that are able to withstand either the maximum load likely to be imposed on the components or a load of 8 kilonewtons, whichever is the greater; and
(f) comply with CSA Standard Z259.13 “Flexible Horizontal Lifeline Systems” and CSA Standard Z259.16 “Design of Active Fall Protection Systems”.
(9) Where a fall arrest system is provided to an arborist, the fall arrest system shall
(a) include a tree climbing or tree trimming harness or saddle;
(b) be adequately secured to
(i) an anchorage point, or
(ii) a lifeline that is
(A) securely fastened to anchorage points, or
(B) attached to a static line that is securely fastened to anchorage points;
(c) include a climbing rope or safety strap;
(d) where practicable, include a second climbing rope or safety strap that
(i) provides additional stability, and
(ii) back-up fall protection; and
(e) be capable of withstanding either the maximum load likely to be imposed or a load of 22.2 kilonewtons, whichever is the greater.
(10) Where an employer uses a fall arrest system or a personnel safety net as a means of fall protection, the employer shall have a written fall protection plan that specifies
(a) the procedure to assemble, maintain, inspect, use and disassemble the fall arrest system or personnel safety net; and
(b) the procedure for the rescue of a worker who has fallen and is suspended by the fall arrest system or personnel safety net, but is unable to effect self-rescue.

Nets
143. (1) Where a personnel safety net is installed in accordance with section 141, an employer shall ensure that it
(a) is installed
(i) not more than 4.6 metres below the work area,
(ii) to ensure that no obstructions or intervening members may be struck by a worker during a fall between the work area and the personnel safety net, and
(iii) maintained so that the maximum deflection when arresting the fall of a worker does not allow a part of the worker to contact another surface;
(b) extends 2.4 metres on all sides beyond the work area; and
(c) where connected to another personnel safety net, the splice joints connecting it with the other personnel safety nets are equal to, or greater in strength than, the strength of the weakest of the personnel safety nets.
(2) Notwithstanding subsection (1), an employer shall ensure that a personnel safety net is manufactured, used, maintained, inspected and stored in accordance with ANSI Standard A10.11-1989 “Safety Nets Used During Construction, Repair and Demolition Operations”.

Debris nets
144. (1) Where a worker having access to an area below an elevated work area is exposed to the hazard of falling objects or debris from the work area, an employer shall ensure that
(a) a debris net is installed below the work area in accordance with subsection (2); or
(b) other means of protection are provided that provide an equivalent level of protection from falling objects and debris.
(2) An employer shall ensure that a debris net under subsection (1) is
(a) manufactured, used, maintained, inspected and stored in accordance with ANSI Standard A10.11-1989 “Safety Nets Used during Construction, Repair and Demolition Operations”; and
(b) installed not more than 4.6 metres below the elevated work area.

Travel restraint
145. An employer shall ensure that a body belt provided in accordance with section 141 complies with CSA Standard Z259 “Body Belts and Saddles for Work Positioning and Travel Restraint”.

Temporary flooring
146. Temporary flooring that is constructed or installed in accordance with section 141 shall
(a) be constructed or installed at each floor level of the work area where work is in progress;
(b) extend over the whole work area except for openings necessary for the carrying out of work;
(c) be able to withstand 4 times the maximum load likely to be imposed on it; and
(d) be securely fastened to and supported on members that are able to withstand 4 times the maximum load likely to be imposed on them.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following is copyright © 2009, Province of Nova Scotia

Occupational Health and Safety Act
S.N.S. 1996, c. 7

Part I: General
Citation and application
1 These regulations may be cited as the Fall Protection and Scaffolding Regulations.
2 These regulations apply to all workplaces to which the Occupational Health and Safety Act applies.

Interpretation
3 (a) “Act” means the Occupational Health and Safety Act;
(b) “ANSI” means the American National Standards Institute;
(c) “anchor point” means a component that is attached to a structure and to which fall protection or scaffold components are secured;
(d) “anti-two blocking device” means a device that warns a person operating a hoisting device that continued movement of the load may cause the load to strike or come into contact with the upper sheaves of the hoisting device;
(e) “approved” means approved by the Nova Scotia Department of Environment and Labour or by an approval agency or authority approved by the Nova Scotia Department of Environment and Labour;
(f) “arborist” means a person trained and employed, in whole or in part, to climb trees for any economic or scientific purpose, including
(i) detection and treatment of disease, infections or infestations,
(ii) pruning, spraying or trimming,
(iii) repairing damaged trees,
(iv) assessing growth or harvesting potential, or
(v) scientific research;
(g) “boatswain’s chair” means a seat attached to a suspended rope, designed to accommodate one person in a sitting position;
(h) “bracket scaffold” means a scaffold consisting of a work platform supported by brackets attached to a structural wall;
(i) “CGSB” means the Canadian General Standards Board;
(j) “CSA” means the Canadian Standards Association;
(k) “cantilevered scaffold” means a scaffold with a work platform that is directly attached to components that extend out from a building or a structure;
(l) “competent person” means a person who is
(i) qualified because of that person’s knowledge, training and experience to do the assigned work in a manner that will ensure the health and safety of persons in the workplace, and
(ii) knowledgeable about the provisions of the Act and the regulations, that apply to the assigned work, and about potential or actual danger to health or safety associated with the assigned work;
(m) “crane supported work platform” means a work platform suspended from the cable of a hoist or crane;
(n) “debris net” means a net that is used to catch material and debris which can drop from work areas;
(o) “fall arrest system” means a system of physical components attached to a person that stops a person during a fall;
(p) “fall protection” means a harness, net, rope, safety belt, structure or other equipment, or device or means of
(i) restraining a person who is at risk of falling, or
(ii) stopping a person who has fallen;
(q) “fork-lift platform” means a work platform supported by an industrial lift truck;
(r) “full body harness” means a harness consisting of leg and shoulder straps and an upper back suspension unit that will distribute and reduce the impact force of any fall;
(s) “guardrail” means a temporary system of vertical and horizontal members that warn of a fall hazard and reduce the risk of a fall;
(t) “heavy duty scaffold” means a scaffold designed to support a uniformly distributed load of 366 kg/m2 or more;
(u) “ladderjack scaffold” means a scaffold erected by means of attaching one or more brackets to one or more ladders to support a work platform;
(v) “lanyard” means a flexible line used to secure a person to a lifeline, a static line or a fixed anchor point;
(w) “lifeline” means a vertical line attached to a fixed anchor point or a static line and to which a lanyard and a ropegrab are attached;
(x) “light duty scaffold” means a scaffold designed to support a uniformly distributed load of not more than 366 kg/m2;
(y) “permanent powered suspension work platform” means a powered work platform that is suspended from a suspension mechanism which is a permanent part of a building or structure;
(z) “personnel safety net” means a net that is used to catch a person during a fall;
(aa) “power operated elevating work platform” means a work platform elevated and lowered by means of a mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic or other powered mechanism;
(ab) “practicable” means physically possible in light of current knowledge and invention;
(ac) “professional engineer” means a person who is a professional engineer within the meaning of the Engineering Professions Act and is competent to do the work being performed;
(ad) “pumpjack scaffold” means a scaffold consisting of a work platform supported by vertical poles and adjustable support brackets;
(ae) “reasonably practicable” means practicable unless the person on whom a duty is placed can show that there is a gross disproportion between the benefit of the duty and the cost, in time, trouble and money, of the measures to secure the duty;
(af) “rolling scaffold” means an assembled scaffold
(i) supported by wheels, and
(ii) moved manually;
(ag) “roofing bracket” means a bracket
(i) that is secured to a sloped roof, and
(ii) to which a work platform is secured;
(ah) “ropegrab” means a mechanical fall-arrest device that
(i) is attached to a lifeline and a lanyard, and
(ii) locks itself immediately on the lifeline in the event of a fall;
(ai) “safe means of access and egress” means equipment or a structure that is built to prevent falls by persons going to or from a work area;
(aj) “safe surface” means an area which
(i) has sufficient size and strength to adequately support a person who falls, and
(ii) is sufficiently horizontal to prevent a further fall by a person who has fallen;
(ak) “safety belt” means a belt worn by a person as a means of fall protection;
(al) “scaffold” means
(i) an elevated work platform, or
(ii) a suspended work platform and the supporting components of the work platform;
(am) “softener” means padding or hoses that are used with a lifeline, suspended scaffold or static line to prevent a rope from being cut or chafed;
(an) “static line” means a rope
(i) that is attached horizontally to two or more fixed anchor points, and
(ii) to which a fall arrest system is attached;
(ao) “suspended scaffold” means a scaffold with a work platform supported by ropes suspended from components cantilevered out from a building or other structure, and includes a swingstage, a boatswain’s chair and a multi-point suspended scaffold;
(ap) “swingstage” means a scaffold with a work platform supported by two ropes;
(aq) “temporary flooring” means a horizontal working surface that
(i) is designed to give access to areas that do not have permanent flooring, and
(ii) will prevent a worker from falling;
(ar) “thimble” means a metal insert for the inside of a wire rope eye, used when forming an attachment loop, to prevent wear on the rope;
(as) “wooden carpenter’s portable bracket scaffold” means a triangular wooden bracket scaffold with gussets that is attached to a vertical wall when in use and which does not normally have another means of support during use;
(at) “work area” means a location at the workplace at which an employee is, or may be required or permitted to be, stationed and includes a work platform; and
(au) “work platform” means a temporary horizontal working surface that provides access and support to a person at the workplace.

Duties of workplace parties
4 (1) A specific duty provided for in these regulations does not limit the generality of any other duty contained in the Act or any other regulations in force under the authority of the Act.
(2) A duty or requirement imposed on an employer or an employee pursuant to these regulations applies to a self-employed person, with such modifications as the circumstances require.

Measurements of lumber
5 Measurements of lumber in these regulations are nominal for dressed dimensions, unless rough lumber or dimensions are specified.
Inconsistencies with incorporated standards
6 Where there is an inconsistency between a standard or a manufacturer’s specification referred to in these regulations and a requirement of these regulations, the requirement of these regulations shall prevail.

Part II: Fall Protection
Fall protection required
7 (1) Where a person is exposed to the hazard of falling from a work area that is
(a) 3 m or more above the nearest safe surface or water;
(b) above a surface or thing that could cause injury to the person upon contact; or
(c) above an open tank, pit or vat containing hazardous material,
(i) the person shall wear a fall arrest system that includes a full body harness, a lanyard and an anchor point and that otherwise complies with Section 8,
(ii) a guardrail shall be provided that meets the requirements of Section 9,
(iii) a personnel safety net shall be provided that meets the requirements of Section 10,
(iv) temporary flooring shall be provided that meets the requirements of Section 14, or
(v) a means of fall protection shall be provided that provides a level of safety equal to or greater than a fall arrest system.
(2) Despite subsection (1)
(a) where a person is entering or exiting a work area by a safe means of access and egress, the requirements of subsection (1) do not apply; and
(b) where work must be performed on or from a vehicle, rail car or other mobile equipment, fall protection is required only where and to the extent reasonably practicable;
(c) where it would not be practical to perform work other than from a ladder and it is not practical for the worker to maintain three points of contact while performing the work, fall protection is required only where and to the extent practical; and
(d) where density of tree branches prevents an arborist from crotching, fall protection is required only where and to the extent practical.
(3) Where a person is exposed to the hazard of falling from a work area that is in a location other than those specified in clauses (1)(a), (b) or (c) and an officer determines that fall protection is required, fall protection shall be used.

Fall arrest systems
8 (1) A fall arrest system shall
(a) be adequately secured to
(i) an anchor point, or
(ii) a lifeline that is
(A) securely fastened to an anchor point, or
(B) attached to a static line that is securely fastened to an anchor point
that is capable of withstanding either the maximum load likely to be imposed on the anchor point or a load of 17.8 kN, whichever is greater;
(b) include a lanyard that
(i) is attached to an anchor point or lifeline, where practicable, above the shoulder of the user, and
(ii) complies with CSA Standard Z259.1-1995, “Fall Arresting Safety Belts and Lanyards for the Construction and Mining Industries”;
(c) prevent a free fall greater than 1.22 m where
(i) the fall arrest system is not equipped with a shock absorption system that complies with CSA Standard Z259.11-M92, “Safety Belts and Lanyards”, and that reduces the shock level of any fall to less than 4 kN; or
(ii) the combined free fall and shock absorbed deceleration distance exceeds the distance between the work area and a safe surface; and
(d) include a full body harness that
(i) is attached to a lanyard,
(ii) is adjusted to fit the user of the harness, and
(iii) complies with CSA Standard Z259.10-M90, “Full Body Harnesses”.
(2) A lifeline in a fall arrest system shall
(a) be made of
(i) polypropylene rope with a nominal diameter of at least 16 mm, or
(ii) other durable material that provides at least equal protection to the user as polypropylene rope with a nominal diameter of at least 16 mm;
(b) extend to a safe surface;
(c) be secured at the base to prevent tangling or disturbance of the line;
(d) be securely attached to an anchor point;
(e) be free of knots, lubricants and imperfections;
(f) be free of splices, except as are necessary to connect the lifeline to an anchor point;
(g) be provided with softeners at all sharp edges or corners to protect against cuts or chafing;
(h) be protected from corrosion;
(i) be used by no more than one person at a time;
(j) comply with CSA Standard Z259.2-M1979, “Fall Arresting Devices, Personnel Lowering Devices and Life Lines”;
(k) be clearly identified as a lifeline by colour or by another means that provides an equivalent level of safety; and
(l) not be used for other purposes.
(3) Despite clause (2)(a), where a lifeline may be damaged by heat or corrosive material, it shall be made of wire rope that has a diameter of at least 8 mm.
(4) A ropegrab used in a fall arrest system shall comply with CSA Standard Z259.2-M1979, “Fall Arresting Devices, Personnel Lowering Devices and Life Lines”.
(5) Each component of a fall arrest system, including each lifeline, shall be inspected by a competent person prior to each use to determine whether there are any defective, or otherwise unsafe components and if a defect is observed, no person shall use or permit the use of the system until the defective components are replaced or repaired.
(6) A fall arrest system that has arrested a fall shall
(a) be removed from service and inspected by a competent person; and
(b) be repaired to the original manufacturer’s specifications or destroyed, when a defect is observed.
(7) A static line shall have a nominal diameter of at least 12.7 mm and shall
(a) be equipped with vertical supports at least every 9 m;
(b) have a maximum deflection, when taut, of no greater than 381 mm for a 9 m span;
(c) be equipped with turnbuckles or other comparable tightening device that provides an equivalent level of protection, at the ends of the line;
(d) be made of Improved Plow Wire Rope;
(e) be equipped with softeners at all sharp edges or corners to protect against cuts or chafing; and
(f) be made only of components that are able to withstand either the maximum load likely to be imposed on the components or a load of 8 kN, whichever is greater.
(8) Despite subsections (1), (2), (3), (4) and (7), a fall arrest system for arborists shall
(a) include an approved tree climbing or tree trimming harness or saddle;
(b) be adequately secured to
(i) an anchor point, or
(ii) a lifeline that is
(A) securely fastened to an anchor point, or
(B) attached to a static line that is securely fastened to an anchor point;
(c) include an approved climbing rope or safety strap;
(d) where practicable, include a second approved climbing rope or safety strap that
(i) provides additional stability, and
(ii) back-up fall protection; and
(e) be capable of withstanding either the maximum load likely to be imposed or a load of 17.8 kN, whichever is greater.
(9) Arborists shall
(a) before climbing,
(i) visually assess the structural stability of the tree,
(ii) select and assess the safest path of ascent, and
(iii) select an appropriate crotch position as a work area;
(b) work, wherever practicable, from a crotch position, with a fall arrest system secured to an anchor point above the crotch position;
(c) when changing crotch positions, remain secured by a fall arrest system to the anchor point for the previous crotch position until secured by a fall arrest system to the anchor point for the next crotch position;
(d) not change crotch positions without selecting the next crotch position in advance;
(e) ensure that slack in ropes or lines that are part of the fall arrest system, if any, is
(i) essential to the performance of the work, and
(ii) no greater than is consistent with the safe performance of the work;
(f) not climb above the anchor point unless secured by another fall arrest system secured at or above the level of the arborist;
(g) not work in crews of less than two, one member of which shall remain on the ground; and
(h) when transferring from a power operated work platform to a tree, remain attached by way of fall arrest system to an anchor point on the platform until secured by way of fall arrest system to an anchor point on the tree.

Guardrails
9 (1) A guardrail shall be provided,
(a) around an uncovered opening in a floor or other surface;
(b) at the perimeter or other open side of
(i) a floor, mezzanine, balcony or other surface, and
(ii) a work area, where a person is exposed to the hazard of a fall described in subsection 7(1).
(2) A guardrail shall be constructed or installed
(a) with posts that
(i) are spaced at intervals of not more than 2.4 metres, and
(ii) are secured against movement by the attachment of the posts to the structure under construction or that is otherwise being worked on, or by another means that provides an equivalent level of safety;
(b) with a top railing that is between 0.91 and 1.06 m above the surface of the protected working area and that is securely fastened to posts secured in compliance with subclause 9(2)(a)(ii);
(c) with a toeboard, securely attached to the posts and the structure to which the posts are secured, extending from the base of the posts to a height of 102 mm; and
(d) with an intermediate railing on the inner side of the posts midway between the top railing and the toeboard.
(3) A guardrail consisting of wood shall, in addition to the requirements of subsection (2),
(a) have top and intermediate railings and posts that are at least 51 mm x 102 mm;
(b) have a toeboard that is at least 25 mm x 75 mm; and
(c) be made of Number One Grade spruce or other lumber that provides an equivalent level of safety.
(4) A guardrail consisting of wire rope shall, in addition to the requirements of subsection (2),
(a) have wire rope railings that are at least 8 mm thick;
(b) be identified with high visibility markings placed every 1.5 m on the top railing; and
(c) have railings with turnbuckles or other means that provide adequate tension to ensure an equivalent level of protection to that provided by a wooden guardrail.
(5) A manufactured guardrail may be used in place of a wooden or wire rope guardrail if it provides an equivalent level of protection to that provided by a wooden guardrail.
(6) No guardrail is required around an opening in a floor or other surface if the opening is covered with fastened planks, plywood or other material where the covering
(a) is capable of supporting four times the maximum load likely to be imposed;
(b) is secured to prevent lateral and upward movement; and
(c) is identified by a sign that warns of the potential hazard.

Personnel safety nets
10 (1) Where used as a means of fall protection, a personnel safety net shall
(a) be installed not more than 4.6 m below the work area; and
(b) where another means of fall protection meeting the requirements of Section 7 is not used, extend 2.4 m on all sides beyond the work area.
(2) A personnel safety net shall be manufactured, used, maintained, inspected and stored in accordance with ANSI standard A10.11-1989, “Safety Nets Used During Construction, Repair and Demolition Operations”.
(3) Despite subsection (2),
(a) a personnel safety net shall be installed and maintained so that the maximum deflection when arresting the fall of a person does not allow any portion of the person to contact another surface;
(b) the splice joints that connect two or more safety nets shall be equal or greater in strength to the nets; and
(c) there shall be no obstructions or intervening members that may be struck during a fall between the work area and the personnel safety net.

Debris nets
11 (1) Where persons having access to an area below an elevated work area are exposed to the hazard of falling objects from the work area, a debris net, or other means of protection that provides an equivalent level of protection from falling objects and debris, shall be used.
(2) A debris net shall be
(a) manufactured, used, maintained, inspected and stored in accordance with ANSI standard A10.11-1989, “Safety Nets Used During Construction, Repair and Demolition Operations”; and
(b) despite clause (a), installed not more than 4.6 m below the elevated work area.
12 One net may be used for the purpose of a personnel safety net and a debris net if it meets the requirements specified in these regulations for personnel safety nets.

Safety belts
13 A safety belt used as a means of fall protection shall comply with
(a) CSA Standard Z259.1-1995, “Safety Belts and Lanyards; or
(b) CSA Standard Z259.3-M1978, “Lineman’s Body Belt and Lineman’s Safety Strap”.

Temporary flooring
14 (1) Where temporary flooring is used, it shall be installed at each floor level where work is in progress.
(2) Temporary flooring shall,
(a) except for any openings necessary for the carrying out of work, extend over the whole work area;
(b) be able to withstand four times the maximum load likely to be imposed on it; and
(c) be securely fastened to and supported on members that are able to withstand four times the maximum load likely to be imposed.

Risk of drowning
15 (1) A personal floatation device shall comply with CGSB standard CGSB 65.11-M88, “Personal Floatation Devices”.
(2) Where a person is exposed to the hazard of falling from a work area and there is a risk of drowning,
(a) a personal floatation device shall be worn where the work area is less than 3 m above the surface of the water;
(b) rescue equipment shall be provided that includes
(i) an adequate motor boat to ensure a safe and timely rescue,
(ii) a life buoy with 15 m of polypropylene rope that is at least 10 mm in diameter or that is made from material that provides an equivalent level of protection,
(iii) a boat hook,
(iv) an audible alarm system to notify of an accident and to initiate the rescue procedure; and
(c) persons who are
(i) designated to perform specific rescue tasks,
(ii) properly informed as to the proper rescue procedures, and
(iii) trained in the use of the rescue equipment in order to perform rescue operations safely, shall be available in such numbers as are needed in the circumstances to perform rescue operations safely.
(3) Where work is being done above water that has a fast current and where practicable, a line shall be placed across the water
(a) that is made of polypropylene rope that is 10 mm in diameter or material that provides an equivalent level of protection; and
(b) that has buoys or some other floatation device attached.
(4) For greater certainty, subsection (2) does not apply where persons are protected by fall protection in accordance with subsection 7(1).

Building shafts
16 Where there is no work platform installed at the level of a doorway or opening in a building shaft, the guardrail that is installed in accordance with these regulations shall be marked with a warning sign that indicates the presence of an open building shaft.

Roof work
17 (1) Where work is being done from or near the edge of a roof that has a slope of less than 3/12 in circumstances described in subsection 7(1), fall protection shall be provided, in accordance with Section 7.
(2) Where work is being done from or on a roof that has a slope that is greater than or equal to 3/12 but less than 6/12, under circumstances described in subsection 7(1), a fully decked scaffold or roof brackets and planks shall be installed at the base of the roof.
(3) Where work is being done from a roof that has a slope that is greater than or equal to 6/12 but less than 9/12, under circumstances described in subsection 7(1), roof brackets and planks shall be installed as work progresses on the roof.
(4) Where work is done from the edge of a roof that has a slope that is greater than or equal to 3/12 but less than 9/12, under circumstances described in subsection 7(1), then in addition to the requirements of subsection (2) or (3), a fully decked scaffold work platform or a fall arrest system shall be used.
(5) Where work is done from or on a roof that has a slope greater than or equal to 9/12, under circumstances described in subsection 7(1), a fully decked scaffold work platform, roof brackets.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following is © Queen’s Printer for Ontario, 2009 – 2009

Occupational Health and Safety Act – R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 851

52. A crane, lift truck or similar equipment shall be used to support, raise or lower a worker only when,
(a) the worker is on a platform,
(i) equipped with adequate safety devices that will automatically prevent the platform and load from falling if the platform’s normal support fails,
(ii) suspended from a boom that does not move, and the person is attached to a separate lifeline suspended from the boom or a fixed support capable of supporting at least four times the weight of the worker, or
(iii) attached to a mast, or boom which,
(A) is hydraulically or pneumatically operated, and
(B) is equipped with a safety device that will prevent free fall of the platform in the event of a pressure line failure;

85. Where a worker is exposed to the hazard of falling and the surface to which he or she might fall is more than three metres below the position where he or she is situated,
(a) the worker shall wear a serviceable safety belt or harness and lifeline adequately secured to a fixed support and so arranged that the worker cannot fall freely for a vertical distance of more than 1.5 metres; and
(b) the fall arresting system described in clause (a) shall,
(i) have sufficient capacity to absorb twice the energy and twice the load that under the circumstances of its use may be transmitted to it, and
(ii) be equipped with a shock absorber or other devices to limit the maximum arresting force to 8.0 kilonewtons to the wearer. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 851, s. 85.

86. Where a worker is exposed to the hazard of falling into liquid that is of sufficient depth for a life jacket to be effective as protectionfrom the risk of drowning, there shall be an alarm system and rescue equipment, appropriate in the circumstances, to ensure the worker’s rescue from the liquid and,
(a) the worker shall wear a life jacket; or
(b) the employer shall develop written measures and procedures to prevent the worker from drowning and shall implement them. O. Reg. 284/99, s. 1.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following material is © Government of Prince Edward Island

Cap. O-1.01 Occupational Health and Safety Act

PART 13

CONFINED SPACE

In a confined space:
13.3 The employer shall ensure that a confined space in which there exists or is likely to exist
(a) a hazardous accumulation of gas, vapour, dust, mist, smoke or fumes; or
(b) an oxygen content of less than 19.5% or more than 23% at atmospheric pressure is entered only when

(k) the employee entering the space is wearing an approved safety harness with attached life line that will permit that employee to be removed from the space; if more than one employee is working in the space, steps have been taken to ensure that the life lines do not become entangled;
(l) another employee is stationed outside the confined space and in addition, equipment and persons are available to ensure immediate removal of employees within the space;
(m) all safety equipment to be used in the confined space has been inspected by a competent person and is in good working order. (EC180/87)

PART 14

BINS AND HOPPERS

14.1 Employees shall be provided with and shall wear approved safety belts with life line attached and properly anchored when working at elevations greater than 3 m (10 ft.) above grade where adequate working platforms or stagings are not provided. (EC180/87)
14.2 Employees shall be provided with and shall wear approved safety harnesses with life line attached and properly anchored when entering bins, hoppers, chambers or vessels where there is a danger of being trapped or buried by the movement of material, or where there is a danger of falling into pits, shafts or moving machinery. (EC180/87)
14.4 When employees are required to work in bins, hoppers, chambers or vessels where there is danger of being overcome by contaminated air or lack of oxygen or where there is danger of being buried by movement of material, an employee shall be stationed in a position where he can readily effect the rescue of the employee exposed to the hazardous condition.
- Ropes for life lines shall be as specified in C.S.A. Standard Z259.2.
- Life lines shall be connected for use so that there will be the least practicable amount of slack line in order to limit the free fall of the employee.
- No more than one employee shall be attached to one life line. (EC180/87)
14.5 This Part does not apply when a net or equivalent protection has been provided for steel erectors or similar tradesmen who are experienced in working at heights and where the use of a safety belt or life line may produce an additional hazard. (EC180/87)

23.7 (1) The employer shall ensure that a fixed ladder more than 6 096 mm (20 ft.) in length is provided with
(a) a safety rail secured to the ladder; or
(b) cage guards with offset platforms at intervals not greater than 9 144 mm (30 ft.); or
(b) adequate fall arresting equipment.
(2) The employer shall ensure that employees working on fixed ladders more than 6 096 mm (20 ft.) in length shall wear adequate fall arresting equipment.
(3) Employees working on fixed ladders more than 6 096 mm (20 ft.) in length shall wear adequate fall arresting equipment.
(4) Where a safety rail is used, the employer shall provide an approved safety belt designed to be attached to the rail and all employees shall wear the safety belt and attach it to the rail. (EC180/87)

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following is © Gouvernement du Québec, 2009 c. S-2.1, r.19.01

Regulation respecting occupational health and safety

An Act respecting occupational health and safety R.S.Q., c. S-2.1, s. 223. 1st par. subpar. (1), (3), (4), (7) to (16), (18) to (21.1), (41) and (42), 2nd par. and 3rd par

DIVISION I
INTERPRETATION AND SCOPE

1. Definitions: In this regulation, the following words and expressions mean:

“aerial basket lifting device“: any elevator equipped with an extendable/retractable or jointed arm designed to be fitted with a carrier and used to lift workers or supplies by means of a basket on work sites ;

“hoisting apparatus“: includes cranes, travelling cranes, gantries, winches, blocks, lift trucks, aerial basket lifting devices, work platform lifts, screw-type jacks, rack-type jacks and other similar apparatus but does not include elevators and dumb-waiters ;

“protective device“: set of devices which when used alone or with a protector on machinery, eliminates dangers or reduces risks for the health, safety and physical well-being of workers ;

DIVISION II
GENERAL PROVISIONS

3. Purpose: The purpose of this Regulation is to establish standards pertaining in particular to the quality of air, temperature, humidity, heat stress, lighting, noise and other contaminants, sanitary facilities, ventilation, hygiene, sanitation and cleanliness in establishments, area conditions, storage and handling of dangerous substances, machine and tool safety, certain high risk tasks, individual protective equipment and the transportation of workers to ensure the quality of the work environment, to safeguard the health of workers and to ensure their safety and physical well-being.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 3.

4. Employer’s obligations: The employer shall comply with the standards set hereunder, with the exception of those of section 339.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 4.
5. Operational status of equipment: Any equipment used or installed in an establishment for purposes of preventing the emission of gases, dusts, fumes and vapours, to ensure proper conditions for lighting, ventilation, temperature, salubrity and hygiene prescribed hereunder or to ensure that noise or heat stress conditions comply with the requirements hereunder, shall always be in operational condition and shall give optimal performance during the establishment’s business hours in such manner as to provide the performance for which it was designed.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 5.

DIVISION III
ESTABLISHMENT CONDITIONS

9. Horizontal openings: Excavations, wells or basins presenting a falling hazard shall be solidly covered or protected with guardrails on all exposed sides.

The same applies to vats, tanks, reservoirs, basins and other containers used for the storing or mixing of substances that are open and whose opening is less than 750 millimetres above floor level or above a working platform.

This section does not apply to basins used for recreational or fish-breeding purposes.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 9.

10. Vertical openings: Any opening made through a wall that presents a falling hazard for a worker or for any object shall be protected with a guardrail or a protective screen.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 10.

11. Exceptions: Sections 9 and 10 do not apply when the use of a cover, guardrail or protective screen prevents the carrying out of a task that could not be reasonably performed otherwise.

In such a case, the cover, guardrail or protective screen may be removed, but only while the work is being performed. The wearing of a safety harness is then compulsory for any worker exposed to a danger of falling in the opening, except if the worker is protected by some other device that provides him with equivalent safety or by a safety net.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 11.

12. Guardrails: Any guardrail incorporated in a building, with the exception of a guardrail that is part of any equipment, shall comply with the National Building Code as applied at the time of its installation.
Other guardrails shall be so designed, constructed and installed as to withstand the following minimum loads:
(1) a 0,55 kilonewton horizontal single point load applied at any location on the top rail ;
(2) a 1,5 kilonewtons per linear metre load applied vertically at the top rail.
In addition, such guardrails shall be provided with a top rail located between 900 millimetres and 1 100 millimetres from the floor and at least an intermediate rail fixed at midway between the top rail and the floor.
The intermediate rail may be replaced by balusters or panels.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 12.

23. Permanent ladders: Permanent ladders used to replace service stairs shall
(1) be of safe construction and solidly anchored to withstand a mass of 90 kilograms at the centre of the rungs with a safety factor of 4;
(2) for ladders exceeding 9 metres, have rest platforms equipped with guardrails, at least at 6-metre intervals;
(3) have a space behind the rungs of at least 150 millimetres;
(4) have a free space on each side of at least 375 millimetres and forward of at least 800 millimetres, measured from the centre of a rung;
(5) extend 900 millimetres beyond the top storey;
(6) be provided with guardrails surrounding the floor opening with a removable gate for access to the ladder;
(7) be provided with crinolines or cages or a fall arrestor in compliance with the standard Fall arresters, vertical lifelines and rails CAN/CSA Z259.2.1-98, where there is danger of a fall greater than 6 metres.

Subparagraphs (3) and (4) of the first paragraph only applies to permanent ladders built, installed or modified starting from 2 August 2001.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 23.

33. Operating conditions: Scaffolds shall be designed for the type of work to be performed and the probable risks. They shall meet the following conditions:
(1) be so designed, constructed, trussed, braced and maintained as to support any loads and stresses they may be subjected to, and resist wind action;
(2) have a safety factor of at least 4 for each constituent element;
(3) rest on firm ground or foundations;
(4) be provided with guardrails when workers are exposed to a danger of falling more than 3 metres.

The guardrails of the scaffolds may be temporarily removed if they prevent the carrying out of work that cannot reasonably be performed otherwise. In these cases, the wearing of a safety harness is compulsory for the worker and the worksite shall be marked off to prevent access to those persons not working there.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 33.

DIVISION XXIII
HANDLING AND TRANSPORTING MATERIAL

261. Lifting of a worker: The lifting of a worker using a mobile crane is permitted if the conditions set out in section 3.10.7 of the Safety Code for the construction industry (c. S-2.1, r. 6) as it reads at the time that it applies, are respected.
264. Protection against falls: The wearing of a safety harness is compulsory for any worker occupying the aerial basket of a lifting device, except if the worker is protected by some other device that provides him with equivalent safety.

A safety harness shall be equipped with an energy absorber and a lifeline attached to an anchorage point specified by the manufacturer or any other anchorage point independent of the basket and offering a resistance to breakage of at least 18 kilonewtons per worker who is anchored thereto.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 264.

268. Aerial conveyor: Subject to section 324, an aerial conveyor shall be equipped with a footbridge in compliance with section 31, when there is a danger of falling, and when workers must circulate on the conveyor.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 268.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following is Copyright©2009 The Queen’s Printer, Saskatchewan

The Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, 1996

Protection against falling
116(1) In this section and sections 116.1 to 116.3:
(a) “anchor point” or “anchor plate” means a secure connecting point capable of safely withstanding the impact forces applied by a fall protection system;
(b) “control zone” means the area within two metres of an unguarded edge of a level, elevated work surface of three metres or more in height;
(c) “fall protection system” means:
(i) a control zone as required pursuant to section 116.2;
(ii) a personal fall arrest system;
(iii) a safety net; or
(iv) a travel restraint system;
(d) “permanent” means intended and designed to last indefinitely;
(e) “similar barrier” means any barrier that the employer or contractor can demonstrate provides a level of protection that is at least equivalent to a guardrail;
(f) “temporary” means:
(i) designed to be removed by the last workers using it before commissioning or turnover to the contractor or owner; and
(ii) intended and designed to last not more than one year;
(g) “travel restraint system” means a system that prevents a worker from travelling to the edge of a structure or to a work position from which the worker could fall.
(2) An employer or contractor shall ensure that workers use a fall protection system at a temporary or permanent work area where:
(a) a worker may fall three metres or more; or
(b) there is a possibility of injury if a worker falls less than three metres.
(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker at a permanent work area is protected from falling by a guardrail or similar barrier if the worker may fall a vertical distance of more than 1.2 metres and less than three metres.
(4) Notwithstanding subsection (3), where the use of a guardrail or similar barrier is not reasonably practicable, an employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker uses a travel restraint system.
(5 ) Notwithstanding subsection (4), where the use of a travel restraint system is not reasonably practicable, an employer or contractor shall ensure that a safety net or control zone or other equally effective means that protects the worker from falling is used.
(6) Subsection (2) does not apply to competent workers who are engaged in:
(a) connecting the structural members of a skeletal steel structure or a pre-cast structure;
(b) connecting the support structure of a scaffold;
(c) stabilizing or securing the load on a truck or trailer;
(d) installing or attaching a fall protection system to the anchor point;
(e) removing or disassembling the associated parts of a fall protection system when it is no longer required; or
(f) activities within the normal course of business on a permanent loading dock that is not greater than 1.2 metres in height.
10 Aug 2007 SR 67/2007 s11.

Fall protection plan
116.1(1) An employer or contractor shall develop a written fall protection plan where:
(a) a worker may fall three metres or more; and
(b) workers are not protected by a guardrail or similar barrier.
(2) The fall protection plan required by subsection (1) must describe:
(a) the fall hazards at the worksite;
(b) the fall protection system to be used at the worksite;
(c) the procedures used to assemble, maintain, inspect, use and disassemble the fall protection system; and
(d) the rescue procedures to be used if a worker falls, is suspended by a personal fall arrest system or safety net and needs to be rescued.
(3) The employer or contractor shall ensure that a copy of the fall protection plan is readily available before work begins at a worksite where a risk of falling exists.
(4) The employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker is trained in the fall protection plan and the safe use of the fall protection system before allowing the worker to work in an area where a fall protection system must be used.
10 Aug 2007 SR 67/2007 s11.

Control zone
116.2(1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a control zone:
(a) is only used if a worker can fall from a level surface in a work area; and
(b) is not less than two metres wide when measured from the unguarded edge.
(2) When crossing a control zone mentioned in subsection (1), a worker:
(a) subject to subsection (4) is not required to use a fall protection system, other than the control zone, to enter or leave the work area; and
(b) shall follow the most direct route to get to or from the unguarded edge.
(3) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a control zone is clearly marked with an effective raised warning line or other equally effective method if a worker is working more than two metres from an unguarded edge.
(4) An employer or contractor shall ensure that a worker who has to work within a control zone uses:
(a) a travel restraint system; or
(b) a means that is as equally effective as a travel restraint system and that prevents the worker from getting to the unguarded edge.
10 Aug 2007 SR 67/2007 s11.

Anchor Points and Anchor Plates
116.3(1) Where a worker uses a personal fall arrest system or a travel restraint system, an employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that an anchor point or anchor plate that meets the requirements of this section is used as part of that system.
(2) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that a temporary anchor point used in a travel restraint system:
(a) has an ultimate load capacity of at least 3.5 kilonewtons (800 pounds-force) per worker attached in any direction in which the load may be applied;
(b) is installed and used according to the manufacturer’s specifications;
(c) is permanently marked as being for travel restraint only; and
(d) is removed by the last worker from use on the earlier of:
(i) the date the work project for which it is intended is completed; and
(ii) the time specified by the manufacturer.
(3) An employer, contractor or owner shall ensure that a permanent anchor point used in a travel restraint system associated with any new construction project on or after the date this section comes into force:
(a) has an ultimate load capacity of at least 8.75 kilonewtons (2 000 pounds-force) per worker attached in any direction in which the load may be applied;
(b) is installed and used according to the manufacturer’s specifications; and
(c) is permanently marked as being for travel restraint only.
(4) In the case of a personal fall arrest system installed on or after one year after the date this section comes into force, an employer, contractor, owner or supplier
shall ensure that anchor points to which the personal fall arrest system is attached have an ultimate load capacity of at least 22.2 kilonewtons (5000 pounds-force) per worker attached in any direction in which the load may be applied.
(5) An employer, contractor, owner or supplier shall ensure that the following types of equipment that are components of fall protection systems, and their
installation, conform to the manufacturer’s specifications or are certified by a professional engineer:
(a) permanent anchor points;
(b) anchors with multiple attachment points;
(c) permanent horizontal lifeline systems;
(d) support structures for safety nets.
10 Aug 2007 SR 67/2007 s11.

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