aerial lift training

Aerial Lift Training Online

An aerial lift is a necessary piece of equipment for many businesses. While these types of machinery make jobs easier, they can also present safety problems. This course explores a wide variety of lifting and hoisting machinery, teaching your employees how to stay safe on the job.

  • Pricing

  • 1-10 units: $124.95
  • 11-25 units: $99.95
  • 26-50 units: $84.95
  • 51-100 units: $69.95
  • 101-500 units: $49.95
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Our Aerial Lift training online provides better cost savings and more flexibility than in-class training.Whether your business and its employees utilize aerial lifts, self propelled elevated work platforms, or scissor lifts, or self propelled boom supported elevated work platforms, also known as a genie boom, the right training can save lives, increase work-related productivity, reduce the number of accidents, and lower the risk of expensive liability for your business. In just 75 minutes, your employees can learn how to perform an adequate pre-operational check, how to implement fall protection strategies, and how to safely operate an aerial lift, elevating work platforms, or self propelled boom supported elevated work platforms. While this course is known simply as the Aerial Lift Training Program, it is actually a comprehensive evaluation of many different hoisting mechanisms.
Here’s what you can expect to learn with this training:

  • Hazard Identification
  • Aerial Lift Devices and Operating Controls
  • Pre-Operational Check for Aerial Lift Devices
  • Platform Positioning and Park Positioning

Who Needs Aerial Lift Learning?

There are many different types of employees who can benefit from this training. Individuals required to operate aerial lift machinery such as a mobile crane or other lifting device, supervisors of workers who use elevating work platforms, and Health and Safety committee members or representatives in charge of inspecting these devices should all be required to take this comprehensive and engaging online learning course.

Please note: Upon successful completion of this online course, a certificate will be generated and will require a signature by a competent person verifying the hands-on practical evaluation. This evaluation must be performed at the workplace of the person requiring certification.

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Hazard Identification

  • Decals, stickers, capacity limits for aerial lifts
  • Electrocution hazard, earthing, wind, tip over, tilt alarm
  • Pushing and pulling, fall hazards equipment condition
  • Collision, fire, explosion, battery, propane (LPG), frost

Aerial Lift Devices and Operating Controls

  • Self propelled elevated work platforms, scissor lift, genie, zoom boom
  • On slab and off slab scissor
  • Telescoping unit, boom and telescoping articulating boom
  • Ground control panel, platform, turntable rotate, boom extend / retract Jib & secondary boom, platform level, emergency stop, engine high idle

Pre Operational Checks for Aerial Lift Devices

  • Visual & practical inspections of aerial lifts
  • Electrical, hydraulic, tires, nuts, bolts, rails & chains, limit switches, safety arm, pothole protectors, scissor pins, joystick, steering, driving, braking, tilt sensor, battery, auxiliary power, limit switch
  • Check sheet & record keeping

Platform Positioning & Park Positioning

  • Park position, parking hazards (holes, pipes, power-lines, wind & weather, drop offs, bumps, cracks
  • Testing park position & turning off safely
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All our online training meets provincial and federal regulations. For specific outlines please select your province below.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following is © 1995 – 2010 Government of Alberta.

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE 2009

Elevating Platforms and Aerial Devices Worker safety
346(1) An employer must ensure that a worker is not travelling in a basket, bucket, platform or other elevated or aerial device that is moving on a road or work site if road conditions, traffic, overhead wires, cables or other obstructions create a danger to the worker.
346(2) A person must not travel in a basket, bucket, platform or other elevated or aerial device that is moving on a road or work site if road conditions, traffic, overhead wires, cables or other obstructions create a danger to the person.

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Part 6 Cranes, Hoists and Lifting Devices
General Requirements

Application
59(1) This Part applies to lifting devices, including cranes and hoists, with a rated load capacity of 2000 kilograms or more.
59(1.1) This Part does not apply to drawworks on equipment that is subject to Part 37.
59(2) Sections 60 to 74 apply to roofer’s hoists regardless of their rated load capacity.
59(2.1) A hoist may only be used for vertical lifting or lowering if it complies with this Part and is designed and manufactured for vertical lifting or lowering.
59(3) Despite subsection (2), sections 63, 64(4) and 65 do not apply to roofer’s hoists.
59(4) Despite subsection (1), an employer must ensure that a lifting device with a rated load capacity of less than 2000 kilograms has the rated load capacity of the equipment shown on the equipment.

Not commercially manufactured
60 If a lifting device is not commercially manufactured, an employer must ensure that it is fit and safe for use as a lifting device and that it is certified by a professional engineer.

Identification of components
61 An employer must ensure that all major structural, mechanical and electrical components of a lifting device are permanently and legibly identified as being component parts of a specific make and model of lifting device.

Rated load capacity
62(1) An employer must ensure that a lifting device has a plate or weatherproof label permanently secured to it that legibly shows
(a) the manufacturer’s rated load capacity,
(b) the manufacturer’s name, and

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(c) the model, serial number and year of manufacture or shipment date.
62(2) If a lifting device is not commercially manufactured, an employer must ensure that it has a plate or weatherproof label permanently secured to it that legibly shows the rated load capacity according to the professional engineer’s certification.
62(3) Subsections (1) and (2) do not apply to A frames and gin poles.

Load charts
63(1) An employer must ensure that a mobile crane or boom truck is equipped at all times with load charts showing the rated load capacity of the mobile crane or boom truck at all permitted boom angles and boom radii.
63(2) An employer must ensure that a tower crane has a load chart
(a) conspicuously and permanently secured to the cab, and
(b) showing the manufacturer’s rated capacity loads at various radii of a Two part line and a four part line separately.

Operator requirements
64(1) An employer must ensure that a lifting device is only operated by a competent worker authorized by the employer to operate the equipment.
64(2) At the employer’s request, an operator, before operating a lifting device, must be able to demonstrate that the worker is competent in the equipment’s operation and knowledgeable about load charts and the code of signals for hoisting operations.
64(3) No worker other than the competent worker authorized by the employer may operate a lifting device.
64(4) Before operating a particular lifting device, the operator must be familiar with all recent entries in its log book.

Log books
65(1) An employer must set up a paper or electronic log book for each lifting
device at a work site.
65(1.1) Despite subsection (1), the log book requirement does not apply to manually operated hoists.

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65(2) The employer must ensure that
(a) the log book is readily available for inspection by an officer at any time,
(b) the most current log book of a mobile crane accompanies it or is available to the operator at all times, and
(c) if ownership of a lifting device is transferred to a new owner, the log book is transferred to the new owner.
65(3) The employer must ensure that the following details are entered into the log book:
(a) the date and time when any work was performed on the lifting device;
(b) length of time in lifting service
(i) recorded as hours of service if the lifting device is equipped by the manufacturer with an hour meter, or
(ii) if required by the manufacturer’s specifications;
(c) all defects or deficiencies and when they were detected;
(d) inspections, including examinations, checks and tests, that are performed, including those specified in the manufacturer’s specifications;
(e) repairs or modifications performed;
(f) a record of a certification under section 73;
(g) any matter or incident that may affect the safe operation of the lifting device;
(h) any other operational information specifically identified by the employer;
(i) in the case of a tower crane, whether or not the weight testing device was lifted for that working day, before the work of lifting loads began.
65(4) The employer must ensure that each entry in a paper log book is signed by the person doing the work.
65(5) The employer must ensure that each entry in an electronic log book identifies the person doing the work.
65(6) In the case of a tower crane, the employer must ensure that a senior representative of the employer at the work site confirms that the entries in the log book are correct every day that the tower crane is in operation.

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Preventing an unsafe lift
66 If the operator of a lifting device has any doubts as to the safety of workers in the vicinity of the lift, the operator must not move any equipment or load until the operator is assured that the working conditions are safe.

Preventing collisions
67 An employer must ensure that procedures are developed to prevent collisions if two or more lifting devices are in use and there is the potential for a collision between them, their loads or component parts.

Load weight
68 An employer must ensure that the operator of the lifting device, the rigger supervised by the operator and the person in charge of a lift are provided with all the information necessary to enable them to readily and accurately determine the weight of the load to be lifted.

Lift calculation
68.1 An employer must ensure that a lift calculation is completed for any lift exceeding 75 percent of a crane’s rated capacity.

Loads over work areas
69(1) An employer must ensure that work is arranged, if it is reasonably practicable, so that a load does not pass over workers.
69(2) An operator of a lifting device must not pass the load on the device over workers unless
(a) no other practical alternative exists in the circumstances, and
(b) the workers are effectively warned of the danger.
69(3) A worker must not stand or pass under a suspended load unless the worker has been effectively warned of the danger and the operator of the lifting device knows the worker is under the suspended load.
69(4) The operator of a lifting device that is travelling with a load must ensure that the load is positioned as close to the ground or grade as possible.

Occupational Health and Safety Code 2009 Part 6
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Tag and hoisting lines
70(1) If workers are in danger because of the movement of a load being lifted, lowered or moved by a lifting device, an employer must ensure that
(a) a worker uses a tag line of sufficient length to control the load,
(b) the tag line is used in a way that prevents the load from striking the worker controlling the tag line, and
(c) a tag line is used when it allows worker separation from the load.
70(2) An employer must ensure that tag lines of non conductive synthetic rope are used when there is a danger of contact with energized electrical equipment.
70(3) An employer must ensure that tag lines are not used in situations where their use could increase the danger to workers.

Hand signals
71 An employer must ensure that hand signals necessary to ensure a safe hoisting operation are given in accordance with section 191 by a competent signaller designated by the employer.

Controls
72(1) Moved to section 95.1
72(2) Repealed
72(3) The employer must ensure that an operator who uses a remote control to operate a lifting device is visually distinguishable from other workers at the work site.

Repairs and modifications
73(1) An employer must ensure that structural repairs or modifications to components of a lifting device are
(a) made only under the direction and control of a professional engineer, and
(b) certified by the professional engineer to confirm that the workmanship and quality of materials used has restored the components to not less than their original capacity.

Occupational Health and Safety Code 2009 Part 6
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73(2) If structural repairs or modifications are made, the employer must ensure that
(a) the repaired or modified components are individually and uniquely identified in the log book and on the component, and
(b) the professional engineer’s certification makes reference to those components and their identification.

Containers for hoisting
74(1) An employer must ensure that a container used for a load being lifted by a hoist is designed for that particular purpose and bears a marking to indicate its maximum load rating.
74(2) A person must not use an oil drum or similar container as a container for a load being lifted by a hoist unless the drum or container is hoisted in a cage designed for that purpose.

A-Frames and gin poles
75 An employer must ensure that an A frame or gin pole
(a) is not inclined more than 45 degrees from the vertical,
(b) is equipped with a boom stop, and
(c) has the sheave and cap of its rigging attached securely enough to the gin pole to withstand any loads to which the assembly may be subjected.

Suspended personnel baskets
75.1(1) An employer must ensure that
(a) a commercially manufactured suspended personnel basket is erected, used, operated and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, or
(b) a suspended personnel basket that is not commercially manufactured is designed and certified by a professional engineer.
75.1(2) Despite section 147, if it is not practicable to provide a separate personal fall arrest system using a vertical lifeline for each worker in the man basket, an employer must ensure that
(a) a separate support is attached between the suspended personnel basket and the hoist line above the hook assembly that is capable of withstanding the weight of the personel basket, materials, equipment and workers should the hook assembly fail, and

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(b) each worker within the personnel basket is wearing a separate personal fall arrest system attached to the personnel basket.

Standards
347(1) An employer must ensure that a self propelled work platform manufactured on or after July1, 2009 with a boom supported elevating platform that telescopes, articulates, rotates or extends beyond the base dimensions of the platform meets the requirements of
(a) CSA Standard CAN/CSA B354.402, Self Propelled Boom Supported Elevating Work Platforms, or
(b) ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.5 2006, Boom Supported Elevating Work Platforms.
347(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to a work platform mounted on a motor vehicle.
347(3) An employer must ensure that a self propelled integral chassis elevating work platform manufactured on or after July1, 2009 with a platform that cannot be positioned laterally completely beyond the base and with its primary functions controlled from the platform meets the requirements of
(a) CSA Standard CAN/CSA B354.2 01 (R2006), Self Propelled Elevating Work Platforms, or
(b) ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.6 2006, Self Propelled Elevating Work Platforms.
347(4) An employer must ensure that a manually propelled, integral chassis elevating work platform manufactured on or after July1, 2009 with a platform that cannot be positioned laterally completely beyond the base, that may be adjusted manually or using power and that must not be occupied when moved horizontally meets the requirements of
(a) CSA Standard CAN3 B354.1 04, Portable elevating work platforms, or
(b) ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.3 2006, Manually Propelled Elevating Aerial Platforms.
347(5) An employer must ensure that a telescopic aerial device, aerial ladder, articulating aerial device, vertical tower, material lifting aerial device or a combination of any of them, when mounted on a motor vehicle, whether operated manually or using power, meets the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA C225 00 (R2005), Vehicle Mounted Aerial Devices.
347(6) An employer must ensure that a mast climbing elevating work platform that may be adjusted manually or using power meets the requirements of ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.9 1993, Mast Climbing Work Platforms.

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347(7) An employer must ensure that a vehicle mounted bridge inspection and maintenance elevating work platform meets the requirements of ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.8 1993 (R1998), Vehicle Mounted Bridge Inspection and Maintenance Devices.
347(8) An employer must ensure that an order picker meets the requirements of ASME Standard B56.12000, Safety Standard for Low Lift and High Lift Trucks.
347(9) An elevating work platform of a type not referred to in subsections (1) to (8) must meet a standard the use of which is approved by a Director of Inspection.

Permanent suspension powered work platforms
348(1) An employer must ensure that the platform of a permanent suspension powered work platform
(a) is constructed, installed, operated, tested, inspected, maintained, altered and repaired in accordance with CSA Standard CAN/CSAZ271 98 (R2004), Safety Code for Suspended Elevating Platforms, or
(b) if it was installed before April 30, 2004, is certified by a professional engineer.
348(2) For the purposes of subsection (1), the “rated capacity” in CSA Standard CAN/CSA Z27198 (R2004) is to be taken to mean the total weight of
(a) workers and hand tools, with a minimum aggregate weight of 115 kilograms per worker, and
(b) water and other equipment that the work platform is designed to lift at the rated speed.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.
The following is © 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 Copyright Workers’ Compensation Board of British Columbia, Richmond, B.C., Canada. All rights reserved.

Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Regulation

14.2 Standards

(1) Except as otherwise required by this Regulation, a crane or hoist must be designed, constructed, erected, disassembled, inspected, maintained and operated as specified by the manufacturer or a professional engineer, and to meet the requirements of the applicable standard listed in subsections (2) to (15).
(2) A bridge, jib, monorail, gantry or overhead travelling crane must meet the design requirements for electrical components and functions of CSA Standard C22.1-94, Canadian Electrical Code, Part 1, Section 40 and CSA Standard C22.2 No. 33-M1984 (Reaffirmed 1992), Construction and Test of Electric Cranes and Hoists.
(3) A bridge, jib, monorail, gantry or overhead travelling crane must meet the design requirements of
(a) ANSI Standard MH27.1-2003, Specifications for Patented Track Underhung Cranes and Monorail Systems,
(b) Crane Manufacturers Association of America (CMAA) Specifications for Top Running Bridge & Gantry Type Multiple Girder Electric Overhead Traveling Cranes — No. 70 (2004), or
(c) Crane Manufacturers Association of America (CMAA) Specifications for Top Running and Under Running Single Girder Electric Overhead Cranes Utilizing Under Running Trolley Hoist — No. 74 (2004).
(4) A bridge, jib, monorail, gantry or overhead travelling crane must meet the safety requirements of
(a) CSA Standard B167-96, Safety Standard for Maintenance and Inspection of Overhead Cranes, Gantry Cranes, Monorails, Hoists, and Trolleys,
(b) ANSI Standard ANSI/ASME B30.2-2005, Overhead and Gantry Cranes (Top Running Bridge, Single or Multiple Girder, Top Running Trolley Hoist),
(c) ANSI Standard ANSI/ASME B30.11-2004, Monorails and Underhung Cranes,
(d) ANSI Standard ANSI/ASME B30.16-2003, Overhead Hoists (Underhung), or
(e) ANSI Standard ANSI/ASME B30.17-2003, Overhead and Gantry Cranes (Top Running Bridge, Single Girder, Underhung Hoist).
(5) A mobile crane, telescoping or articulating boom truck or sign truck must meet the requirements of
(a) CSA Standard Z150-1998, Safety Code for Mobile Cranes,
(b) ANSI Standard ANSI/ASME B30.5-2004, Mobile and Locomotive Cranes, or
(c) ANSI Standard ANSI/ASME B30.22-2005, Articulating Boom Cranes.
(6) A tower, hammerhead crane or self erecting tower crane must meet the requirements of CSA Standard Z248-2004, Code for Tower Cranes.
(7) A portal, tower or pillar crane must meet the requirements of ANSI Standard ASME B30.4-2003, Portal, Tower, and Pillar Cranes.
(8) A construction material hoist must meet the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA-Z256-M87, Safety Code for Material Hoists.
(9) A chimney hoist must meet the requirements of WorkSafeBC Standard 14.116 Chimney Hoists.
(10) A base mounted drum hoist must meet the requirements of ANSI Standard ASME B30.7-2001, Base Mounted Drum Hoists.
(11) A guy, stiffleg, basket, breast, gin pole, Chicago boom, shearleg or A-frame derrick must meet the requirements of ANSI Standard ASME B30.6-2003, Derricks.
(12) A side boom tractor used for pipe laying or similar operations must meet the requirements of ANSI Standard ASME B30.14-2004, Side Boom Tractors.
(13) A manually lever operated hoist must meet the requirements of ANSI Standard B30.21-2005, Manually Lever Operated Hoists.
(14) A patient lift must meet the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA Z10535-03, Hoists for the Transfer of Disabled Persons-Requirements and Test Methods.
(15) A crane or hoist of a type not covered by the standards specified in subsections (2) to (14) must meet good engineering practice and be able to safely perform its function.
[Amended by B.C. Reg. 312/2003, effective October 29, 2003.] [Amended by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.3 Identification

(1) A crane or hoist must be permanently identified by the legible display of the manufacturer’s name, model and serial number on the structure.
(2) Each major interchangeable structural component of a crane or hoist must be uniquely identified and must be legibly marked to enable confirmation that the component is compatible with the crane or hoist.
(3) If a crane or hoist was not commercially manufactured and does not have a model number or serial number, the crane or hoist must not be used unless engineering documentation signed by a professional engineer, including technical specifications and instructions for use, are available at the workplace where the crane or hoist is being used.
(4) A crane or hoist described in subsection (3) must be identified in a manner that links the engineering documentation referred to in that subsection with that crane or hoist.
[Amended by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.4 Rated capacity

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.5 Rated capacity indication

(1) Subject to subsection (3), the rated capacity of a crane or hoist must be permanently indicated on the superstructure, hoist and load block of the equipment.
(2) The rated capacity of a monorail crane must be permanently marked on the hoist and at intervals not exceeding 10 m (33 ft) on the monorail beam.
(3) If the rated capacity of a crane or hoist is affected by
(a) the vertical or horizontal angle of a boom or jib,
(b) the length of a boom or jib,
(c) the position of a load supporting trolley, or
(d) the use or position of outriggers to increase the stability of the structure,
a load chart must be permanently posted on the crane or hoist or must be issued to the crane or hoist operator who must keep it available at all times when operating the crane or hoist.
(4) A load chart under subsection (3) must indicate the rated capacity for the crane or hoist for the working positions and configurations in use and must be in a legible condition.
[Amended by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.6 Load charts

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.7 Boom angle indicator

A crane or hoist with a boom movable in the vertical plane must have a device to indicate the boom angle if the rated capacity is affected by the boom angle, and the device must be readable by the operator at the control station.

14.8 Boom extension and load radius indicators

A crane or hoist must have a means or device to indicate the boom extension or load radius if the rated capacity of the equipment is affected by boom extension or load radius.

14.9 Logging exemption

Specialized equipment designed and used only for logging operations is exempt from the requirements of sections 14.5 to 14.8.

14.10 Reeved-in devices

The rated capacity of a crane or hoist with reeved-in lifting devices must be the net capacity of the equipment, except for mobile cranes.

14.11 Support structure

(1) The rated capacity of a hoist must not exceed the capacity of the structure supporting the hoist.
(2) Selector switches or other effective means must be provided to ensure that the supporting structure is not overloaded by simultaneous use of multiple hoists installed on the supporting structure.
[Amended by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.12 Manual and instructions

(1) In this section:
“engineer’s instructions” mean instructions, approved in writing by a professional engineer, for the assembly, erection, dismantling, maintenance, inspection and operation of the component parts of a crane or hoist and of the assembled crane or hoist.
“manufacturer’s manual” means a manual, prepared by the manufacturer of a crane or hoist, that describes the approved methods of assembly, erection, dismantling, maintenance, inspection and operation of the component parts of the crane or hoist and of the assembled crane or hoist.
(2) A crane or hoist must not be used unless the following is reasonably accessible to the equipment operator and other persons inspecting or maintaining the equipment at the workplace where the crane or hoist is to be used:
(a) the manufacturer’s manual for the crane or hoist;
(b) if the manufacturer’s manual is not available, an engineer’s instructions for the crane or hoist.
(3) A crane or hoist must not be used unless the following is readily available at the workplace where the crane or hoist is to be used:
(a) the portions of the manufacturer’s manual related to the assembly, erection, dismantling, inspection, routine maintenance and safe operation of the crane or hoist;
(b) if the portions of the manufacturer’s manual referred to in paragraph (a) are not available, the portions of an engineer’s instructions related to the assembly, erection, dismantling, inspection, routine maintenance and safe operation of the crane or hoist.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.13 Inspection, maintenance and repair

(1) Each crane and hoist must be inspected and maintained at a frequency and to the extent required to ensure that every component is capable of carrying out its original design function with an adequate margin of safety.
(2) A crane or hoist must not be used until any condition that could endanger workers is remedied.
(3) Any repair to load bearing components of a crane or hoist must be certified by a professional engineer or the original equipment manufacturer as having returned the component to a condition capable of carrying out its original design function with an adequate margin of safety.
(4) Maintenance or repair of a crane or hoist must be done by or under the direct supervision of a qualified person.
[Amended by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.14 Inspection and maintenance records

Records of inspection and maintenance meeting the requirements of Part 4 (General Conditions) must be kept by the equipment operator and other persons inspecting and maintaining the equipment, for
(a) a crane or hoist with a rated capacity of 900 kg (2 000 lbs) or more,
(b) a crane or hoist used to support a worker,
(c) a tower crane,
(d) a mobile crane, boom truck or sign truck,
(e) a side boom tractor or pipe layer,
(f) a construction material hoist,
(g) a chimney hoist,
(g.1) a logging truck trailer reload hoist, and
(h) any other type of hoisting equipment specified by the Board.
[Amended by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.15 Modifications

(1) Each crane or hoist must be erected, dismantled, operated, adjusted, inspected and maintained as specified by the manufacturer’s manual unless otherwise approved by the original equipment manufacturer or a professional engineer.
(2) If a modification that affects the rated capacity or safe operation of a crane or hoist is made to its structure, to one of its mechanical components or to its control system, the crane or hoist must
(a) be assessed,
(b) have its rated capacity adjusted as necessary, and
(c) be certified as safe for use.
(2.1) The assessment, rated capacity adjustment and certification under subsection (2) must be carried out
(a) in accordance with the applicable design or safety standard specified in section 14.2, and
(b) by the original equipment manufacturer or a professional engineer.
(3) Modifications to a crane or hoist must be recorded in the inspection and maintenance records system and the equipment operation and maintenance manuals must be revised as necessary to ensure that adequate and appropriate information is available for safe use and maintenance of the equipment.
[Amended by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.16 Certification required

(1) Subsection (2) applies in respect of a crane or hoist if
(a) the origin or rated capacity of the equipment is not available,
(b) the continued safe use of the equipment cannot be assured because of its condition, age or history, or
(c) modifications referred to in section 14.15 that affect the rated capacity have been made to the crane or hoist.
(2) A person must not use a crane or hoist described in subsection (1) unless a professional engineer has certified the rated capacity of the crane or hoist in accordance with the applicable design or safety standard specified in section 14.2.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.16.1 Certification following misadventure

(1) In this section, “misadventure” means
(a) a contact with a high voltage electrical source,
(b) a shock load,
(c) a loss of a load,
(d) a brake failure,
(e) a collision or upset, or
(f) any other circumstance that may impair the safe operation of the crane or hoist.
(2) If a crane or hoist has been subject to a misadventure, it must be removed from service until a professional engineer has
(a) supervised an inspection of, and supervised any necessary repairs to, the equipment, and
(b) certified the equipment as safe for use at the manufacturer’s rated capacity for the equipment or as provided by section 14.16 if the manufacturer’s rated capacity is not available.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.17 Access and egress

(1) A crane or hoist must have a safe means of access to and egress from
(a) the operator’s position, and
(b) all maintenance and inspection locations on the crane and hoist.
(2) If the normal safe means of egress is not always available to the operator during crane operations, an alternative safe means must be provided for the operator to get from the operating position to a safe area in the event of a power failure or other emergency.
[Amended by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.18 Audible warning

(1) An effective audible warning device must be installed on a crane or hoist, unless the hoisting equipment is operated using a pendant or remote control and the operator walks in a safe position near the load.
(2) The operator of a crane or hoist must sound a warning signal when it is necessary to alert workers to hoisting operations.
[Amended by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.19 Drop stops

(1) A top-running crane, under-running crane, wheel- or rail-mounted gantry crane, tower crane and monorail hoist must have a means to limit the drop of the crane, trolley and bridge truck frames to 25 mm (1 in) if a tire, wheel or axle fails.
(2) Drop stops must be able to support the trolley, bridge and gantry with the crane or hoist loaded to its rated capacity and must be certified to be able to do so by the original equipment manufacturer or a professional engineer.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.20 Rail end stops

(1) End stops must be provided on crane and hoist tracks and rails to prevent the equipment running off the end of the rail or track.
(2) The stops must contact the truck frame or be of a height of at least 1/2 the diameter of the wheels if the wheels contact the stops.

14.21 Fenders

(1) Fenders must be provided on a crane or hoist which operates on rails if there is a possibility of injury to workers from contact with the equipment wheels moving along the rail.
(2) Fenders required by subsection (1) must effectively deflect any object from the path of the wheel.

14.22 Securing pins

A heel-pin, sheave-pin, shackle-pin or similar device must be secured against inadvertent dislodgment, in the manner specified by the equipment manufacturer or by the professional engineer who designed and certified the equipment.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.23 Boom stops

(1) Positive boom stops must be provided on a crane or hoist with a boom that may fall over backward.
(2) A boom hoist disconnect, shutoff or hydraulic relief must be provided on a crane or hoist to automatically stop the boom hoist when the boom reaches the maximum boom operating angle specified by the manufacturer and before the boom stops are contacted.
(3) A jib on a crane or hoist must be restrained from backward overturning.

14.24 Molten metal

A crane or hoist that handles molten metal must have 2 holding brakes on the hoist mechanism.

14.25 Two-block prevention

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 19/2006, effective May 17, 2006.]

14.26 Sheave guards

A running line sheave on a crane or hoist must have a device to retain the rope in the sheave groove.

14.27 Ungrounded supply

An electrically powered crane receiving its source of power from an ungrounded supply must have a ground fault indication system that is monitored on a routine basis.

14.28 Controls

(1) Each control for a crane or hoist must have its function clearly identified and must be maintained in good condition.
(2) Each control for a crane or hoist that causes load movement must return to neutral when pressure from the operator is released.
(3) Subsection (2) does not apply to a crane or hoist manufactured before January 1, 2000 for which continuous pressure controls were not previously required.
(4) Each control for a crane or hoist must be located to allow safe operation of the equipment and if the control is not located in a cab it must be located to provide a safe distance between the operator and the load being handled.
(5) A pendant control for a crane or hoist must be supported independently from its electrical conductors.
(6) A remote control panel for a crane or hoist must be designed to safeguard effectively against the unintended activation of the crane or hoist.
(7) A wireless remote control system for a crane or hoist must incorporate
(a) error checking to prevent the controlled equipment from responding to corrupt data, and
(b) identification coding methods to prevent a transmitter other than the designated transmitter for that crane or hoist from operating the equipment.
(8) A remote control system for a crane or hoist must be designed to ensure the following:
(a) if the power to the remote control system is removed for any reason, all crane or hoist functions stop;
(b) if the control signal for any crane or hoist motion becomes ineffective, the crane or hoist motion stops;
(c) the remote control panel has an operator controlled emergency stop feature that
(i) permits the operator to stop all crane or hoist movement regardless of a malfunction within the remote control system, and
(ii) requires resetting of the emergency stop feature before equipment operation can resume.
(9) A remote control panel for a crane or hoist must be marked to identify the corresponding base control unit to be used with it.
(10) The maximum distance between a remote control panel and the crane or hoist being operated by the remote control system must
(a) not exceed the limit specified by the control system manufacturer, and
(b) be communicated to the operator before the operator uses the crane or hoist.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.29 Operator protection

The operator of a crane or hoist must be protected against hazardous conditions such as falling or flying objects and excessive heat or cold that could adversely affect the health or safety of the operator.

14.30 Cab windows

(1) Cab windows on a mobile crane must be made of safety glazing materials meeting the requirements of ANSI/SAE Z26.1-1990, American National Standard for Safety Glazing Materials for Glazing Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Equipment Operating on Land Highways — Safety Code.
(2) Cab windows on a hoist or crane, other than a mobile crane, must be laminated glass, tempered glass, wired glass or clear polycarbonate plastic.
(3) Operator cab windows on a crane or hoist must
(a) be kept clear
(b) provide an unobstructed field of vision toward the load hook, and
(c) have window wipers, if necessary to maintain a clear view through the window.
[Amended by B.C. Reg. 312/2003, effective October 29, 2003.] [Amended by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.31 Operator’s seat

The operator’s seat on a crane or hoist must be of a design that allows the operator to safely operate the equipment and the seat must be kept in good condition.

14.32 Storage

(1) The operator’s cab of a crane or hoist must be kept free of unnecessary tools, material or equipment.
(2) Adequate storage facilities must be provided if it is necessary to keep tools or equipment in the operator’s cab of a crane or hoist.

14.33 Fire extinguisher

A fire extinguisher having at least a 10 BC rating must be immediately available in the cab of each crane.

Equipment Operation

14.34 Operator qualifications

(1) A crane or hoist must only be operated by a qualified person who has been instructed to operate the equipment.
(2) A person must demonstrate competency, including familiarity with the operating instructions for the crane or hoist and the code of signals for hoisting operations authorized by the Board before operating the equipment.
(3) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 243/2006, effective January 1, 2007.] [Amended by B.C. Reg. 312/2003, effective October 29, 2003.] [Amended by B.C. Reg. 243/2006, effective January 1, 2007.]

14.34.1 Operator certification

On and after July 1, 2007, a mobile crane, tower crane or boom truck must be operated only
(a) by a person with a valid operator’s certificate issued by a person acceptable to the Board, and
(b) in accordance with any conditions stipulated on the certificate.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 243/2006, effective January 1, 2007.]

14.35 Pre-use inspection

(1) Before an operator uses a crane or hoist, the operator must ensure that
(a) the crane or hoist was inspected for that work shift, and
(b) the control and safety devices were tested for that work shift.
(1.1) The inspection and testing in subsection (1) must be carried out in the manner specified
(a) by the manufacturer,
(b) in the applicable design or safety standards set out in section 14.2, and
(c) in this Regulation.
(2) Any defects found during inspection or use of a crane or hoist must be recorded in the inspection and maintenance record system and be reported immediately to the supervisor, who must determine the course of action to be taken.
(3) If a defect affects the safe operation of the crane or hoist, the equipment must not be used until the defect has been remedied.
[Amended by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.36 Load weight

(1) The weight of each load to be hoisted by a crane or hoist must be determined and communicated to the equipment operator and to any person rigging the load.
(2) If the weight of a load to be lifted cannot be accurately determined, the crane or hoist to be used for the lift must have a load weight indicator or an overload prevention system.
(3) Subsections (1) and (2) do not apply to logging equipment that is being used to lift logs or to lift a log trailer.
[Amended by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.37 Calibration

(1) The following devices or systems on a crane or hoist must be calibrated at the intervals specified by the manufacturer and whenever there is an indication the device or system is not functioning correctly:
(a) a load weighing device;
(b) a load moment indicator;
(c) an overload prevention system.
(2) The dates of calibration under subsection (1) must be recorded in the inspection and maintenance records system for the crane or hoist.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.37.1 Operator’s duties

The operator of a crane, hoist or boom truck must have full control of the equipment controls whenever the hoisting equipment is in use, and engage in no other duties while operating the equipment.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 258/2008, effective January 1, 2009.]

14.38 Safe lifting

(1) The rated capacity of a crane or hoist must not be exceeded.
(2) The operator of a crane or hoist must not move a load unless the operator is satisfied that the load can be handled safely.
(3) A load must be secured during a lift to ensure that all or any part of the load cannot be dislodged.
(4) A load line on a crane or hoist must not contact anything other than the load block or hook and the sheaves and hoist drum.
(5) Tag lines or other effective means must be used when necessary to control hazardous movement of a load or to assist with positioning a load.
(6) If a crane or hoist is being operated at the same time and in the same location as other work activity, the employer or the prime contractor must organize and control the work of any persons who are not involved in that operation to ensure that the operation can be carried out safely.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.39 Contact with loads and structures

(1) A load must not contact a structural member of a crane or hoist and a structural member of a crane or hoist must not contact any building, bridge, other crane or any other structure, fixture or improvement.
(2) If contact as described in subsection (1) occurs, a qualified person must inspect the point of contact, and visible damage such as a cracked weld or a bent or dented member must be assessed, repaired as necessary, and the damaged or repaired area certified by a professional engineer as safe for use.
(3) Equipment used for handling logs and specifically designed for the logs to contact the boom or other structural member is exempt from the requirements of subsections (1) and (2), provided workers are kept out of the hazard area created by the loads being handled.
[Amended by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.40 Swing and shear hazards

(1) If a hazard is created by the swing or shearing movement of a load, cab, counterweight or any other part of a crane or hoist, the operator of the crane or hoist must not move the equipment when a person is within range of the swing or shearing movement of the load or equipment.
(2) If a hazard is created by the swing or shearing movement of a load, cab, counterweight or any other part of a crane or hoist, a person must not enter or remain within the range of the swing or shearing movement of the load or equipment.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.41 Position of equipment

(1) Equipment must be positioned so that no moving part of the equipment will come within 60 cm (2 ft) of any obstruction in any area accessible to workers.
(2) If the clearance required by subsection (1) cannot be provided, entry to such areas must be prevented by barriers or other effective means.

14.42 Tandem lift

(1) If a tandem lift is a critical lift or if the lifted load is to be moved laterally, the tandem lift must be carried out under the direction of a qualified supervisor who
(a) is not operating a crane, hoist or other piece of powered lifting equipment, and
(b) is responsible for the safe conduct of the operation.
(2) A written lift plan must be prepared for every tandem lift and must be available at the worksite during the lift.
(3) The lift plan required in subsection (2) must include the following:
(a) rigging details;
(b) wind speed limitations;
(c) maximum hoist line speed;
(d) maximum crane travel speed, if applicable;
(e) load distribution;
(f) the need for and position of signallers.
(4) If a tandem lift involves the use of a tower crane, the lift plan required in subsection (2) must be certified by a professional engineer.
(5) At a pre-job meeting held immediately before commencing hoisting operations for a tandem lift, the lift plan required in subsection (2) must be communicated to all people involved and the supervisor must document the meeting.
(6) The pre-job meeting required under subsection (5) must be repeated whenever there is a change in the people or equipment involved in the tandem lift.
(7) Effective communication must be established and maintained between all people involved in a tandem lift.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.42.1 Critical lift

(1) A written lift plan must be prepared for every critical lift and must be available at the worksite during the lift.
(2) The written lift plan required in subsection (1) must include the following:
(a) rigging details;
(b) wind speed limitations;
(c) maximum hoist line speed;
(d) maximum crane travel speed, if applicable;
(e) load distribution;
(f) the need for and position of signallers.
(3) At a pre-job meeting held immediately before commencing hoisting operations for a critical lift, the lift plan required in subsection (1) must be communicated to all people involved and the supervisor must document the meeting.
(4) The pre-job meeting required under subsection (3) must be repeated whenever there is a change in the people or equipment involved in the critical lift.
(5) Effective communication must be established and maintained between all people involved in a critical lift.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.43 Travelling with a load

(1) When a crane or hoist is travelling with a load, the operator of the crane or hoist must ensure that the load is carried as close to the ground or grade as possible and rigged to control load swing.
(2) When a crane or hoist is travelling with a load, adequate safety measures must be taken to ensure people are not endangered by the movement of the crane, hoist or load.
[Amended by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.44 Loads over work areas

(1) If practicable, work must be arranged to prevent passing a load over any person.
(2) A crane or hoist operator must not pass a load over a person, unless no practicable alternative exists and then only after the person has been warned of the danger by an audible alarm or other effective means.
(3) A person working at a workplace must not stand under or pass beneath a suspended load.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.45 Unattended loads

A load must not be left suspended from or supported by a crane or hoist when an operator is not at the controls.
[Amended by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.46 Vertical load line

The load line above the load hook or the load block of a crane or hoist must be kept vertical when lifting a load in order to prevent side loading of the crane or the load swinging.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.47 Signals

(1) When the operator of a crane or hoist does not have a clear and unobstructed view of the boom, jib, load line, load hook and load throughout the whole range of the hoisting operation, the operator must act only on the directions of a qualified signaller who has a clear view of the things the operator cannot see.
(2) The operator of the crane or hoist must stop the operation of the equipment on receiving a stop signal from any person.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.48 Alternative to hand signals

(1) Two-way radio or other audio or video systems acceptable to the Board must be used if distance, atmospheric conditions or other circumstances make the use of hand signals hazardous or impracticable.
(2) Audio and video communication systems used in a hoisting operation must be designed, installed, operated and maintained according to a standard acceptable to the Board.

14.49 Dedicated radio system

(1) A two-way radio system used for communications between the operator of a tower crane or a self erecting tower crane and the riggers and signallers working with that operator, must operate on a frequency and at a transmitter power assigned and coordinated by the Board or by a person acceptable to the Board.
(2) Multi-channel radios are not permitted for use to direct crane or hoist movement.
(3) Only the operator of the crane and the riggers and signallers working with the operator may have the capability to transmit on the radio frequency assigned under subsection (1).
[Amended by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.49.1 Communication between equipment operators

If, during the operation of a crane or hoist, another piece of equipment is operating in the vicinity and has the reach to interfere with the movement of the crane or hoist, or the load being handled,
(a) each operator must have effective voice communication with every other operator, and
(b) written procedures must be developed and implemented to ensure coordination of the operation of the equipment to prevent any physical contact.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.50 Unhooking loads

A load on a crane or hoist load hook must be safely landed and supported, before being unhooked.

14.51 Riding hook or load

A worker must not ride on a load, sling, hook or any other rigging equipment.

14.52 Induced voltage

(1) Before a crane or hoist is operated near a source such as a radio transmitter or energized high voltage electrical equipment which may induce an electric charge which could pose a hazard to workers, the following precautions must be implemented:
(a) the crane or hoist must be effectively grounded;
(b) any induced electric charge on the load must be dissipated by applying grounding cables or by other effective means before workers contact the load;
(c) flammable materials must be removed from the immediate work area.
(2) Subsection (1)(a) and (b) does not apply if work is being performed on a power system in accordance with the requirements of Part 19 (Electrical Safety).

14.52.1 Work near high voltage

A crane or hoist must be operated in a manner that prevents any part of the crane or hoist, load line, rigging or load from coming within the minimum distance of energized high voltage electrical conductors or equipment as specified in Part 19.
[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 320/2007, effective February 1, 2008.]

14.53 High voltage electrical conductors

Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, effective October 29, 2003.]

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose

The permission to reproduce this material is provided by the Queens Printer for Manitoba. The Queens Printer does not warrant the accuracy or currency of the reproduction of this information.

Workplace Safety and Health Regulation
Regulation 217/2006
Registered October 31, 2006
“self-elevating work platform” means a work platform that can be self-elevated,
and includes a boom-type elevating work platform and one that rolls or is
self-propelled
“elevated work platform” means
(a) a self-elevating work platform; and
(b) a suspended work platform; and includes a work platform that is mounted to an aerial device or a forklift or is suspended from a crane. (plateforme de travail)

PART 23

CRANES AND HOISTS

Application

23.1 This Part applies to every workplace where a crane or hoist is used.

Safe work procedures
23.2(1) An employer must
(a) develop and implement safe work procedures respecting the use of cranes and hoists;
(b) train workers in the safe work procedures; and
(c) ensure that workers comply with the safe work procedures.
23.2(2) The safe work procedures must deal with the installation, removal or replacement of the mast or boom section of a crane or hoist and all related parts.

OPERATOR REQUIREMENTS

23.3(1) An employer must ensure that only a person who is authorized to practise the trade of crane and hoist operator under the Trade of Crane and
Hoisting Equipment Operator Regulation, Manitoba Regulation 91/2000. is allowed to operate
(a) a mobile crane with a rated load of 7,300 kg or more;
(b) a boom truck hoist with a rated load of 7,300 kg or more; or
(c) a tower crane.
23.3(2) An employer must ensure that the operator of a crane or hoist does not leave the controls of the crane or hoist unattended while a load is being hoisted.

APPLICABLE STANDARDS

23.4 An employer and a supplier must ensure that
(a) a commercially manufactured crane or hoist is designed, constructed, erected, used, maintained, examined, inspected, operated and repaired in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications and the applicable requirements of the following
standards:
(i) CSA Standard W178.1-02, Certification of Welding Inspection Organizations,
(ii) CSA Standard W178.2-01, Certification of Welding Inspectors,
(iii) CAN/CSA Standard-B167-96 (R2002), Safety Standard for Maintenance and
Inspection of Overhead Cranes, Gantry Cranes, Monorails, Hoists, and Trolleys,
(iv) CSA Standard C22.2 NO. 33-M1984 (R2004), Construction and Test of Electric
Cranes and Hoists,
(v) CAN/CSA Standard-Z150-98 (R2004), Safety Code on Mobile Cranes,
(vi) CAN/CSA Standard-Z185-M87 (R2004), Safety Code for Personnel Hoists,
(vii) CAN/CSA Standard-Z248-2004, Code for Tower Cranes,
(viii) CAN/CSA Standard-Z256-M87 (R2006), Safety Code for Material Hoists; or
(b) a crane or hoist that is not commercially manufactured is
(i) designed by a professional engineer in accordance with the applicable requirements of the standards set out in clause (a),
(ii) certified by a professional engineer, and
(iii) constructed, erected, used, maintained, examined, inspected, operated and repaired in accordance with the professional engineer’s requirements.

REPAIRS AND MODIFICATIONS

23.5 An employer must ensure that structural repairs or modifications to the components of a crane or hoist are
(a) made only under the direction and control of a professional engineer; and
(b) certified by the professional engineer that the workmanship and quality of the materials used has restored the components to not less than their original capacity.

MAINTENANCE AND INSPECTION SCHEDULE

23.6 An employer and a supplier must, while a crane or hoist is in their possession,
(a) develop and implement a maintenance and inspection schedule for a crane or hoist in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or the specifications of the applicable standard under clause 23.4(a) where no manufacturer’s
specifications exist; and
(b) maintain the crane or hoist in a safe operating condition.

DUTY TO INSPECT

23.7(1) An employer must ensure that a crane or hoist is inspected by the operator before the start of each work shift in order to detect any defect, malfunction or hazardous condition.
23.7(2) A supplier must ensure that a crane or hoist is inspected for any defect, malfunction or hazardous condition before the crane or hoist is supplied to any person.

LOGBOOK FOR CRANES

23.8(1) When a crane with a rated load capacity of one tonne or more is in the possession of an employer or a supplier, the employer or supplier must provide and
maintain a logbook for the crane that records the following information:
(a) the date and time when any work was performed on the crane;
(b) the length of time in hoisting service;
(c) all defects or deficiencies and when they were detected;
(d) all inspections performed on the crane, including examinations, checks and tests;
(e) a record of any certification of repairs or modifications under section 23.5;
(f) a description of the work performed by the crane each day;
(g) in the case of a tower crane,
(i) whether or not the weight testing device was lifted for each working day, before the work of lifting loads began, and
(ii) a record of certification under section 23.25;
(h) any matter or incident that may affect the safe operation of the crane.
23.8(2) An employer and supplier must ensure that every entry in the logbook is signed by the person performing the work.
23.8(3) When a supplier provides a crane to a person, the supplier must ensure that the most current version of the logbook accompanies the crane.
23.8(4) When ownership of a crane is transferred, the person transferring ownership must ensure that all logbooks for the crane are transferred to the new owner.

Rated load
23.9(1) An employer and a supplier must ensure that a crane or hoist has a plate or weatherproof label permanently secured to it that legibly shows
(a) in the case of a commercially manufactured crane or hoist,
(i) the manufacturer’s name,
(ii) the model, serial number and the year of manufacture or shipment date, and
(iii) the manufacturer’s rated load; and
(b) in the case of a crane or hoist that is not commercially manufactured, the rated load certified by a professional engineer.
23.9(2) An employer and a supplier must ensure that a mobile crane or boom truck is equipped at all times with a load chart showing the rated load at all permitted boom angles and boom radiuses.
23.9(3) An employer must ensure that a tower crane has a load chart conspicuously and permanently secured to the cab that shows the manufacturer’s rated loads at various radiuses of a single line, a two-part line and a four-part line separately.
23.9(4) An employer must ensure that the structural components of an A-frame, gin pole or guyed derrick are designed to withstand at least four times the rated load of the equipment.

Weight load information
23.10 An employer must ensure that the operator of a crane or hoist is provided with the information necessary to enable the operator to determine readily and accurately the weight of any load that the operator is required or permitted to raise.

Warning devices
23.11(1) When the movement of a crane or hoist may create a risk of safety or health of a person, an employer must ensure that the crane or hoist is equipped with an effective warning device that
(a) is readily accessible to the operator at the operator’s working position; and
(b) is designed to warn a worker of the impending movement of the crane or hoist.
23.11(2) If an employer uses an auditory warning device, the device must have a distinct sound that is distinguishable from all other sounds at the workplace.

Boom and jib stops
23.12 When the design or operation of a crane or other hoist may result in the boom or jib falling backwards because of its return movement, an employer and a supplier must ensure that the crane or hoist is equipped with
(a) a boom stop and a limit device; and
(b) where a jib is attached, a jib stop and a limit device.

SIGNAL PERSON COMMUNICATION

23.13(1) Unless the operator of a crane or hoist has an unobstructed and clear view of its operation, an employer must designate a signal person to give the operator signals to provide for the safe operation of the crane or hoist.
23.13(2) Except for an emergency stop signal, an operator must not follow any signal given by any worker other than the designated signal person.

Load movement
23.14 When there is a risk to the safety or health of a person because of the movement of a load by a crane or hoist, an employer must ensure that the movement of the load is controlled by a tag line or clamp device.

OUTRIGGER OR STABILIZER PROCEDURES

23.15 When a crane or hoist is equipped with outriggers or stabilizers, an employer must ensure that (a) the outriggers or stabilizers
(i) are used in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, and
(ii) are set on a solid footing or pad; and
(b) the area around the outriggers or stabilizers is kept clear of obstructions.

Riding prohibited
23.16 An employer must ensure that no person rides on a load, hook, rigging or bucket attached to a crane or hoist.

BARRICADING BASE

23.17 When there a risk of a worker being trapped or crushed by any moving part of the crane or hoist when it swings, an employer must ensure that a barricade is erected around the base of the crane or hoist.

VEHICULAR AND PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC SAFETY

23.18 When hoisting takes place adjacent to or in the vicinity of a pedestrian walkway, street, highway or other public thoroughfare, an employer must provide signs, barricades and properly identified flagpersons or other measures in accordance with Part 20 (Vehicular and Pedestrian Traffic).

TEMPERATURE AND WEATHER CONDITIONS

23.19 An employer must ensure that a crane or hoist does not operate
(a) when the temperature is at or below the temperature for the safe loading conditions
recommended in the manufacturer’s specifications;
(b) when the wind velocity exceeds the limit recommended in the manufacturer’s specifications for safe operation; and
(c) when weather conditions or other circumstances are such that the operation of the crane or hoist creates a risk to the safety or health of any person.

PLAN OF PROCEDURES FOR MULTIPLE CRANE LIFT

23.20 An employer must ensure that
(a) a plan of procedures for the operator of a lift of one load involving two or more cranes is prepared by a professional engineer; and
(b) every worker involved in the lift is trained in the plan of procedures.

Operator protection
23.21 An employer must ensure that the operator of a crane or hoist is protected from any falling material or equipment.

TOWER CRANES

Tower crane requirements

23.22(1) An employer must ensure that the foundation for a tower crane is designed and certified by a professional engineer.

23.22(2) An employer must ensure that a tower crane is equipped with the following devices located at the operator’s work position in clear view of the
operator:
(a) a permanent load gauge that indicates the weight of the load being hoisted and immediately displays that weight to the operator;
(b) a wind velocity gauge to measure the wind velocity at or above the height of the jib.
23.22(3) An employer must ensure that a tower crane is equipped with the following safety devices:
(a) an overload device consisting of a hoist overload switch that automatically restricts the lift of the load;
(b) a travel limit device consisting of a movement overload switch that automatically restricts the radius within which the load can travel;
(c) a height limit switch that automatically prevents the cable from being over wound on the drum;
(d) a trolley travel limit device consisting of a trolley-in and a trolley-out limit switch that prevents the trolley from running to the end of its track and falling off.
23.22(4) An employer must ensure that the safety devices set out in subsection (3) are adjusted and set in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications and have their limit switches sealed.

MEANS OF VERBAL COMMUNICATION

23.23 An employer must
(a) provide, install and maintain a direct means of verbal communication between a tower crane operator and each hook-up, rigger or signal person; and
(b) provide a direct means of verbal communication between the operators of two or more tower cranes with overlapping radiuses.

MULTIPLE CRANES

23.24 When two or more tower cranes are erected in such a manner that the radiuses of operations overlap, an employer must ensure that the operators operate the cranes so that there are no collisions between the cranes or their loads.

Structural testing and examination
23.25(1) An employer must ensure that all structural and rigging components of a tower crane undergo non-destructive testing under the direction and control of a professional engineer in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications as close as reasonably
practicable to the construction project site (a) before the crane is used for the first time in Manitoba; and
(b) if the crane is moved from project to project, before it is used after the move.
23.25(2) If a tower crane is in operation on a construction project for more than one year from the date on which the crane starts operating, an employer must ensure its structural components are examined under the direction and control of a professional engineer in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications.
23.25(3) An employer must ensure that the results of the testing or examination required under subsections (1) and (2) are certified by a professional engineer in a report that clearly identifies the crane and the components to which the information relates.

OVERHEAD CRANES

Positive lockout system

23.26 An employer must ensure that an overhead electric crane is provided with a positive lockout system so that power is shut off when a worker is maintaining
or servicing the crane.

Rail stops

23.27 An employer must ensure that a craneway at a workplace is equipped with adequate rail stops to prevent the overhead electric crane from contacting any
obstruction or overrunning the end of the rails.

Upper limit devices

23.28 An employer must ensure that
(a) an overhead crane has a hoist equipped with a working upper limit device; and
(b) the upper-limit switch is not used as a braking device.

Safety latch

23.29 An employer must ensure that a hoisting hook is equipped with a safety latch or similar security device.

MATERIAL HOISTS

Inspection and testing

23.30(1) Subject to subsection (2), an employer must ensure that a material hoist is tested before being used.
23.30(2) A material hoist does not have to be tested if it has been tested within seven days before its last use.

Barricading base

23.31(1) An employer must provide a fence or other suitable barricade at the base of a material hoist to prevent unauthorized entry of any person.
23.31(2) A worker must not use the base of a material hoist to access an adjacent structure.

ROOFER’S HOISTS

Employer obligations

23.32(1) An employer must ensure that the following requirements are complied with when a roofer’s hoist is used:
(a) bolts or pins used to interconnect component parts of a roofer’s hoist are equipped with safety pins that prevent them from being dislodged;
(b) drivers, pulleys and belts are effectively guarded;
(c) a roofer’s hoist is only used for vertical lifting;
(d) a roofer’s hoist is in a level position.
23.32(2) An employer must ensure that a roofer’s hoist has counterweights that are
(a) designed as a component part of the hoist to remain securely attached to the hoist until all hoisting is completed; and
(b) heavy enough to counterbalance four times the maximum weight of the load being lifted.
23.32(3) An employer must ensure that roofing material, bagged material or any other construction material is not used as counterweight on a roofer’s hoist.

VEHICLE LIFTS

Vehicle lift requirements

23.38(1) An employer must ensure that a vehicle lift meets the requirements of the following standards:
(a) ANSI Standard ANSI/ALI ALCTV-1998, Automotive Lifts — Safety Requirements for
Construction, Testing and Validation;
(b) ANSI Standard ANSI/ALI ALOIM-2000, Automotive Lifts — Safety Requirements for
Operation, Inspection and Maintenance;
(c) ANSI Standard ANSI/ALI ALIS-2001, Standard for Automotive Lifts — Safety Requirements for Installation and Service.
23.38(2) An employer must ensure that a pneumatic or hydraulic vehicle lift has controls operated by constant manual pressure.
23.38(3) An employer must ensure that the operator of a vehicle lift
(a) remains at the controls while the vehicle lift is in motion; and
(b) does not block the controls during raising and lowering.
23.38(4) An employer must ensure that no worker is under a suspended load unless the load is supported by
(a) a vehicle lift designed for that purpose; or
(b) rated stands or blocks, other than jacks, that are designed, constructed and maintained to support the load and placed on firm foundations.

PART 28
SCAFFOLDS AND OTHER
ELEVATED WORK PLATFORMS

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

Application
28.1(1) This Part applies to every workplace where work takes place using a scaffold or elevated work platform.
28.1(2) Except for work of short duration that can be done safely from a ladder, an employer must ensure that a worker engaged in work that cannot be done from
the ground or other safe elevation is provided with a scaffold or an elevated work platform.

Safe work procedures

28.2(1) When a scaffold or an elevated work platform is required to be provided at a workplace, the employer must
(a) develop and implement safe work procedures for using the scaffold or elevated work platform provided;
(b) train workers who work on scaffolds and elevated platforms in those safe work procedures; and
(c) ensure that the workers comply with those safe work procedures.
28.2(2) An employer must ensure that the safe work procedures developed in subsection (1) include emergency response and rescue procedures appropriate
to the risks associated with the failure of a scaffold or other elevated work platform.

Commercially manufactured scaffolds and elevated work platforms
28.3(1) An employer must ensure that a commercially manufactured scaffold or elevated work platform is installed, used, maintained and dismantled in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications. But the employer may alter those specifications if the
alteration is certified by a professional engineer.
28.3(2) When a commercially manufactured scaffold or elevated work platform is used at a workplace, the employer must ensure that a copy of the manufacturer’s specifications, and any alterations certified by a professional engineer, are readily
accessible at that workplace.

WHEN CRANE USED TO SUSPEND A PERSONNEL BASKET OR CAGE

General restriction re use of crane

28.33(1) An employer may only permit a crane to be used to hoist a personnel basket or cage where it is not reasonably practicable to carry out the required work by use of a scaffold or other type of elevated work platform that does not include the use of a crane.
28.33(2) The prior notification requirements of section 28.22 apply whenever a crane is used to hoist a personnel basket or cage, regardless of the height of the hoisting operation.

Basket or cage requirements when crane used
28.34(1) Despite section 28.21, when a crane is used to hoist a personnel basket or cage, an employer must ensure that the personnel basket or cage
(a) is designed by a professional engineer in accordance with CAN/CSA Z150-98 (R2004), Safety Code on Mobile Cranes, and is constructed in accordance with the design specifications certified by the engineer;
(b) is equipped with
(i) anchor points located above the load hook of the personnel basket or cage for the attachment of a worker’s fall arrest system,
(ii) a guardrail that meets the requirements of Part 14 (Fall Protection), and
(iii) a skid resistant deck;
(c) has more than one means of suspension or support, and is designed, constructed and maintained so that the failure of one of the means will not cause the collapse of all or part of it;
(d) is designed and constructed so that it remains horizontal at all times;
(e) is suspended from, or supported by, a direct attachment to the boom of the crane; and
(f) has the following legibly and permanently marked in a conspicuous place on it:
(i) the maximum number of workers who may occupy the personnel basket or cage,
(ii) its weight,
(iii) the crane type for which it has been designed,
(iv) any other information necessary for safe operation of the personnel basket or cage.

Inspection and certification

28.34(2) An employer must ensure that the professional engineer who designed the personnel basket or cage
(a) inspects it before its first use; and
(b) certifies that it has been manufactured in accordance with his or her design specifications.

Crane requirements and documentation

28.35(1) An employer must ensure that a crane used to hoist a personnel basket or cage
(a) is equipped with
(i) fail-safe mechanisms that prevent the boom and the personnel basket or cage from free falling in the event of a power or system failure or the inadvertent release of any operating controls, and
(ii) an automatic limit switch that prevents the personnel basket or cage and load from reaching beyond the highest permissible position specified by the crane manufacturer;
(b) has, on its hoist line, hooks that are equipped with self-closing safety latches at the point where the personnel basket or cage is suspended;
(c) is not used to hoist material when the personnel basket or cage is being used to support a worker;
(d) is not loaded in excess of 25% of its rated load; and
(e) has a clearly visible and legible load chart, revised in accordance with clause (d) by a professional engineer, that is affixed in a conspicuous place on the
crane.

Operating requirements
28.36 When a crane is used to hoist a personnel basket or cage, an employer must ensure that
(a) emergency rescue procedures are developed and implemented for the hoisting operation;
(b) the workers involved in the hoisting operation are informed of those emergency rescue procedures;
(c) there is an adequate means of communication between the worker or workers in the personnel basket or cage and the crane operator; and
(d) every worker in the personnel basket or cage
(i) wears a full body harness that is connected independently to a fixed anchor point located above the crane’s load hook, and
(ii) uses the harness in accordance with Part 14 (Fall Protection).

AERIAL DEVICES AND
SELF-ELEVATING WORK PLATFORMS

Standards re self-elevating work platforms and aerial devices
28.37(1) An employer must ensure that a self-elevating work platform or aerial device used at a workplace is designed, and constructed, installed, maintained, used and dismantled, in accordance with
(a) CAN/CSA Standard-B354.1-04, Portable Elevating Work Platforms;
(b) CAN/CSA Standard-B354.2-01 (R2006), Self-propelled Elevating Work Platforms;
(c) CAN/CSA Standard-B354.4-02, Self-propelled Boom-Supported Elevating Work Platforms; or
(d) CSA Standard C225-00 (R2005), Vehicle-Mounted Aerial Devices.
28.37(2) An employer must ensure that
(a) a self-elevating work platform or aerial device constructed at a workplace is designed and certified by a professional engineer; and
(b) the professional engineer’s specifications for its construction, installation, maintenance, use and removal are in accordance with the standards under subsection (1).
28.37(3) Subject to section 28.3, an employer must ensure that the manufacturer’s specifications for a commercially manufactured self-elevating work platform or aerial device used at a workplace are in accordance with the standards under subsection (1).
28.37(4) An employer must ensure that structural repairs and modifications to the components of a self-elevating work platform or aerial device are
(a) made only under the direction and control of a professional engineer; and
(b) certified by the professional engineer that the workmanship and quality of the materials used has restored the components to not less than their original capacity.

Guarding
28.38 An employer must ensure that each self-elevating work platform and aerial device used at a workplace is equipped with
(a) suitable guards to prevent a worker from contacting the moving parts and machinery, including protection from shearing hazards created by the movement of the platform; and
(b) guardrails and toe-boards on all open sides or an enclosure that is at least 900 mm in height.

Fall protection
28.39(1) An employer must ensure that a worker using a self-elevating work platform or aerial device
(a) uses a fall arrest system that meets the requirements of Part 14 (Fall Protection) when
(i) the platform or aerial device is being elevated, lowered or moved, or
(ii) the worker steps beyond the guardrail; and
(b) has the lanyard of the fall arrest system attached in accordance with the specifications of
(i) the manufacturer of the work platform or aerial device, or
(ii) a professional engineer.
28.39(2) An employer must ensure that a lifeline is of an appropriate length to prevent a worker from being ejected from the self-elevating work platform or aerial device if it collapses.
28.39(3) Despite subsection (1), a fall arrest system is not required for a worker who remains within the confines of the guardrail of a scissor lift while the lift is being raised or lowered.

Maintenance, records and manuals
28.40(1) An employer and a supplier must, while a self-elevating work platform or aerial device is in their possession,
(a) maintain it so that it is safe for use;
(b) keep a permanent record of all inspections, tests, repairs, modifications and maintenance performed on it; and
(c) ensure that its operator’s manual is kept with it.
28.40(2) A record under subsection (1)(b) must include the name and signature of the person who maintains it and the person who performs an inspection, test, repair or modification on it.

Signs
28.41 An employer and a supplier of a self-elevating work platform or aerial device must ensure that the platform or device has signs that are clearly visible and legible to an operator at its controls indicating the following:
(a) the identity of the supplier;
(b) the name and number of the standard to which the platform or aerial device was designed;
(c) its rated load;
(d) all limiting operating conditions, including the use of outriggers, stabilizers and extendable axles;
(e) the specific firm level surface conditions required for use of the platform or aerial device in the elevated position;
(f) any warnings specified by the manufacturer;
(g) except for a boom-type elevating work platform, the direction of machine movement for each operating control.

Climbing prohibited
28.42 An employer must ensure that no worker climbs on the extension mechanism or the boom of a self-elevating work platform or aerial device.

Use of the self-elevating work platform or aerial device
28.43 An employer must ensure that a self-elevating work platform or aerial device
(a) is used only in accordance with the specifications of its manufacturer or those of the professional engineer who designed it;
(b) is not loaded in excess of its rated load, or loaded or used in a manner that affects its stability or endangers a worker;
(c) is used only on a firm level surface that complies with the conditions required for its use;
(d) is not moved unless all workers on it are protected from falling; and
(e) when elevated, is accessed by a worker only if procedures for doing so have been established in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or those of the professional engineer who designed it, and then only in accordance with those procedures.

Inspection
28.44 An employer must ensure that a competent person inspects a self-elevating work platform or aerial device before it is first used and daily when it is in use.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following is QUEEN™ PRINTER FOR NEW BRUNSWICK. All rights reserved.

NEW BRUNSWICK REGULATION 91-191 under the OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT (O.C. 91-1035)

Mobile Cranes
213(1) An employer shall ensure that a mobile crane
(a) has a cab, screen, canopy guard or other adequate protection for the operator of the crane if the operator may be exposed to the hazard of falling material,
(b) is equipped with load limit brakes capable of effectively braking the load being lifted,
(b.1 has a two-blocking damage prevention mechanism or an audible device that warns the operator of an impending two-block condition,
(c) has safety devices and limit switches installed and used as specified by the manufacturer, and
(d) has a boom angle indicator clearly visible to the operator.

213(1.1) Paragraph (1)(a) does not apply to mobile cranes with controls that are externally mounted outside the cab.

213(2) Where a mobile crane is being operated in an area where the swing clearance of any obstruction is less than 600 mm, an employer shall ensure that barriers are installed to prevent a person from entering the area.
97-121; 2001-33

213.1 An employer shall ensure that a load chart from the manufacturer of a mobile crane is kept with the crane and is accessible to the operator when operating the crane. 2001-33

213.11 An employer shall ensure that a mobile crane
(a) is used only for the purposes for which it is designed and equipped,
(b) is operated by a competent person,
(c) is equipped with adequate chassis brakes,
(d)Â is equipped with a manually operated horn,
(e) has a rear-view mirror or other means of ensuring that the equipment can be safely manoeuvred back and forth,
(f) when wheel mounted, is equipped with an audible back-up alarm that operates automatically when the equipment is in reverse and that is clearly audible above the background noise,
(g) when crawler mounted, is equipped with an audible motion detector that operates automatically when the crane is in motion and that is clearly audible above the background noise,
h) is equipped with adequate headlights and tail lights when used after dark or in dimly lit areas,
(i) has gears and moving parts adequately guarded,
(j) has controls that cannot be operated from outside the cab unless the controls are designed to be operated from outside the cab,
(k) has any load on it adequately secured, and
(l) is provided with a three point contact to access the operator’s cab.
2001-33

213.2(1) An operator of a mobile crane shall
(a) ensure that a person does not ride on any part of the crane not designed to carry passengers,
(b) not set a crane in motion until all air and hydraulic pressures are fully built up to specified operating pressures,
(c) follow a safe refueling procedure,
(d) not store containers of gasoline, diesel oil or other flammable substances in the cab,
(e) not carry loose articles in the cab that would pose a hazard to the safe operation of the crane, and
(f) keep the crane in gear when going downhill.

213.2(2) An operator of a mobile crane shall, when leaving the crane unattended,
(a) secure it against movement,
(b) set the brake,
(c) not leave a load suspended,
(d) engage the swing lock and swing brake,
(e) leave the controls in neutral,
(f) disengage the master clutch,
(g) stop the engine, and
(h) remove the key.
2001-33

213.21(1) An employer shall ensure that a mobile crane is inspected every twelve months by an engineer or a competent person who is supervised by an engineer.

213.21(2) An engineer referred to in subsection (1) shall certify in writing that the inspection complies with the requirements of subsection (4) and that the crane is in safe working order.

213.21(3) A certification under subsection (2) shall provide details on the conditions under which the mobile crane was inspected.

213.21(4) An engineer referred to in subsection (1) shall ensure that the inspection under subsection (1), including a visual weld inspection, is conducted in accordance with the requirements of clause 4.3.5.1 of CSA standard Z150-98, “Safety Code on Mobile Cranes”.

213.21(5) An employer may accept a certification from an engineer in another jurisdiction with respect to a mobile crane if the crane has been inspected and certified in that jurisdiction in accordance with subsection (2) and the certification would otherwise be valid under this section.

213.21(6) An employer shall ensure that a copy of the certification provided under this section is accessible to the operator when in the cab and is available to an officer on request.

213.21(7) An employer shall ensure that a mobile crane that
(a) does not have a certification that meets the requirements of subsection (2), is inspected and certified under this section no later than twelve months after the commencement of this provision, and
(b) has a certification that meets the requirements of subsection (2), is inspected and certified no later than twelve months after the date of the certification.
2001-33

213.3 Section 213.1 and subsections 213.21(1), (5), (6) and (7) apply with the necessary modifications to a person who owns a mobile crane.
2001-33

213.31(1) An operator of a mobile crane shall visually inspect the mobile crane daily before commencing work with the crane.

213.31(2) If more than one operator uses a mobile crane in the course of a day or if the crane is used on more than one shift, each operator shall visually inspect the crane before commencing work with the crane.

213.31(3) A visual inspection under this section shall be of all components that have a direct bearing on the safe operation of the crane and whose status may change from day to day with use and shall include, but is not limited to,
(a) where practicable, all rope reeving, including load lines, jib suspension, boom hoist and mid-point suspension, for compliance with the crane and wire rope manufacturer’s specifications,
(b) all control mechanisms, before operation, for maladjustments or malfunctions interfering with proper operation,
(c) all control mechanisms for excessive wear of components and contamination by lubricants or other foreign matter,
(d) all safety devices for malfunction,
(e) all air, hydraulic, lubricating and cooling systems for deterioration or leakage,
(f) electrical apparatus for malfunction, signs of excessive deterioration, dirt, icing or moisture accumulation,
(g) all exposed hydraulic hoses, particularly those that flex during the operation of the crane,
(h) hooks and latches, for deformation, chemical and heat damage, cracks and wear,
(i) the hydraulic system for proper oil level,
(j) swivels for freedom of rotation,
(k) clutches, brakes and attachments for malfunctions,
(l) where practicable, outriggers for their ability to retract and extend and to bear the load,
(m) outrigger boxes for structural damage,
(n) tires for recommended pressure,
(o) where practicable, all running ropes for any appreciable loss of original strength as indicated by general corrosion, broken or cut strands and visible broken wiresand for distortion of the rope, such as kinking, crushing, unstranding, birdcaging, main-strand displacement or core protrusion,
(p) where practicable, rotation-resistant ropes and boom-hoist ropes, to ascertain any damage or deterioration, and
(q) where practicable, all points of rapid deterioration, such as flange points, crossover points and repetitive pickup points on drums.

213.31(4) An operator who conducts a visual inspection under this section shall forthwith record the results of the inspection in an operator’s log kept for the crane, and shall also record any deficiencies in the crane log.

213.31(5) An employer shall ensure that an operator’s log is prepared and maintained for each mobile crane so as to provide each operator with the results of previous visual inspections of the crane by an operator, and shall ensure that the log is kept in the cab of the mobile crane.
2001-33

213.4(1) An employer shall ensure that a crane log is prepared and maintained for each mobile crane to provide the owner, employer and operator with a complete machine history for the crane.

213.4(2) A crane log referred to in subsection (1)
(a) shall be designed to provide the information in a logical and chronological sequence,
(b) shall show in detail all inspections, tests, maintenance, repairs, revisions and modifications carried out on the crane,
(c) shall show the date on which work was performed on the crane, and by whom, together with the total hours of service recorded on the machine up to that time,
(d) shall have all entries dated and signed by the person carrying out the work on the crane,
(e) shall record in detail all incidents or misadventures, all damage sustained, and subsequent repairs, and
(f) shall include details of boom sections designed and manufactured by someone other than the crane’s original equipment manufacturer.
2001-33

213.41(1) Where an employee is performing maintenance or repairs on a mobile crane that is raised from the ground by means of jacks or hoists, other than outriggers or stabilizers, an employer shall ensure that the mobile crane is adequately blocked.

213.41(2) An employer shall ensure that an employee does not work under or go under the raised parts of a mobile crane unless the parts are adequately blocked, or the crane is raised by its outriggers or stabilizers, and no employee shall work under or go under such raised parts unless the parts are adequately blocked, or the crane is raised by means of its outriggers or stabilizers.
2001-33

213.5(1) No person shall alter a mobile crane in such a way as to render ineffective a safety device or limit switch installed on the crane.

213.5(2) Notwithstanding subsection (1), a person may alter a mobile crane to render ineffective a safety device or limit switch installed on the crane if the alteration is certified in writing by the manufacturer of the device or switch, or an engineer, as affording protection equal to or greater than the protection afforded by the safety device or limit switch.

213.5(3) An operator shall not use, and an employer shall not permit to be used, a mobile crane if the crane has been altered so as to render ineffective a safety device or limit switch installed on the crane.

213.5(4) Subsection (3) does not apply where the alteration has been certified in writing by the manufacturer of the safety device or limit switch, or an engineer, as affording protection equal to or greater than the protection provided by the safety device or limit switch.
2001-33

214(1) An employer shall ensure that a rubber tired mobile crane is equipped with stabilizers and that the operator of the crane has sufficient training and information to be able to determine when stabilizers should be used.

214(2) Subsection (1) does not apply if the mobile crane is designed to be used without stabilizers.

214(3) When operating a rubber tired mobile crane without using stabilizers, an operator shall work in accordance with the load chart designed for operating without stabilizers.

214(4) When operating a rubber tired mobile crane using stabilizers, an operator shall ensure that the stabilizers are extended as required by the manufacturer and placed on pads of sufficient size to prevent movement.
2001-33

215 Where a mobile crane is moving from one location to another under its own power, an employer shall
(a) ensure that precautions are taken to prevent the boom from swinging, and
(b) where the operator has restricted vision, have a signaller designated under section 212 guide the movement of the crane.
2001-33

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

Copyright © 2009: Queens Printer, St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador

Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, 2009 under the Occupational Health and Safety Act (O.C. 2009-233)

PART XI

SCAFFOLDS, STAGES AND WORK PLATFORMS

Work platforms supported by a crane or hoist
191. A work platform suspended from a crane or hoist, or attached to a crane boom shall be approved and certified by a professional engineer.

Crane capacity
192. The weight of a work platform suspended from a crane or hoist or attached to a crane boom, and its rigging, plus the rated capacity, shall not exceed 25% of the crane’s rated capacity at the working radius.

Eccentric loading
193. Where a work platform attached to a crane boom causes eccentric loading on the boom, the rated capacity of the crane shall be reduced and shall be determined and certified by the crane manufacturer or a professional engineer.

Rigging
194. Rigging used to suspend a work platform from a crane or hoist shall have a safety factor of at least 10, and shall be used exclusively for suspending the work platform.

Two block prevention
195. Where a crane or hoist is being used to hoist personnel with a load line, the line shall have a device to prevent two-blocking.

Powered booms and winches
196. (1) A crane used to suspend a work platform shall have a powered boom or a fixed boom.
(2) A hoist used to raise or lower a work platform suspended from a crane shall be capable of lowering under power.
(3) A free running boom or hoisting winch, controlled only by brakes, shall not be used to raise or lower a work platform.
(4) Hoisting and lowering speed of a crane or hoist shall be kept as slow as practicable while supporting a work platform.

Fall protection – suspended work platforms

197. (1) An occupant of a work platform suspended from a crane or hoist shall use a personal fall arrest system with a shock absorbing lanyard secured to a designated anchorage point on the platform or above the load hook.
(2) Where a work platform suspended by a crane or hoist is occupied by a worker with a personal fall arrest system attached to the platform, the platform shall have a safety strap that prevents the platform from falling more than 15 centimetres where the platform becomes dislodged from the hook.
(3) Each occupant of a work platform attached to a crane boom shall use a personal fall arrest system secured to a designated anchorage point on the boom.

Articulating booms prohibited
198. A work platform shall not be
(a) suspended from an articulating boom crane; or
(b) attached to an articulating boom crane unless the installation is approved by the crane manufacturer.

Travelling restriction
199. Travelling with a worker in a work platform supported by a crane or hoist is not permitted except where the platform is supported by a rail-mounted crane.

Communications
200. The operator of a crane or hoist used to suspend a work platform shall have an effective means of constant communication with a person on the platform.

Definitions -elevating work platforms
201. For the purpose of this section and sections 202 to 217,
(a) “aerial device” means a vehicle-mounted device having a boom which may be telescoping or articulating, or both, with a work platform on the boom, which is used to position personnel;
(b) “aerial ladder” means a vehicle-mounted aerial device with a single or multiple-section ladder with or without a platform at the top;
(c) “boom-supported elevating work platform” means an elevating work platform or aerial device which has its platform supported by an elevating device that elevates and rotates relative to the machine base;
(d) “elevating work platform” means a work platform or aerial device which self-elevates to overhead work locations and includes other similar devices not covered elsewhere in these regulations; and
(e) “self-propelled” means the capability of an elevating work platform to be power propelled with the primary controls on the work platform.

Standards

202. (1) A self-propelled work platform comprising a boom-supported elevating platform, which telescopes, articulates, rotates or extends beyond the base dimensions, and is not mounted on a separate self-propelled vehicle shall meet the requirements of
(a) CSA Standard CAN/CSA-B354.4 “Self-propelled Boom-Supported Elevating Work Platforms”;
(b) ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.5 “Boom-Supported Elevating Work Platforms”; or
(c) other standard acceptable to the minister.
(2) A self-propelled integral chassis elevating work platform having a platform that cannot be positioned laterally completely beyond the base and for which primary functions are controlled from the platform shall meet the requirements of
(a) CSA Standard CAN/CSA-B354.2 “Self-Propelled Elevating Work Platforms”;
(b) ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.6 “American National Standard for Self- Propelled Elevating Work Platforms”; or
(c) other standard acceptable to the minister.
(3) A manually propelled, integral chassis elevating work platform having a platform that cannot be positioned laterally completely beyond the base, which may be adjusted by manual or powered means and which shall not be occupied when moved horizontally, shall meet the requirements of
(a) CSA Standard CAN/CSA-B354.1 “Portable Elevating Work Platforms”;
(b) ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.3 “American National Standard for Manually Propelled Elevating Aerial Platforms”; or
(c) other standard acceptable to the minister.
(4) A telescopic aerial device, aerial ladder, articulating aerial device, vertical t ower, material-lifting aerial device or a combination of these, when vehicle-mounted, whether powered or manually operated, shall meet the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA-C225 “Vehicle-Mounted Aerial Devices” or other standard acceptable to the minister.
(5) An elevating work platform of a type other than that referred to in subsections (1) to (4) shall meet a standard acceptable to the minister.

Operating and maintenance manuals
203. (1) The equipment manufacturer’s
(a) operation manual; and
(b) maintenance manual, containing maintenance instructions and replacement part information for each elevating work platform in use at the workplace shall be available at the workplace.
(2) Where either of the manuals referred to in subsection (1) is not available, the equipment shall not be used until the manual is obtained, or until written instructions for the safe operation and maintenance of the equipment are supplied by a professional engineer.

Inspection and maintenance records
204. (1) Records of inspection, maintenance, repair and modification shall be kept for an elevating work platform by the equipment operator and a person inspecting and maintaining the equipment.
(2) Where the inspection and maintenance records required under subsection (1) are not available, an elevating work platform shall be inspected and certified by a professional engineer before use, and an inspection and maintenance recording system shall be established as required by subsection (1).

Shift inspection
205. An elevating work platform shall be inspected by the operator before use on each shift and a condition that could endanger workers shall be remedied before the platform may be used.

Annual inspection and certification
206.
(1) An elevating work platform shall be inspected, maintained, repaired and modified in accordance with
(a) the manufacturer’s instructions;
(b) the relevant CSA Standard as specified in section 202;
(c) the direction of a professional engineer; or
(d) another standard acceptable to the minister.
(2) An insulated aerial device shall be dielectrically tested at least annually in accordance with CSA Standard CAN/CSA-C225 “Vehicle Mounted Aerial Devices” or other standard acceptable to the minister and the insulating capability of the aerial device shall be certified by the testing agency.

Fall protection – elevating work platform
207.
(1) A person on an elevating work platform shall wear a personal fall arrest system secured to an anchorage point that is approved by the manufacturer or professional engineer.
(2) A worker on an aerial ladder shall be continuously protected by means of a personal fall arrest system as required by Part X or shall maintain 3 points of contact with the ladder at all times.

Safe access
208. Safe means shall be provided to get on and off the platform of an elevating work platform.

Rated capacity
209. The rated capacity of an elevating work platform
(a) shall be marked on the platform; and
(b) shall not be exceeded.

Outriggers
210.
(1) An outrigger on an elevating work platform shall be used in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.
(2) Where an elevating work platform has outriggers, notices indicating the circumstances specified by the manufacturer for which the outriggers are to be used shall be clearly displayed at the operating controls for the platform.

Controls
211. (1) Each control on an elevating work platform shall be clearly identified to indicate its function.
(2) Controls on an elevating work platform shall be ‘hold-to-run’ (continuous pressure) type that return to the neutral or stop position when released.
(3) Controls on an elevating work platform shall be protected against inadvertent operation.
(4) Each set of operating controls of an elevating work platform shall be provided with an emergency stop device.
(5) An emergency stop device referred to in subsection (4) shall be
(a) within easy reach of the operator;
(b) clearly labelled ‘STOP’; and
(c) red in colour.
(6) An elevating work platform shall have a clearly marked overriding lowering control to enable a worker at the lower controls to stop and lower the platform in the event of an emergency.

Immobilization of vehicles
212. (1) The carrier vehicle of an elevating work platform shall be secured against inadvertent movement before a worker occupies the platform.
(2) Where a manufacturer permits an elevating work platform to be elevated on sloping ground, the vehicle’s wheels shall be secured according to the manufacturer’s instructions and where no instructions have been provided, the wheels shall be chocked.

Shear hazard
213. An elevating work platform lifting mechanism which creates a shear hazard to workers shall be adequately guarded or identified with signs, decals or similar markings warning of the hazard.

Warning devices
214. An elevating work platform, other than a vehicle-mounted aerial device which complies with the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA-C225 “Vehicle Mounted Aerial Device”, shall have a warning system consisting of an intermittent horn and flashing light which is automatically activated during motion of the work platform.

Transporting workers
215. A worker may not be transported on an elevated work platform unless the transport is in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

Lift truck platform
216. A work platform mounted on the forks of a lift truck shall be designed by an engineer or conform to a standard acceptable to the minister and
(a) securely attached to the lifting carriage or forks;
(b) provided with perimeter guardrails meeting the requirements of sections 28 and 30;
(c) equipped with guarding to prevent occupants from contacting a hazardous part of the lifting machinery; and
(d) clearly marked with the rated load of the platform.

Fall protection – lift truck
217. Where a worker is elevated on a work platform supported by a lift truck,
(a) the lift truck operator shall remain at the controls of the lift truck;
(b) the lift truck mast shall be kept vertical;
(c) the lift truck shall not be moved except for minor adjustments necessary to facilitate positioning of the platform; and
(d) a platform occupant shall use a personal fall protection system as required by Part X.

Swing stages – definitions
218. For the purpose of this section and sections 219 to 242
(a) “bridging” means using a deck or planking to span a gap between two independent work platforms;
(b) “rated load” means the maximum load, designated by the manufacturer, that may be placed safely on a swing stage, and includes the weight of the workers, their tools and equipment, material to be transported and allowances for loads including trailing electric power supply cords, compressed air supply lines, abrasive blasting feed supply lines, or other loads, but does not include the weight of the work platform or its supporting rigging;
(c) “safe lower landing” means an area onto which a swing stage or other suspended platform system can be lowered that is capable of safely supporting the weight of the swing stage plus the rated load of the system and which can be accessed safely by workers;
(d) “static load” means
(i) for suspension by 2 or more lines, the rated load of the swing stage plus half the weight of the stage including the working platform, hangers or stirrups, hoisting units and suspension lines, and
(ii) for suspension by a single line, the rated load plus the weight of the stage;
(e) “suspension height” means the distance from the upper attachment points of the suspension line to the safe lower landing for the swing stage; and
(f) “swing stage” means a temporary suspended work platform used to support workers, tools, equipment and materials, which is raised and lowered by manually controlled hoisting equipment.

Rated load
219. The rated load
(a) shall be permanently marked upon a swing stage and clearly readable by workers on the stage; and
(b) shall not be exceeded.

Weight identification
220. A swing stage platform and a hoist unit shall have its weight clearly marked on it.

Prior permission
221. A swing stage shall not be used without the prior permission of the minister when
(a) there are 2 or more work platforms at different levels on one swing stage assembly;
(b) one swing stage is used above or below a portion of another swing stage;
(c) there is bridging between swing stages;
(d) a work platform exceeds 10 metres in length; or
(e) the suspension height exceeds 90 metres.

Attachment points
222. A swing stage shall be suspended from parapet clamps, cornice hooks, thrust-out beams or other solid anchorages having a working load limit that is at a minimum equivalent to that of the suspension system for the swing stage.

Securing suspension lines
223. A suspension line for a swing stage shall be secured at the upper end using a safety hook, shackle or other method acceptable to the minister.

Hook and clamp working load limit
224. The working load limit of a cornice hook or parapet clamp shall be determined by the manufacturer or professional engineer and be clearly marked on the hook or clamp.

Hook and clamp engagement
225. (1) A cornice hook or parapet clamp shall be installed to engage structurally sound portions of a building or structure having adequate strength for the purpose.
(2) Where the structural adequacy of the building or structure at the point of attachment of a cornice hook or parapet clamp is not known, a professional engineer shall determine and certify the attachment points.

Tiebacks
226. (1) A cornice hook, parapet clamp or thrust-out beam shall be secured by a tieback to a solid anchorage on the building or structure or to another parapet clamp secured on the far side of the structure.
(2) The securing, rigging and anchorage required under subsection (1) shall have an ultimate strength of at least 22.2 kilonewtons.
(3) A tieback referred to in subsection (1) shall, to the extent practicable, be rigged at a right angle to the building face.

Thrust-out beams
227. (1) A thrust-out beam used to support a swing stage shall provide a minimum safety factor of 4, based on the ratio of the ultimate load carrying capacity of the thrust-out beam to the static load.
(2) The rated load for the allowable thrust-out beam projections shall be determined by the beam manufacturer or a professional engineer and clearly marked on the beam.

Counterbalance of thrust-out beams
228. (1) A thrust-out beam used for supporting a swing stage shall be counterbalanced to support a load of at least 4 times the static load.
(2) A counterweight used to counterbalance a thrust-out beam shall be
(a) clearly marked to indicate its weight;
(b) of solid material not subject to loss of weight through attrition; and
(c) secured to the thrust-out beam.

Hook closures
229. (1) A hook used in a swing stage suspension system shall be moused or have a safety latch.
(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to the connection between a cornice hook
and the structure.

Protection against damage
230. (1) Where a suspension line, tieback, lifeline or other part of the rigging for a swing stage comes into contact with a rough or sharp edge, the line shall be protected from damage.
(2) Padding shall be used to minimize loss of rope strength where a line supporting a swing stage makes a sharp bend over an edge.

Fibre rope suspension
231. Fibre rope used to suspend a swing stage or similar equipment shall
(a) provide a safety factor of at least 10, based on the ratio of the rope manufacturer’s rated breaking strength for the rope to the load on the rope due to the static load;
(b) be made of synthetic fibre having a breaking strength of at least 22 kilonewtons;
(c) be reeved through a block and tackle system comprising at least one double upper and one single lower block, for each hanger;
(d) have the hauling line secured to prevent free running of the line;
(e) be free of knots or splices except for terminal eye-splices; and
(f) not be used where exposed to adverse effects of chemicals, unless the rope is made of materials inert to the chemicals.

Wire rope suspension
232. Wire rope used to suspend a swing stage or similar equipment shall
(a) provide a safety factor of at least 10, based on the ratio of the manufacturer’s rated breaking strength of the wire rope on the load on the rope due to the static load;
(b) be a type recommended for that use by the rope manufacturer, and recommended for use by the hoist manufacturer; and
(c) be continuous and unspliced, except for terminal eye-splices or other types of terminal connections required under Part XV, but fold back eyes secured by only a pressed metal sleeve shall only be used where the sleeve manufacturer approves the use of the sleeve for this application, and the eyes are made in accordance with the manufacturer’s instruction and proof tested.

Length of suspension ropes
233. (1) Suspension ropes for a swing stage shall be of sufficient length to permit the work platform to be lowered to a safe lower landing.
(2) Where a swing stage or platform is suspended over water, or where it is impractical to lower the work platform to a safe lower landing, lower limit travel devices, compatible for safe use with the hoist system, shall be used to ensure the working platform shall not be lowered beyond the safe lower limit of travel.

Hoisting devices
234. Winches and other mechanical devices used for hoisting and lowering swing stages or similar equipment shall have automatically operated locking mechanisms that prevent slipping of the suspension ropes.

Hangers or stirrups
235. A hanger or stirrup used for supporting a swing stage shall
(a) be made of mild steel or other metal having similar properties, but shall not be made of wire rope;
(b) have a minimum safety factor of 10 based on the ratio of the ultimate load carrying capacity of the stirrup or hanger to the static load; and
(c) be effectively fastened to the swing stage platform to prevent inadvertent separation.

Platform width
236. A swing stage work platform shall be at least 50 centimetres wide.

Safety factor
237. A swing stage work platform shall have a safety factor of at least 4, based on the ratio of the ultimate load carrying capacity of the work platform to the rated load.

Rated load
238. The rated load for a swing stage platform shall be established by the platform manufacturer or a professional engineer.

Guardrails
239. (1) A swing stage shall have guardrails with
(a) a top rail of 1.07 metres high on all sides of the platform and an intermediate rail, located midway between the top rail and the platform floor, or top of the toeboard, where applicable; or
(b) other type of guarding providing equivalent protection and satisfactory to the minister.
(2) Guardrails on a swing stage shall be adequately supported and shall be able to withstand an ultimate load of 900N concentrated at any point on the top rail.

Toeboards and netting
240. A swing stage on which loose material or equipment is carried shall have toeboards at least 10 centimetres high along all sides of the work platform, and netting with a mesh opening of less than 2.5 centimetres extending from the toeboard to the top rail on the backside.

Equipment inspection
241. (1) A swing stage and associated equipment shall be thoroughly inspected before use on each shift and defective equipment shall not be used.
(2) A swing stage that has been subjected to a sudden drop, contact with exposed energized electrical equipment or conductors, or shows signs of a structural failure shall be removed from service until certified safe for use
by the manufacturer or a professional engineer.

Fall protection – swing stage
242. A worker on a swing stage which is 3 metres or more above grade or a safe lower landing, or where a fall from a lesser height may involve an unusual risk of injury, shall use a personal fall arrest system meeting the requirements of Part X secured to an anchor independent of the swing stage system.

Boatswain’s chairs
243. (1) A boatswain’s chair shall meet the requirements of the applicable CSA standard or be acceptable to a professional engineer.
(2) A boatswain’s chair shall provide stable and adequate support for the user.
(3) A boatswain’s chair shall be suspended from a parapet clamp, cornice hook, thrust-out beam or other solid anchorage having a working load limit at least equivalent to that of the suspension system for the boatswain’s chair.
(4) A counter weight shall be
(a) positively secured to thrust outs; and
(b) tied back to an anchorage that is capable of withstanding 22 kilonewtons static load where a counter weight configuration has not been designed into the building.
(5) Where a boatswain’s chair is supported by block and tackle
(a) the rope shall be synthetic fibre rope with a breaking strength of at least 22 kilonewtons;
(b) the rope shall be reeved through not less than one single lower block and one double upper block and secured to prevent the line from free running; and
(c) block hooks shall be moused, or otherwise secured against dislodgement.
(6) Fibre rope used to suspend a boatswain’s chair other than with a block and tackle system shall be synthetic fibre rope having a breaking strength of at least 27 kilonewtons and of a type compatible for use with the rigging hardware in the suspension system.
(7) Wire rope used to suspend a boatswain’s chair shall be a type recommended for that use by the rope manufacturer or a professional engineer and suitable for the hoist being used.
(8) A worker in a boatswain’s chair which is 3 metres or more above grade or a safe lower landing, or where a fall from a lesser height may involve an unusual risk of injury, shall use a personal fall arrest system meeting the requirements of Part X independent of the boatswain’s chair system.
(9) A boatswain’s chair shall not be used where the suspension height exceeds 92 metres without the prior permission of the minister.
(10) A thorough inspection shall be made of a boatswain’s chair and associated equipment before use each day and defective equipment shall not be used.

Definitions
244. For the purpose of sections 245 to 249
(a) “permanent powered platform” means a powered platform which is a permanent installation on a particular building or structure;
(b) “portable powered platform” means a powered platform any part of which is not permanently installed or attached to a particular building or structure and which may be removed and relocated elsewhere where required; and
(c) “powered platform” means a suspended swing stage which is raised or lowered by other than manual means.

Permanent powered platforms
245. A permanent powered platform shall meet the requirements of CSA Standard CAN3-Z271 “Safety Code for Suspended Powered Platforms” or other standard acceptable to the minister and shall be of a design and construction certified by a professional engineer.

Portable powered platforms
246. (1) A portable powered platform shall meet
(a) the requirements for a swing stage regarding suspension, construction and use of fall protection; and
(b) the requirements of CSA Standard CAN3-Z271 “Safety Code for Suspended Powered Platforms” for hoist units and controls.
(2) Where a portable powered platform is raised and lowered by 2 separately controlled hoists operated by a single occupant on the platform, the controls shall be located so that they can be used simultaneously by the occupant.

Fall protection – powered platform
247. (1) Except as permitted by subsection (2), where a powered platform is 3 metres or more above a grade or a safe lower landing or where a fall from a lesser height may involve an unusual risk of injury, a worker on the platform shall use a personal fall arrest system meeting the requirements of Part X secured to an anchor independent of the powered platform system.
(2) A worker supported on a permanent powered platform having 4 or more suspension ropes shall be attached to a secure anchorage on the platform by means of a personal fall arrest system and the installation shall meet the requirements of CSA Standard CAN3-Z271 “Safety Code for Suspended Powered Platforms” or other standard acceptable to the minister.

Maintenance and operating records
248. Records of inspection and maintenance shall be maintained for 5 years by the operator and another person inspecting and maintaining a permanent powered platform.

Window cleaning
249. A window cleaning operation shall be conducted in accordance with the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA-Z91 “Health and Safety Code for Suspended Equipment Operations” or other standard that the minister may consider appropriate.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following is copyright © 2009, Province of Nova Scotia

Occupational Health and Safety Act S.N.S. 1996, c. 7

Part 7 – Hoists and Mobile Equipment

General provisions
55 An employer shall ensure that a hoist, industrial lift truck or powered mobile equipment is erected, installed, assembled, started, operated, used, handled, stored, stopped, inspected, serviced, tested, cleaned, adjusted, maintained, repaired, modified and dismantled in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, or the specifications certified by an engineer.
Section 55 amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
56 An employer shall ensure that a hoist, industrial lift truck or powered mobile equipment
(a) is operated by a designated competent person;
(b) has gears and moving parts securely guarded by adequate means where necessary to prevent a hazard to a person in the workplace; and
(c) has any load on it adequately secured where necessary to prevent a hazard to a person in the workplace; and
(d) is provided with safe means of access and exit from the operator’s position and any passengers position.

Signaller
57 (1) An employer shall designate one or more competent persons as a signaller to direct the safe movement of a load, hoist, industrial lift truck or powered mobile equipment where the operator of that hoist, industrial lift truck or powered mobile equipment
(a) does not have an adequate view of the load;
(b) does not have a clear view of the route the load is to take;
(c) is not able to see clearly around the equipment when moving and has not taken measures sufficient to ensure that no person is exposed to a hazard as a result of the movement of equipment;
(d) is not able to see clearly where the hoist or its load may encroach the minimum distance specified in Section 126 or a hoist is positioned closer than the length of its boom to an overhead energized power line or power line equipment; or
(e) is causing the equipment to move under its own power from one location to another and the situation creates a hazard in the workplace.
Subsection 57(1) amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(2) A signaller shall
(a) be readily identifiable to the operator;
(b) direct the movement of a load or equipment by a well understood distinctive code of hand signals or another effective communication system;
(c) warn the operator each time
(i) any part of the hoist or its load may encroach on the minimum distance specified in Section 126, or
(ii) the hoist is positioned closer than the length of its boom
from an overhead energized power line or power line equipment; and
(d) obtain the assistance of another signaller if all or part of the view of the load or route is obstructed from both the signaller and the operator.
(3) An operator of a hoist, industrial lift truck or powered mobile equipment in a situation referred to in subsection (1) shall move a load only on a signal from a signaller.

Safety equipment and precautions
58 An employer shall ensure that a mobile crane, industrial lift truck or powered mobile equipment is equipped with
(a) an audible back-up alarm that
(i) operates automatically when the vehicle is in reverse gear, and
(ii) is clearly audible above the background noise at the workplace,
or that another means of protection or warning that provides an equivalent level of safety is used;
(b) a manually operated horn, unless such a horn was not installed at the time of manufacture;
(c) adequate front and rear lights when the equipment is used after dark or in dimly lit areas;
(d) an adequate braking system; and
(e) a screen, shield, grill, deflector, guard or other adequate protection for the operator, where the operator may be exposed to the hazard of flying or intruding objects.
Subsection 58(1) renumbered Section 58 and amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
59 An employer shall ensure that a hoist or powered mobile equipment that is equipped with outriggers or stabilizers is operated with the outriggers or stabilizers engaged, unless the manufacturer’s specifications permit otherwise.
Section 59 replaced: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
60 An employer shall ensure that a hoist, industrial lift truck or powered mobile equipment is not altered in such a way as to render ineffective a safety device or control, except where the change has been certified in writing by the manufacturer or an engineer to afford protection equal to or greater than the protection afforded by the original safety device or control.
61 An employer shall take adequate precautions to ensure that a hoist, industrial lift truck or powered mobile equipment does not tip or roll over.

Overhead protection
62 (1) Where an employee who is an operator of powered mobile equipment is exposed to a hazard from falling objects, an employer shall ensure that the powered mobile equipment is equipped with a protective structure adequate for the conditions in which the equipment is being used and that meets the requirements of the applicable SAE standard listed below or that is certified by an engineer or the manufacturer to provide equivalent or better protection:
(a) SAE J167 APR92, “Overhead Protection for Agricultural Tractors – Test
Procedures and Performance Requirements”;
(b) International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 3449:1992, “Earth-moving machinery — Falling-object protective structures — Laboratory tests and performance requirements”;
Clause 62(1)(b) replaced: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(c) SAE J397 OCT95, “Deflection Limiting Volume – Protective Structures Laboratory Evaluation”;
(d) SAE J1042 JUN93, “Operator Protection for General-Purpose Industrial Machines”; or
(e) SAE J1084 APR80, “Operator Protective Structure Performance Criteria for Certain Forestry Equipment”.
Clause 62(1)(e) replaced: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
Clause 62(1)(f) repealed: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
Subsection 62(1) amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(2) An employer shall ensure that modifications, alterations or repairs made to a falling objects protective structure that affect the structural integrity of the structure meet the requirements of this Section and that the designing agency, the installing agency or an engineer certifies that modifications, alterations or repairs meet the requirements of this Section.
(3) An employer shall ensure that welding on a falling objects protective structure that affects the structural integrity of the structure is performed by a designated competent person.

Rollover protection
63 (1) An employer shall ensure that, where reasonably practicable, powered mobile equipment and industrial lift trucks manufactured on or after January 1, 1974, are equipped with rollover protective structures that meet the minimum safety requirements of the following standards:
(a) CSA standard B352.0-95, “Rollover Protective Structures (ROPS) for Agricultural, Construction, Earthmoving, Forestry, Industrial and Mining Machines – Part 1: General Requirements”, or is certified by an engineer or the manufacturer to provide equivalent or better protection;
(b) where applicable, CSA standard B352.1-95 (R1999), “Rollover Protective Structures (ROPS) for Agricultural, Construction, Earthmoving, Forestry, Industrial, and Mining Machines – Part 2: Testing Requirements for ROPS on Agricultural Tractors”, or is certified by an engineer or the manufacturer to provide equivalent or better protection; and
(c) where applicable, CSA standard B352.2-95 (R1999), “Rollover Protective Structures (ROPS) for Agricultural, Construction, Earthmoving, Forestry, Industrial, and Mining Machines – Part 3: Testing Requirements for ROPS on Construction, Earthmoving, Forestry, Industrial, and Mining Machines”, or is certified by an engineer or the manufacturer to provide equivalent or better protection.
Subsection 63(1) replaced: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(2) Where reasonably practicable, an employer shall ensure that powered mobile equipment or industrial lift trucks manufactured before January 1, 1974 are equipped with rollover protective structures that meet the requirements of subsection (1) or
(a) a rollover protective structure and supporting attachments are designed, fabricated and installed in such a manner to support not less than twice the weight of the equipment, based on the ultimate strength of the material and integrated loading of the supporting members with the resultant load applied at the point of impact;
(b) there is a vertical clearance of 1320 mm between the deck and the rollover protective structure at the access openings; and
(c) the rollover protective structure and supporting attachments referred to in clause (a) are certified as meeting the requirements of clause (a) by the manufacturer of the rollover protective structure, the installing agency or an engineer.
Subsection 63(2) amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(3) An employer shall ensure that modifications, alterations or repairs made to a rollover protective structure that affect the structural integrity of the structure meet the requirements of this Section and that the designing agency, the installing agency or an engineer certifies that modifications, alterations or repairs meet the requirements of this Section.
[Note: Section 63 and amendments to it made by O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000 effective November 1, 2000.] 64 An employer shall ensure that welding on a rollover protective structure that affects the structural integrity of the structure is performed by a designated competent person.
[Note: Section 64 effective November 1, 2000.] 65 (1) An employer shall ensure that powered mobile equipment and industrial lift trucks that have been fitted with rollover protective structures have
(a) seat belts for the operator and passengers that comply with or exceed the applicable SAE standard listed below:
(i) SAE J386 NOV97, “Operator Restraint System for Off-Road Work Machines”,
Subclause 65(1)(a)(i) replaced: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(ii) SAE J800 JUN94, “Motor Vehicle Seat Belt Assembly Installation”; or
(b) where the wearing of seat belts is not reasonably practicable, restraining devices such as shoulder belts, bars, gates, screens or other similar devices designed to prevent the operator and passengers from being thrown outside the rollover protective structure.
Subsection 65(1) amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(2) An operator of and passengers on powered mobile equipment or an industrial lift truck shall use the seat belts or restraining devices referred to in subsection (1) while the equipment is in motion.
Subsection 65(2) amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
[Note: Section 65 and amendments to it made by O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000 effective November 1, 2000.]

Glass
66 An employer shall ensure that glazing or rigid plastic materials used as part of an enclosure for a cab, canopy or rollover protective structure on a hoist, industrial lift truck or powered mobile equipment is adequate in the circumstances where it is used, and is immediately replaced if it presents a hazard, including permanent interference with visibility.

Precautionary arrangements
67 (1) Unless otherwise authorized by an enactment, no person shall operate an industrial lift truck or powered mobile equipment with passengers on the truck or equipment, unless the manufacturer’s specifications for the truck or equipment state that the truck or equipment is designed to accommodate them safely.
Subsection 67(1) amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(2) An employer shall ensure that powered mobile equipment and industrial lift trucks that have an internal combustion engine are provided with fire protection equipment adequate for the hazards of the equipment or vehicles.
Subsection 67(2) replaced: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(3) An employer shall
(a) ensure that mirrors or other devices are installed and maintained at blind intersections where there may be a danger of a collision between an industrial lift truck or powered mobile equipment and another object or a person; or
(b) adopt a written procedure that provides an equivalent level of safety.

Visibility
68 Where work with a hoist, industrial lift truck or powered mobile equipment is carried out in an area where dust may create a hazard to a person in the workplace because of poor visibility, an employer shall take steps to reduce the amount of dust in the air so as to protect a person from the risk of injury.

Operating precautions
69 An operator of a mobile crane, where applicable, an industrial lift truck or powered mobile equipment shall
(a) not set equipment in motion until all air and hydraulic pressures are fully built up at specified operating pressures;
(b) when leaving the equipment unattended
(i) park it on level ground, if reasonably practicable,
(ii) set the parking brake,
(iii) lower the blades, bucket or other attachment or safely block the attachment,
(iv) where applicable, disengage the master clutch, and
(v) shut off the engine or take other precautions to ensure the equipment is not inadvertently set in motion;
(c) not carry containers of gasoline, diesel oil or other flammable substances, classified as Class B substances under the Hazardous Products Act (Canada), in the part of the equipment where a person rides; and
(d) ensure that there are no loose articles that may present a hazard in the part of the equipment where a person rides.
Section 69 amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
70 (1) An employer shall ensure that a hoist, industrial lift truck or powered mobile equipment that has wire ropes, drums and sheaves is inspected
(a) visually on a daily basis by the operator of the equipment; and
(b) visually and manually by a designated competent person on a weekly basis.
(2) An employer shall ensure that, where a person works under a hoist, industrial lift truck, or powered mobile equipment that is raised from the ground, the equipment is provided with blocking or other adequate means of support in case the means of lifting the equipment fails.
71 Where repair or maintenance work is carried out at the point of articulation on an articulated truck, front end loader or other articulated equipment, an employer shall ensure that lock bars or an equivalent measure is used to prevent movement of either end of the truck, loader or equipment.
with planks and a fall arrest system shall be provided in accordance with these regulations.

Hoists
72 (1) Subject to subsection (2), an employer shall ensure that a hoist is designed, installed, erected, examined, inspected, tested, operated and maintained by a competent person, in accordance with the applicable CSA or ANSI standard listed below:
(a) CSA standard B167-96, “Safety Standard for Maintenance and Inspection of Overhead Cranes, Gantry Cranes, Monorails, Hoists, and Trolleys”;
(b) CSA standard C22.2 No. 33-M1984 (R1992), “Construction and Test of Electric Cranes and Hoists”;
Clause 72(1)(b) replaced: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(c) CSA standard Z150-1998, “Safety Code for Mobile Cranes”;
(d) CSA Standard Z248-1975, “Code for Tower Cranes”;
(e) ANSI standard ANSI/ALI ALCTV-1998, “Automotive Lifts – Safety Requirements for Construction, Testing and Validation”;
Clause 72(1)(e) replaced: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(f) ANSI standard ANSI/ALI ALOIM-1994, “American National Standard for Automotive Lifts – Safety Requirements for Operation, Inspection and Maintenance”.
Section 72 renumbered subsection 72(1) and amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(2) Despite subsection (1), a “crane inspector” described in the standard referred to in clause (1)(a) shall not require 10 000 hours of experience.
Subsection 72(2) added: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
[Note: Section 72 and amendments to it made by O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000 effective November 1, 2000.] 73 (1) In this Section and Section 74, “rated load” means the maximum load that a hoist is designed to lift or the revised maximum load that a hoist can lift in accordance with subsection (9) or (10).
Subsection 73(1) replaced: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(2) Subject to subsections (3), (9) and (10), an employer shall obtain a statement of the rated load of a hoist from the manufacturer of the hoist.
Subsection 73(2) amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(3) Where the statement referred to in subsection (2) cannot be obtained, an employer shall obtain a statement of the rated load of the hoist from an engineer.
Subsection 73(3) amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(4) In addition to any inspection under Section 72, an employer shall ensure that
(a) a competent person inspects a hoist at least once a year;
(b) where the hoist is a mobile or overhead crane with a capacity of greater than 5 t, a certificate from an engineer is obtained on an annual basis with respect to the mobile or overhead crane; or
(c) where the hoist is a tower crane, a certificate from an engineer is obtained with respect to the tower crane
(i) prior to the tower crane being put into service and each time it is erected, and
(ii) once during each year of operation.
(5) An inspection or a certification required under subsection (4) shall confirm that a hoist has a rated load identified and that no component will fail within its rated load.
Subsection 73(5) amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(6) The competent person inspecting a hoist under clause (4)(a) and an engineer certifying a mobile or overhead crane under clause (4)(b) or a tower crane under clause (4)(c) shall perform the appropriate tests to ensure that the hoist is capable of lifting its rated load, including, where appropriate, a running test, load test, deflection test and brake test.
Subsection 73(6) amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(7) An employer shall post a legible statement of the rated load referred to in subsection (2) or (3) on a hoist so that the operator of the hoist is able to see it when operating the hoist.
Subsection 73(7) amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(8) The employer shall ensure that an operator of a hoist has sufficient information to determine the load that the hoist is capable of hoisting safely under any operating condition.
(9) Where part of a hoist is modified, extended, altered or repaired so as to potentially affect the rated load of the hoist, an employer shall obtain a revised statement of the rated load of the hoist from the manufacturer, if the manufacturer performed the work, otherwise from an engineer, and post it on the hoist in the manner described in subsection (7).
Subsection 73(9) amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(10) Where an employer believes that a reduction in the rated load is warranted or has been informed by the manufacturer of the hoist or an engineer that a reduction in the rated load is warranted, the employer shall
(a) obtain a revised statement of the rated load of the hoist from the manufacturer or an engineer;
(b) reduce the rated load of the hoist to a revised level certified as adequate by the manufacturer or an engineer; and
(c) remove the statement of rated load from the hoist and post the revised statement of rated load on the hoist in the manner described in subsection (7).
Subsection 73(10) amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(11) Where the employer has obtained a revised statement of the rated load of a hoist pursuant to subsections (9) or (10), the employer shall provide sufficient information to the operator of the hoist to enable the operator to determine the load that the hoist is capable of hoisting safely under any operating condition.
Subsection 73(11) amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
[Note: Section 73 and amendments to it made by O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000 effective November 1, 2000.] 74 (1) Subject to subsection (2), the operator of a hoist shall not subject the hoist to a load in excess of its rated load.
Subsection 74(1) amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(2) At the time that tests are performed for purposes of an inspection or certification, the person inspecting the hoist may cause the hoist to be subject to a load in excess of its rated load, but not in excess of the safety factor identified by
(a) the applicable standard in Section 72 or the manufacturer’s specifications; or
(b) where there is no standard or manufacturer’s specifications, the specifications certified by an engineer.
Subsection 74(2) amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
75 (1) In addition to any inspections referred to in Sections 72 or 73, an employer shall ensure that a competent person visually inspects a hoist, including any safety devices, for defects that may affect the structural integrity of the hoist
(a) before it is put into service initially or after 1 month or more of disuse;
(b) once during every month of operation; and
(c) after any incident or repair, including contact with an energized utility line or equipment that may have damaged some part of the hoist or endangered any person.
(2) Where an inspection identifies a defect in a hoist that affects the safe operation of the hoist, an employer shall remove the hoist from service and repair it before it is put back into service.
(3) An employer shall maintain a record of
(a) each inspection of a hoist required under Sections 72 and 73, and subsection (1); and
Clause 75(3)(a) amended: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
(b) each repair potentially affecting the structural integrity of a component of a hoist that supports a load,
including the date, time, nature and results of the inspection or repair and the name of the person who performed the inspection or repair to a hoist.
(4) Where limit switches and safety devices are installed on a hoist by the manufacturer, an employer shall ensure that these switches and devices are maintained in adequate condition.
[Note: Section 75 and amendments to it made by O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000 effective November 1, 2000.] 76 An operator of a hoist shall
(a) visually inspect the hoist on a daily basis before use to verify that it is in adequate working order;
(b) not carry a load over any person, except where
(i) it is not reasonably practicable to divert the traffic route of persons or use another lifting route, and
(ii) the employer has developed a written work procedure to provide adequate warning or information about the hazard to people at or near the work place;
(c) not leave a suspended load unattended; and
(d) where an uncontrolled swing or uncontrolled rotation of a load may endanger the health or safety of a person, ensure that a guide rope or other adequate means is used to stabilize the load

Mobile cranes
77 An employer shall ensure that a mobile crane has
(a) installed and maintained in an adequate condition a device that warns the mobile crane operator when continued movement may cause the load attached to a mobile crane to strike the upper sheaves of the mobile crane; and
(b) if equipped with a boom that is not articulating, a boom angle indicator.
Section 77 replaced: O.I.C. 2000-130, N.S. Reg. 52/2000.
78 An employer shall ensure that barriers or equivalent means are used to prevent a person from entering within the swing radius of the body of the mobile crane where a mobile crane is being operated in an area where the clearance between any obstruction and the swing radius of the body of the mobile crane creates a hazard.
79 While a mobile crane is moving from one location to another under its own power, no operator shall permit the boom to swing in an uncontrolled manner.

Power operated elevating work platforms
36 (1) A power operated elevating work platform shall
(a) be equipped with positive pressure controls for the positioning of the work platform;
(b) be equipped with a power elevating mechanism equipped with positive drives for both raising and lowering the work platform;
(c) be equipped with an interlock device that limits lateral movement when the height of the work platform exceeds that specified by the manufacturer;
(d) be equipped with an elevating mechanism that, upon failure, locks the work platform in the elevated position; and
(e) be operated by a competent person at all times during use.
(2) Where an elevating mechanism fails, a person on the work platform shall be removed from the platform before the platform is lowered or repairs are made to the mechanism.
(3) Where the operator of a power operated elevating work platform is not the person being raised on the work platform, there shall be an effective and direct means of communication between the two.
(4) A power operated elevating work platform shall be designed, constructed, erected, maintained, inspected, monitored and used in accordance with the following CSA Standards, as applicable:
(a) CAN3-B354.1-M82, “Elevating Rolling Work Platforms”;
(b) CAN3-B354.2-M82, “Self-Propelled Elevating Work Platforms for Use on Paved/Slab Surfaces”;
(c) CAN3-B354.3-M82, “Self-Propelled Elevating Work Platforms for Use as ‘Off-Slab’ Units”;
(d) CAN3-B354.4-M82, “Boom-Type Elevating Work Platforms”; and
(e) CSA C225 M88, “Vehicle Mounted Aerial Device”.
(5) The following information shall be readily available and accessible to the operator of a power operated elevating work platform:
(a) all of the applicable operational limitations and requirements, including those relating to the use of outriggers, stabilizers and extendable axles;
(b) the specific surface conditions required for safe use in the elevated position;
(c) such warnings as may be specified by the manufacturer;
(d) the name and number of the National Standards of Canada Standard to which the power operated elevating work platform was designed;
(e) the name and address of the owner; and
(f) a legible operator’s manual.
(6) The following information shall be securely posted at the controls of a power operated elevating work platform:
(a) the rated working capacity; and
(b) other than for a boom-type elevating work platform, the direction of the machine movement for each operating control.
(7) The owner of a power operated elevating work platform shall keep a permanent record of all inspections, tests, repairs, modifications and maintenance performed on it.
(8) The record required in subsection (7) shall include the name and signature of the person who performed the inspection, test, repair, modification or maintenance.
(9) An employer shall ensure that a person who operates a power operated elevating work platform has, before using it for the first time,
(a) received oral or written instruction on the safe operation of the particular vehicle; or
(b) otherwise been adequately trained to operate that class of work platform.
(10) The instruction and training required by subsection (9) is to be given by a competent person and must include
(a) instruction in the manufacturer’s specifications;
(b) instruction in applicable load limitations;
(c) instruction on the kinds of surfaces on which the power operated elevating work platform is designed to be used; and
(d) a hands on demonstration of the proper use of all controls.
(11) A power operated elevating work platform shall
(a) not be loaded in excess of its rated working capacity;
(b) be used on a firm level surface unless otherwise specified by the manufacturer;
(c) be otherwise used only in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications;
(d) not be loaded and used in such a manner as to create an unstable condition or cause a hazard; and
(e) not be moved vertically or horizontally unless all persons on it are protected against falling by a fall arrest system attached to an anchor point on the work platform.
(12) Where a person is working on an elevating work platform, a fall arrest system, attached to an anchor point, shall be worn at all times.
(13) Every power operated elevating work platform shall be equipped with an emergency stop button on the work platform.

Crane supported work platforms
37 (1) No work platform may be suspended from a crane or hoist unless the work to be performed cannot be done in a safe and practical manner from a conventional scaffold.
(2) The design of a hoist used for the suspension of a work platform shall be certified by a professional engineer.
(3) A crane or hoist used to suspend a work platform shall
(a) be operational in the power up and power down positions;
(b) be equipped with an automatic brake system that operates when the crane is not hoisting or lowering;
(c) be equipped with an anti-two block device;
(d) operate at a safe lifting and lowering speed; and
(e) have at least three full wraps on the hoisting drum at all times.
(4) The operator of the crane or hoist used to suspend a work platform shall have an effective means of constant communication with the person on the platform.
(5) A crane supported work platform shall have a secondary means of support, shackled above the ball of the crane, that is able to support the platform if the primary means of support fails.
(6) A commercially manufactured crane supported work platform shall be erected, used, maintained and dismantled in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications.
(7) The design of a crane supported work platform that is not commercially manufactured shall be certified by a professional engineer and erected, used, maintained and dismantled according to the design.
(8) A fall arrest system, attached to an anchor point on the work platform, shall be used by persons working from or otherwise present on a crane supported work platform.

Lifting in certain equipment prohibited
38 Except as expressly permitted in these regulations or in some other enactment, persons shall not be lifted or held aloft in equipment, such as loader buckets or backhoes, not specifically designed for that purpose.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following is © Queen’s Printer for Ontario, 2009 – 2009

Occupational Health and Safety Act – R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 851

In this Regulation,
“adequate”, when used in relation to a procedure, plan, material, device, object or thing, means that it is,
(a) sufficient for both its intended and its actual use, and
(b) sufficient to protect a worker from occupational illness or occupational injury;
“adequately” has a meaning that corresponds to the meaning of “adequate”;
“boom” means the projecting part of a back-hoe, shovel, crane or similar lifting device from which a load is likely to be supported;
“lifting device” means a device that is used to raise or lower any material or object and includes its rails and other supports but does not include a device to which the Elevating Devices Act applies;

Pre-Start Health and Safety Reviews
7. (1) In this section,
“apparatus” means equipment or a machine or device;
“protective element” means a shield, a guard, an operating control acting as a guard, a locking device or any other device preventing access;
“spray booth” means a spray booth as defined in Ontario Regulation 388/97 made under the Fire Protection and Prevention Act, 1997;
“Table” means the Table to this section. O. Reg. 528/00, s. 2.

(2) Subject to subsections (5), (7), (8) and (9), a pre-start health and safety review is required if, in a factory other than a logging operation, a provision of this Regulation listed in the Table applies and the circumstances described in the Table will exist,
(a) because a new apparatus, structure or protective element is to be constructed, added or installed or a new process is to be used; or
(b) because an existing apparatus, structure, protective element or process is to be modified and one of the following steps must be taken to obtain compliance with the applicable provision:
1. New or modified engineering controls are used.
2. Other new or modified measures are used.
3. A combination of new, existing or modified engineering controls and other new or modified measures is used. O. Reg. 528/00, s. 2.

(3) When a pre-start health and safety review is required, the owner, lessee or employer shall ensure that the apparatus, structure or protective element is not operated or used or that the process is not used, as the case may be, unless the review has been conducted, and,
(a) all measures identified in the review as being required for compliance with the relevant provisions of this Regulation that are listed in the Table have been taken; or
(b) if some or all of the measures specified in clause (a) are not taken, the owner, lessee or employer has provided written notice to the joint health and safety committee or the health and safety representative, if any, of what measures have been taken to comply with the relevant provisions of this Regulation that are listed in the Table. O. Reg. 528/00, s. 2.

(4) A pre-start health and safety review includes the preparation of a written report that is made to the owner, lessee or employer and contains,
(a) details of the measures to be taken for compliance with the relevant provisions of this Regulation that are listed in the Table;
(b) if testing is required before the apparatus or structure can be operated or used or before the process can be used, details of measures to protect the health and safety of workers that are to be taken before the testing is carried out; and
(c) if item 3 or 7 of the Table applies, details of the structural adequacy of the apparatus or structure. O. Reg. 528/00, s. 2.

(5) When item 2 of the Table applies, a pre-start health and safety review is not required if,
(a) the protective element was installed at the time the apparatus was manufactured and the conditions set out in paragraphs 1, 2 and 3 of subsection (6) are met; or
(b) the protective element was not installed at the time the apparatus was manufactured and the conditions set out in paragraphs 1, 2, 3 and 4 of subsection (6) are met. O. Reg. 528/00, s. 2.

(6) The following are the conditions mentioned in clauses (5) (a) and (b):
1. The apparatus was manufactured in accordance with and meets current applicable standards, or it has been modified to meet current applicable standards.
2. The apparatus is installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions and current applicable standards.
3. The protective element was manufactured in accordance with and meets current applicable standards, or it has been modified to meet current applicable standards.
4. The protective element is installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions, and current applicable standards, if any. O. Reg. 528/00, s. 2.

(7) When item 3 of the Table applies, a pre-start health and safety review is not required if the rack or stacking structure is designed and tested for use in accordance with current applicable standards. O. Reg. 528/00, s. 2.

(8) When item 4 of the Table applies, a pre-start health and safety review is not required if the process is conducted inside a spray booth that is manufactured and installed in accordance with current applicable standards. O. Reg. 528/00, s. 2.

(9) When item 7 of the Table applies, a pre-start health and safety review is not required,
(a) in the case of a lifting device or travelling crane, if it is in or on a supporting structure originally designed for it and its capacity does not exceed the capacity provided for in that original design;
(b) in the case of an automobile hoist, if it is certified that it meets current applicable standards. O. Reg. 528/00, s. 2.

(10) If no pre-start health and safety review is required because subsection (5), (7), (8) or (9) applies, the owner, lessee or employer shall keep documents establishing the exemption readily accessible in the workplace for as long as the protective element, rack or stacking structure or lifting device, travelling crane or automobile hoist remains in the workplace or the process is used in the workplace, as the case may be. O. Reg. 528/00, s. 2.

(11) A pre-start health and safety review required under item 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 or 7 of the Table shall be conducted by a professional engineer. O. Reg. 528/00, s. 2.

(12) A pre-start health and safety review required under item 8 of the Table shall be conducted by a professional engineer or by a person who in the opinion of the owner, lessee or employer possesses special expert or professional knowledge or qualifications appropriate to assess any potential or actual hazards. O. Reg. 528/00, s. 2.

(13) The person conducting a pre-start health and safety review shall,
(a) date and sign the written report mentioned in subsection (4);
(b) if the person is a professional engineer, affix his or her seal to the report; and
(c) if the person is not a professional engineer, include in the report details of his or her special expert or professional knowledge or qualifications. O. Reg. 528/00, s. 2.

(14) Reports of pre-start health and safety reviews conducted under this section shall,
(a) be kept readily accessible in the workplace together with any supporting documents; and
(b) be provided to the joint health and safety committee or the health and safety representative, if any, before the apparatus, structure or protective element is operated or used or the process is used. O. Reg. 528/00, s. 2.

(15) Documents kept under subsection (10) may be reviewed, on request, by,
(a) the joint health and safety committee or the health and safety representative, if any; or
(b) an inspector. O. Reg. 528/00, s. 2.

45. Material, articles or things,
(a) required to be lifted, carried or moved, shall be lifted, carried or moved in such a way and with such precautions and safeguards, including protective clothing, guards or other precautions as will ensure that the lifting, carrying or moving of the material, articles or things does not endanger the safety of any worker;
(b) shall be transported, placed or stored so that the material, articles or things,
(i) will not tip, collapse or fall, and

51. (1) A lifting device shall,
(a) be so constructed, of such strength and be equipped with suitable ropes, chains, slings and other fittings so as to adequately ensure the safety of all workers;
(b) be thoroughly examined by a competent person to determine its capability of handling the maximum load as rated,
(i) prior to being used for the first time, and
(ii) thereafter as often as necessary but not less frequently than recommended by the manufacturer and in any case, at least once a year,
and a permanent record shall be kept, signed by the competent person doing the examination;
(c) be plainly marked with sufficient information so as to enable the operator of the device to determine the maximum rated load that the device is capable of lifting under any operating condition;
(d) have a cab, screen, canopy guard or other adequate protection for the operator where the operator may be exposed to the hazard of falling material;
(e) when it is a pneumatic or hydraulic hoist, have controls that automatically return to their neutral position when released.
(2) A lifting device shall be operated,
(a) only by,
(i) a competent person, or
(ii) a worker being instructed who is accompanied by a competent person; and
(b) in such a way that,
(i) no part of the load passes over any worker,
(ii) where a worker may be endangered by the rotation or uncontrolled motion of a load, one or more guide ropes is used to prevent rotation or other uncontrolled motion, and
(iii) subject to subsection (3), when its load is in a raised position the controls are attended by an operator.
(3) Subclause (2) (b) (iii) does not apply to,
(a) a hydraulic hoist that supports the load from below and is fixed in one location; and
(b) an assembly line hoist temporarily unattended during a stoppage of the assembly line.
(4) Hoisting controls operated from other than a cab or cage shall,
(a) be located so that they can be operated at a safe distance from a load being lifted; and
(b) automatically return to their neutral position when released.
(5) Where a lifting device is equipped with limit switches, the switches shall,
(a) automatically cut off the power and apply the brake; and
(b) not be used as an operating control unless designed for such use, in which case a second limit switch shall be located behind the control limit switch. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 851, s. 51.

52. A crane, lift truck or similar equipment shall be used to support, raise or lower a worker only when,
(a) the worker is on a platform,
(i) equipped with adequate safety devices that will automatically prevent the platform and load from falling if the platform’s normal support fails,
(ii) suspended from a boom that does not move, and the person is attached to a separate lifeline suspended from the boom or a fixed support capable of supporting at least four times the weight of the worker, or
(iii) attached to a mast, or boom which,
(A) is hydraulically or pneumatically operated, and
(B) is equipped with a safety device that will prevent free fall of the platform in the event of a pressure line failure;
(b) where the equipment is not designed for the specific purpose of hoisting personnel, the load applied to the crane, lift truck or similar equipment is less than one half the maximum rated load;
(c) the platform has a sign indicating the load described in clause (b);
(d) where controls are provided at more than one location,
(i) each control station is provided with means whereby the operator can shut off power to the equipment, and
(ii) interlocks have been provided so that only one station can be operative at any time; and
(e) except when the controls are operated from the platform, the controls are attended and operated by another worker. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 851, s. 52.

53. Where a travelling crane is operated on a crane runway, there shall be,
(a) rail stops or bumpers extending at least as high as the centre of the wheels at both ends of the crane runway; and
(b) where applicable, similar rail stops at the ends of the crane bridge. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 851, s. 53.

54. (1) Mobile equipment shall,
(a) when lighting conditions are such that its operation may be hazardous, have head lights and tail lights that provide adequate illumination;
(b) when exposed to the hazard of falling material, have a screen or canopy guard adequate to protect the operator;
(c) be used to transport a person, other than the operator, only when that worker is seated in a permanently installed seat; and
(d) subject to subsection (2), be operated only by a competent person.
(2) Clause (1) (d) does not apply to mobile equipment operated by a worker while the worker is being instructed and accompanied by a competent person. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 851, s. 54.

55. A vehicle used to transport structural steel, logs or similar loads shall have a bulkhead between the operator’s cab and the load that is reasonably capable of resisting any impact caused by the shifting of the load under emergency stop conditions. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 851, s. 55.

56. Where the operator of a vehicle, mobile equipment, crane or similar material handling equipment does not have a full view of the intended path of travel of the vehicle, mobile equipment, crane or similar material handling equipment or its load, the vehicle, mobile equipment, crane or similar material handling equipment shall only be operated as directed by a signaller who is a competent person and who is stationed,
(a) in full view of the operator;
(b) with a full view of the intended path of travel of the vehicle, mobile equipment, crane or similar material handling equipment and its load; and
(c) clear of the intended path of travel of the vehicle, mobile equipment, crane or similar material handling equipment and its load. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 851, s. 56.

57. A vehicle left unattended shall be immobilized and secured against accidental movement. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 851, s. 57.

58. Powered equipment shall not be left unattended unless forks, buckets, blades and similar parts are in the lowered position or solidly supported. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 851, s.

59. Except for the purpose of a test of the material handling equipment, no material handling equipment shall be loaded in excess of its maximum rated load. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 851, s. 59.

60. (1) Except as prescribed by section 42.2, where a vehicle, crane or similar equipment is operated near a live power line carrying electricity at more than 750 volts, every part of the equipment shall be kept at least the minimum distance from the live power line set out in Column 2 of the Table for the particular voltage set out opposite thereto in Column 1 of the Table:
TABLE

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R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 851, s. 60 (1); O. Reg. 630/94, s. 3 (1).

(2) Subject to section 42.2, where a vehicle, crane or similar equipment is operated near a live power line, and it is possible for any part of the vehicle, crane or similar equipment or its load to make contact with the live power line,
(a) a worker shall be stationed within the view of the operator to warn the operator when any part of the equipment is approaching the minimum distance from the live power line; and
(b) clearance shall be allowed for any change in boom angle and for any swing of the hoisting cable and load. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 851, s. 60 (2); O. Reg. 630/94, s. 3 (2).

(ii) can be removed or withdrawn without endangering the safety of any worker; and
(c) to be removed from a storage area, pile or rack, shall be removed in a manner that will not endanger the safety of any worker. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 851, s. 45.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following material is © Government of Prince Edward Island

Cap. O-1.01 Occupational Health and Safety Act

PART 33

POWERED MOBILE EQUIPMENT

33.1 In this Part powered mobile equipment means self-propelled machinery designed to carry, push, pull, dig, compact, lift, stack, tier or move materials or to provide a work platform for employees and includes trucks. (EC180/87)

33.2 The employer shall ensure that operators of powered mobile equipment are provided with protection against falling, flying or intruding objects by means of adequate cabs, screens, shields, grills, deflectors or guards. (EC180/87)

33.3 The employer shall ensure that the equipment listed as follows and manufactured after January 1, 1974, is equipped with Rollover Protective Structures (ROPS) meeting the minimum safety requirements of the CSA Standard B352-M respecting Rollover Protective Structures for Agricultural, Construction, Earthmoving, Forestry and Industrial Machines including:
(a) crawler tractors, loaders, tree harvesters, skidders and forwarders;
(b) wheeled dozers, loaders, skidders and forwarders;
(c) motor graders, tandem rollers and compactors;
(d) self-propelled wheeled scrapers;
(e) agricultural and industrial tractors; and
(f) off-highway equipment or any other equipment designated by the Director as requiring ROPS. (EC180/87)

33.4 Equipment manufactured before January 1, 1974, equipped to meet the requirements of section 33.3 may continue to be used. (EC180/87) powered mobile equipment, defined Screens, etc.

Rollover protection

Pre-1974 equipment

33.5 Equipment manufactured before January 1, 1974, which does not meet the requirements of section 33.3 may continue to be used except in circumstances where rollover hazards are likely to exist. (EC180/87)

33.6 The employer shall ensure that the following information is permanently marked on ROPS equipment:
(a) name and address of the manufacturer or the professional engineer who certified the ROPS;
(b) machine make and model number or other effective means of identifying the machine for which the ROPS was designed; and
(c) serial number or other effective means of identifying the ROPS.
(EC180/87)

33.7 The employer shall ensure that all modifications or repairs to existing ROPS meet the requirements of this Part and are certified by the modification design agency, the installing agency or a professional engineer and the certification information is made available to an officer on request. (EC180/87)

33.8 (1) The employer shall ensure that powered mobile equipment which has been fitted with ROPS is provided with
(a) seat belts for the operator and passengers which comply with or exceed whichever of the following recommended practices of the Society of Automotive Engineers are appropriate: J386C Seat Belts for Construction Machines; J117C Dynamic Test Procedure – Type 1 and Type 2 Seat Belt Assemblies;
J800C Motor Vehicle Seat Belt Assembly Installations; or
(b) where the work process renders the wearing of seat belts impracticable, shoulder belts, bars, gates, screen or other restraining devices designed to prevent the operator and passengers from being thrown outside the rollover protective structures.
(2) The operator of and passengers on powered mobile equipment shall use the seat belts and restraining devices provided while the equipment is in motion. (EC180/87)

33.9 Where a hazard exists from falling objects, the employer shall ensure that powered mobile equipment is equipped with Falling Objects Protective Structures (FOPS) or overhead protection that meets the minimum requirements of the Recommended Practices of the Society of Automotive Engineers, or the Standards of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers (ASEA), or any other equivalent approved standard. (EC180/87)

Idem
Identification Alterations Restraint equipment Use Overhead Protection

33.10 The employer shall ensure that welding on ROPS and FOPS is carried out by a welder certified under the Boilers and Pressure Vessels Act R.S.P.E.I. 1988, Cap. B-5. (EC180/87)

33.11 (1) The Director may approve alternative proposals designed to provide protection equivalent to ROPS or FOPS when the requirement of ROPS or FOPS is not practical.
(2) The approval granted by the Director under subsection (1) shall be granted in writing for specific circumstances of a specific workplace and for a specific period of time. (EC180/87)

33.12 The employer shall ensure that powered mobile equipment
(a) is used only for the purposes for which it is designed and equipped;
(b) has a fully operative adequate braking system;
(c) has a manually operated audible warning device;
(d) has an adequate rear view mirror or other means of ensuring that the equipment can be safely backed up;
(e) has an audible automatic back-up alarm;
(f) has adequate headlights and backing lights when used after dark or in dimly lit areas;
(g) has gears and moving parts adequately guarded;
(h) has controls which cannot be operated from the outside of the cab unless the controls are designed to be operated from outside the cab;
(i) has loads adequately secured. (EC180/87)

33.13 The employer shall ensure that powered mobile equipment is operated only by competent persons. (EC180/87)

33.14 The employer shall designate an employee to give signals to an operator who is operating equipment when his vision is obstructed and the operator shall use the equipment only on mutually agreed signals between the operator and designated employee. (EC180/87)

33.15 When work is carried out in areas where dust may create a hazard to employees, the employer shall take adequate measures to keep the dust at a minimum level. (EC180/87)

33.16 The operators of powered mobile equipment shall
(a) ensure that passengers do not ride on any part of the equipment not designed to carry passengers;
(b) not set equipment in motion until all air and hydraulic pressures are fully built up to the specified operating pressures;
(c) when leaving equipment unattended,
(i) park it on level ground,

Welding Approval of alternatives
Idem
Equipment requirements Operator competence Signals Dust Responsibilities of Operators

(ii) set the brake,
(iii) lower the blades and bucket or safely block them,
(iv) disengage the master clutch,
(v) stop the engine, and
(vi) remove the key;
(d) follow a safe refuelling procedure;
(e) not store containers of gasoline, diesel oil or other substances which may constitute a hazard in the cab;
(f) not carry on or in the equipment, loose articles or equipment which might create a hazard. (EC180/87)

33.17 The operator of powered mobile equipment shall keep the equipment in gear when going downhill. (EC180/87)

33.18 The employer shall ensure that powered mobile equipment
(a) is maintained in safe working condition;
(b) has defective parts repaired or replaced before being set in motion;
(c) has air and hydraulic lines, hoses and components maintained in safe operating condition;
(d) has wire ropes, drums and sheaves inspected daily;
(e) is lubricated only when the machine is at rest or as the manufacturer has expressly directed;
(f) when tires are being installed on lock ring type rims, has an approved restraining device for the ring;
(g) has safe and easy access to the operators station by means of a ladder or steps and handrail. (EC180/87)

33.19 (1) The employer shall ensure that equipment which is raised from the ground by means of jacks or hoists is adequately blocked.
(2) Mats or heavy planking shall be used to distribute the load on soft ground. (EC180/87)

33.20 The employer shall ensure that persons do not work under or go under the raised parts of any equipment unless the parts are adequately blocked and the employee shall not work under or go under such raised parts unless the parts are adequately blocked. (EC180/87)

33.21 The employer shall ensure that when repair or maintenance work is carried out at the point of articulation on front end loaders or similar equipment, lock bars are used to prevent movement of either end of the loader. (EC180/87)

33.22 The employer shall ensure that where any equipment is to be used on a slope or bank which could give way, that adequate precautions are
Use of gears, Responsibilities of employers, Blocks, Mats

Idem
Lock bars
Load distribution taken to stabilize the bank and distribute the load of the equipment.

(EC180/87)

33.23 (1) The employer shall ensure that a truck used for transportation of employees has seats and is enclosed on all sides.
(2) No person shall get on or off trucks which are in motion or be permitted to get on or off trucks which are in motion. (EC180/87)

33.24 Employees shall not be permitted to remain in or on the cab of equipment while it is being loaded by a crane or power shovel.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following is © Gouvernement du Quebec, 2009

c. S-2.1, r.19.01

Regulation Respecting Occupational Health and Safety

An Act respecting occupational health and safety

R.S.Q., c. S-2.1, s. 223. 1st par. subpar. (1), (3), (4), (7) to (16), (18) to (21.1), (41) and (42), 2nd par. and 3rd par

DIVISION I
INTERPRETATION AND SCOPE

Definitions: In this regulation, the following words and expressions mean:
“aerial basket lifting device”: any elevator equipped with an extendable/retractable or jointed arm designed to be fitted with a carrier and used to lift workers or supplies by means of a basket on work sites ;

“self-propelled vehicleâ€: a motor vehicle mounted on wheels, on tracks or on rails, used for the transportation of objects or materials, or for towing or pushing trailers or materials, with the exception of an all-terrain vehicle or an elevating or lifting device ;

DIVISION XXIII
HANDLING AND TRANSPORTING MATERIAL

2. Hoisting devices

245. Operating conditions: Every hoisting device shall be used, maintained and repaired in such a manner that its use does not compromise the health, safety or physical well-being of workers. Consequently, such a device shall:
(1) be inspected before it is used for the first time;
(2) have its motor turned off when filling the gas tank;
(3) not be used if strong winds, storms or extreme temperatures make it dangerous to use;
(4) not be used when repair or maintenance work is being carried out;
(5) be inspected and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions or standards offering equivalent safety;
(6) when one of its parts is repaired, reconditioned or replaced, provide as regards this part a level of safety that is equivalent to that of the original part;
(7) not be modified to increase its rated load or to be used for any other purpose without a signed and sealed certificate from an engineer or a written certificate from the manufacturer, indicating that the modification is safe.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 245.

246. Hoisting accessories: Hoisting accessories shall be solidly built, have requisite resistance, depending on their use, and be kept in good working order.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 246.

247. Safe access: When a hoisting device has an operator’s station for moving the device about or a control station for hoisting, the latter shall be safely accessible by means of a ladder, steps, grip handles or any other means.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 247.

248. Precautions: A hoisting device shall not:
(1) be loaded beyond its rated load;
(2) be subject to sudden movements.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 248.

249. Rated load: The rated load shall be indicated on all hoisting devices, at a place where it is easy to read.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 249.

250. Load-rating table: A table shall indicate the rated loads of a crane or of a similar device. This table shall:
(1) be so placed as to be easily read by the operator;
(2) provide information which complies with that provided by the manufacturer;
(3) furnish all the necessary information for the safe operation of the crane or apparatus.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 250.
251. Mobile crane: A mobile crane shall meet the requirements of the CSA Z150-1974 Safety Code for Mobile Cranes standard and its supplement no 1-1977, or any other recognized standard offering equivalent safety.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 251.

252. Transformed mobile crane: A mobile crane with a luffing boom transformed and used for purposes other than the hoisting of loads, and serving as a scoop, a dragging bucket, a clamshell bucket or a pile hammer shall be equipped:
(1) with bumpers or boom stops;
(2) a high boom angle switch.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 252.

253. Signalman: If the operator of a hoisting device does not have an unrestricted view during any manoeuvre, one or more signalmen shall assist the operator. The signalman shall:
(1) observe the movement of the apparatus or the load when it is out of sight of the operator;
(2) communicate with the operator by a well-established, uniform signal code or by means of a telecommunication system, when conditions so require or when the operator judges it necessary.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 253.

254. Travelling crane: A general purpose overhead travelling crane, with the exception of a single-girder overhead crane, shall conform to the CSA B167-1964 General Purpose Electric Overhead Travelling Cranes standard.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 254.

254.1. Training of the overhead travelling crane operator: An overhead travelling crane must be operated exclusively by an operator who has received theoretical and practical training given by an instructor.

The theoretical training must cover, among other things,
(1) a description of the different types of overhead travelling cranes and hoisting accessories used in the establishment;
(2) the workplace and how it affects the operation of the overhead travelling crane;
(3) the operations involved in operating the over-head travelling crane and hoisting accessories, such as using slings and control devices, signalling using the universal system, handling and moving loads, and any other manoeuvre necessary to the operation of the overhead travelling crane;
(4) the means of communication used in the operation of the overhead travelling crane;
(5) the inspection to verify the working order and proper functioning of the overhead travelling crane and hoisting accessories prior to operation by the operator; and
(6) the rules governing the operation of the overhead travelling crane, and the establishment’s directives regarding the work environment.

Practical training within the context of the second paragraph must be given in the workplace under conditions that do not expose the operator and other workers to hazards arising from the overhead travelling crane operation training. The training must also be of sufficient duration to enable the overhead travelling crane and hoisting accessories to be operated safely.

When the operation of the overhead travelling crane and hoisting accessories requires the presence of a signaller or slinger, those persons must also be given theoretical and practical training on the duties they are to perform.

O.C. 510-2008, s. 3.

255. Safe handling of loads: The handling of loads on a work site shall take place in accordance with the following standards:
(1) before hoisting a load, the operator or the signalman shall ensure that all the cables, chains, slings or other moorings are properly attached to the load and that hoisting does not present any hazard;
(2) the hoisting of loads shall be done vertically;
(3) when oblique hoisting is absolutely necessary, precautions dictated by the circumstances shall be taken, and this operation shall be performed in the presence of a competent person representing the employer;
(4) if the uncontrolled movement or the swinging of a raised load involves a danger, one or more guide ropes shall be used;
(5) the hoisting device shall not be left unsupervised when a load is suspended therefrom;
(6) the moving of loads above people shall be avoided and, if this is not possible, then specific measures shall be taken to ensure the safety of these persons;
(7) it is prohibited for any person to stand on a load, a hook or a sling suspended from a hoisting device;
(8) the hooks used to hoist loads as well as those attached to slings shall be equipped with a safety catch except where these hooks are specifically designed for the safe hoisting of certain loads.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 255.

257. Lifting jacks: Lifting jacks that are used to lift loads shall:
(1) rest on solid bases;
(2) be lined up with the load to lift;
(3) be equipped with a positive stop to prevent overstop or a stop indicator.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 257.

258. Hoisting devices that can be dismantled: Hoisting devices that can be dismantled shall be assembled, maintained and dismantled in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions or trade practice.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 258.

259. Brakes and warning device: A hoisting device shall be equipped with :
(1) hoisting brakes so designed and installed as to stop a load of at least one and half times that of the rated load ;
(2) a warning device when the hoisting device is motorized, except in the case of a person-lifter.

The warning device shall be used each time that a load is moved over a work station or a traffic area.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 259.

260. Prohibition: Subject to section 261, no operator shall lift a worker using a hoisting device, unless the latter was designed for that purpose by the manufacturer.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 260.

261. Lifting of a worker : The lifting of a worker using a mobile crane is permitted if the conditions set out in section 3.10.7 of the Safety Code for the construction industry (c. S-2.1, r. 6) as it reads at the time that it applies, are respected.

The lifting of a worker using a fork lift truck must be done in compliance with ASME Standard B56.1 (1993-A.1995) Safety Standard for Low Lift and High Lift Trucks.

Each worker must wear a safety harness that complies with sections 347 and 348.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 261; O.C. 1120-2006, s. 5.

262. Aerial basket lifting device: Every aerial basket lifting device must be designed, manufactured and installed on a carrier vehicle in compliance with CSA Standard C225 or ANSI Standard A92.2 applicable at the time of its manufacture.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 262; O.C. 1120-2006, s. 6.

263. Aerial basket lifting device – design and manufacture: Every aerial basket lifting device designed and manufactured before November 1976 must
(1) be equipped with an emergency stop button located within reach of the worker occupying the basket ; and
(2) be installed on a carrier that must provide a stable and structurally sound support when the basket is used.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 263; O.C. 1120-2006, s. 6.

263.1. Aerial basket lifting device – training : Every worker operating an aerial basket lifting device must undergo training in compliance with articles 10.11 to 10.11.3 of CSA Standard C225-00 Vehicle-Mounted Aerial Devices and more specifically on the operating methods related to the operation in motion of the carrier vehicle of the aerial basket lifting device.

O.C. 1120-2006, s. 6.

264. Protection against falls: The wearing of a safety harness is compulsory for any worker occupying the aerial basket of a lifting device, except if the worker is protected by some other device that provides him with equivalent safety.

A safety harness shall be equipped with an energy absorber and a lifeline attached to an anchorage point specified by the manufacturer or any other anchorage point independent of the basket and offering a resistance to breakage of at least 18 kilonewtons per worker who is anchored thereto.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 264.

4. Self-propelled vehicles

272. Conditions of use and maintenance: Every self-propelled vehicle shall be used, made and repaired in such way that it does not compromise the health, safety and well-being of workers. Consequently:
(1) the vehicle motor shall be in the off position during fueling, except if a safe work method has been established;
(2) the vehicle shall not be used if repair or maintenance work is being carried out on it;
(3) the vehicle shall be maintained and inspected in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions or standards offering equivalent safety;
(4) when one of its parts is repaired, reconditioned or replaced, this new part shall provide a level of safety that is equivalent to that of the original part.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 272.

273. Safe access: The control or operating station of a self-propelled vehicle shall be easily and safely accessible by means of a step, grip handles or a ladder.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 273.

274. Brakes and warning device: Every self-propelled vehicle shall:
(1) be equipped with efficient brakes;
(2) be equipped with a warning device (siren).

The warning device shall be used in yards and in buildings when there are persons nearby and in areas presenting a risk, such as doors and around bends.

Subparagraph 2 of the first paragraph does not apply to tracked bulldozers and hauling machines.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 274.

275. Design and safe layout : A self-propelled vehicle shall be designed, built and laid out so as to ensure that the driver is not struck or does not get caught by a moving vehicle part, and is not otherwise injured by operating the vehicle on entering or leaving the cab.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 275.

276. Protection of the driver: The self-propelled vehicle shall be equipped with a roof, a protective screen, a cab or a structure to protect the driver in the following cases:
(1) where there is a risk of falling objects;
(2) if the driver risks impact with an object being handled.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 276.

277. Protective structure of self-propelled vehicles: The following self-propelled vehicles manufactured starting on the 2 August 2001 shall be provided before the date of the 180th day following the 2 August 2001 with a roll-over protective structure which meets the CSA B352-M1980 Roll-over Protective Structures standard for farm, construction, landscaping, forestry, industrial and mining vehicles:
(1) industrial tractors, motor graders, prime movers, tracked hauling machines, crawler tractors, tracked loaders, wheeled tractors and wheeled loaders, whose mass is greater than 700 kilograms;
(2) compacting machines and rollers whose mass is greater than 2 700 kilograms, except machines designed for compacting asphalt;
(3) wheeled agricultural tractors of more than 15 kilowatts.

This section does not apply to a low profile agricultural tractor when it is used in an orchard.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 277.

278. Protective structures of existing self-propelled vehicles: The following self-propelled vehicles manufactured before the date on which this regulation comes into force shall be provided with a roll-over protective structure which meets a standard from The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) standardization organization or a standard providing equivalent safety:
(1) power rams, and tracked or wheeled loaders and hauling machines;
(2) graders;
(3) tractor scrapers;
(4) agricultural and industrial tractors of more than 15 kilowatts.

The design, manufacture or installation of a protective structure is deemed to be in compliance with the standard if it has been certified, signed and sealed by an engineer.

This section does not apply to graders or loaders used for snow removal if these vehicles only circulate in places where there is no risk of overturning. Nor does it apply to a low profile agricultural tractor when used in an orchard.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 278.

279. Identification plate: A plate shall be attached to the protective structure in the event of an overturn. This plate shall indicate:
(1) the name of the manufacturer;
(2) the protective structure’s serial number;
(3) the standard with which it complies;
(4) the make and model of equipment for which it was designed.

The plate shall be permanently attached and the inscriptions thereupon shall be legible at all times.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 279.

280. Safety belt: The wearing of a safety belt is mandatory for the driver of a self-propelled vehicle equipped with a roll-over protective structure as well as for any worker in the vehicle while it is in motion.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 280.

281. Protective shield: Self-propelled vehicles equipped with a winch for towing materials shall have a protective shield between the winch and the driver if there is a risk of injuring the driver should the cable snap.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 281.

282. Seat and belt: Any persons other than the driver are prohibited from being on a self-propelled vehicle, if it is not equipped with a seat and a belt to accommodate each person.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 282.

283. Vehicle in motion: No worker shall remain on the load of a self-propelled vehicle in motion.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 283.

284. Signalman: When a self-propelled vehicle moves in reverse, a signalman shall direct the driver if such a move poses a risk for the safety of a worker or the driver.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 284.

285. Prohibition: The driver of a self-propelled vehicle referred to under section 277 or 278 shall not leave his vehicle unattended when the mobile part of the device used for lifting, towing or pushing a load is in a raised position.

O.C. 885-2001, s. 285.

This material has been extracted from the Acts and Regulations of the Province to help students understand the subject. It is not an official source of information and must not be used for any other purpose.

The following is Copyright©2009 The Queen™ Printer, Saskatchewan

The Occupational Health and Safety Regulations, 1996

(a) Aerial device means a vehicle-mounted telescoping or articulating unit that is used to position a worker at an elevated worksite, and includes a work basket or bucket, an aerial ladder, an extendable and articulating boom platform, a vertical tower and any combination of those devices;

Aerial devices and elevating work platforms

192(1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that:

(a) an aerial device, elevating work platform or personnel lifting unit is designed, constructed, erected, operated and maintained in accordance with an approved standard; or
(b) a professional engineer has certified that:

(i) an aerial device, elevating work platform or personnel lifting unit and its elevating system and mountings are safe for the purpose of raising workers and loads; and
(ii) the components of an aerial device, elevating work platform or personnel lifting unit and its elevating system and mountings are designed in accordance with an approved standard.

(2) An employer or contractor shall not require or permit a worker to be raised or lowered by any aerial device or elevating work platform or to work from a device or platform held in an elevated position unless:

(a) there is an adequate and suitable means of communication between the worker operating the controls and the worker raised on the platform, if they are not the same person;
(b) the elevating mechanism is designed so that, if any failure of the mechanism occurs, the platform will descend in a controlled manner so that no worker on the platform will be endangered;
(c) the controls are designed so that the platform will be moved only when direct pressure is applied to the controls;
(d) the drive mechanism of any operation for moving the platform is positive and does not rely on gravity;
(e) road traffic conditions, environmental conditions, overhead wires, cables and other obstructions do not create a danger to the worker;
(f) the brakes of the aerial device or elevating work platform are engaged, except when operated in accordance with manufacturer’s recommendations;
(g) if the aerial device or elevating work platform is equipped with outriggers, the outriggers are set;
(h) pursuant to clause (i), the worker is provided with and is required to use a personal fall arrest system that meets the requirements of Part VII; and

(i) the aerial device or elevating work platform is equipped with a lanyard attachment point that is:
(i) designed and constructed to an approved standard; or
(ii) certified as safe by a professional engineer and installed and used in accordance with that design.

(3) Notwithstanding any other provision in this section but subject to section 465, an employer or contractor shall not require or permit a worker working on an exposed energized high voltage electrical conductor to work from an aerial device or elevating work platform unless the controls are operated by the worker on the device or platform.

(4) Where a worker leaves an aerial device or elevating work platform parked or
unattended, an employer or contractor shall ensure that the device or platform:

(a) is locked or rendered inoperative; or
(b) is fully lowered and retracted with all hydraulic systems in the neutral position or incapable of operating by moving the controls.
(5) An employer or contractor shall ensure that:
(a) a worker who operates an aerial device or elevating work platform is trained to operate the device or platform safely; and
(b) the training includes the manufacturer’s instructions and recommendations, the load limitations, the proper use of all controls and any limitations on the surfaces on which the device or platform is designed to be used.

(5.1) An employer or contractor shall ensure that, while a worker is on a work
platform mounted on a forklift and the forklift is in the raised position, the
operator:

(a) remains at the controls; and
(b) does not drive the forklift.

(6) An employer or contractor shall ensure that the manufacturer’s operating
manual for the aerial device or elevating work platform is kept with the device or
platform at all times.

Maintenance and inspection

193(1) An employer, contractor, owner or supplier shall ensure that only competent persons maintain and inspect an aerial device, elevating work platform, suspended powered platform, personnel lifting unit or scaffold to which section 177 applies.

(2) An employer, contractor, owner or supplier shall ensure that a maintenance and inspection record tag:

(a) is provided for an aerial device, elevating work platform, suspended powered scaffold, personnel lifting unit or scaffold to which section 177 applies, and is attached to the device, platform, unit or scaffold near the operator’s station; and
(b) has the following recorded on it:

(i) the date of the last maintenance;
(ii) the name and signature of the person who performed the maintenance; and
(iii) an indication that the maintenance has been carried out in accordance with the manufacture’s recommendations.

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